Links

There are 2233 tagged web links in this list.

SKA: UK to build software brain for giant radio telescope

The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will initially comprise 197 dishes and 130,000 antennas spread across South Africa and Australia. All will be linked and need to work in perfect harmony.

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Dog longevity: How long will my pet dog live?

Do you look at your dog and wonder how long it might live? Do you ponder how many more years you'll get to go for walks or to cuddle on the sofa?

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Exercise is good for joints with wear-and-tear arthritis

Exercise is good for people with wear-and-tear joint arthritis and should be a "core treatment", new draft guidelines for the NHS advise.

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Elon Musk loses bid to end Tesla tweets oversight deal

Elon Musk has lost a bid to get out of an agreement made with regulators requiring oversight of his tweets about his car firm Tesla. The settlement was made after he tweeted he had "funding secured" to potentially take Tesla private despite a deal not being close.

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Could high-flying drones power your home one day?

A growing number of companies believe using tethered kites and drones is a viable way to harness the stronger and more consistent high-altitude winds. Could this tech release wind power's full potential, or will it always remain a niche solution?

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City of Bielefeld offers €1m for proof it doesn't exist

It's a German city dating back to the 9th Century, with 340,000 residents, a university, a medieval fort... but does it really exist? Bielefeld is now offering a €1m (£914,000) prize to anyone in Germany who can prove the city's non-existence.

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Could aviation ever be less polluting?

The aviation industry is under pressure to reduce carbon emissions, yet air travel continues to grow in popularity around the world. Can technological innovation help square this circle, or should we simply fly less often?

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TED 2018: Fake Obama video creator defends invention

The clip shows a computer-generated version of the former US leader mapped to fit an audio recording. Experts have warned the tech involved could spark a "political crisis". Dr Supasorn Suwajanakorn acknowledged that there was a "potential for misuse".

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Mona Lisa 'brought to life' with deepfake AI

The subject of Leonardo da Vinci's famous Mona Lisa painting has been brought to life by AI researchers. The video, achieved from a single photo, shows the model in the portrait moving her head, eyes and mouth.

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App that can remove women's clothes from images shut down

An app that claimed to be able to digitally remove the clothes from pictures of women to create fake nudes has been taken offline by its creators. The $50 (£40) Deepnude app won attention and criticism because of an article by tech news site Motherboard.

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The man who can remember every day of his life

Bob Petrella can recall any moment from his past. Called highly superior autobiographical memory, there are around 60 known cases around the world. “It’s almost like having a time machine, where I can go back to a certain day or a certain period in my life and almost feel like I’m back there.

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Nature loss: 'Insatiable greed' degrading land around the world

Human activities are damaging and degrading the lands of the Earth in an unsustainable fashion according to a new UN report. Up to 40% of the global terrain has already been devalued, mainly through modern agriculture.

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What if all guns disappeared?

This story originally published in April 2018 as part of our series What If, which uses imaginary scenarios to help us better understand the real world. On 24 March 2018, more than two million people took to the streets in the US to protest gun violence.

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How interchangeable parts revolutionised the way things are made

One sweltering afternoon in July 1785, officials, dignitaries and a few infuriated gunsmiths gathered at the Château de Vincennes, a splendid castle to the east of Paris.

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Osama Bin Laden: The night he came for dinner

What happens when your surprise dinner guest turns out to be the world's most wanted man? A year on from the death of Osama Bin Laden, two men tell how they came to host the then leader of al-Qaeda.

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Shakil Afridi: The doctor who helped the CIA find Bin Laden

It's the first time Shakil Afridi's case has been heard in open court. The judge adjourned the case until 22 October at the request of prosecutors. Dr Afridi's role was a huge embarrassment for Pakistan. He argues he was denied a fair trial.

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If we made contact with aliens, how would religions react?

In 2014, Nasa awarded $1.1M to the Center for Theological Inquiry, an ecumenical research institute in New Jersey, to study “the societal implications of astrobiology”. Some were enraged.

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Do animals have imagination?

An eight-year-old juvenile chimpanzee named Kakama trudged along a path among the forest trees, following his pregnant mother. A scientist sat silently at a distance, watching Kakama pick up a log and carry it with him for hours.

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The truth about family estrangement

It’s often said that food brings people together. But it can also split families apart. Cookbook author Nandita Godbole has experienced this first-hand. Her affluent Indian family, who generally had hired cooks in their homes, disapproved of her choice of profession.

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Does listening to Mozart really boost your brainpower?

You have probably heard of the Mozart effect. It’s the idea that if children or even babies listen to music composed by Mozart they will become more intelligent. A quick internet search reveals plenty of products to assist you in the task.

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Bitcoin becomes official currency in Central African Republic

The Central African Republic has approved Bitcoin as legal tender - just the second country to do so. CAR is one of the world's poorest countries, but is rich in diamonds, gold and uranium.

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How you can make better predictions

Some people have a gift for predicting the future. Not a vague, ambiguous prediction, but reasoned, cautious and thoughtful foresight. These people can see the likelihood of a companies’ commercial success or the outcome of elections better than anyone else.

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Why all babies love peekaboo

One of us hides our eyes and then slowly reveals them. This causes peals of laughter from a baby, which causes us to laugh in turn. Then we do it again. And again. Peekaboo never gets old.

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The mystery of why you can't remember being a baby

You’re out to lunch with someone you’ve known for a few years. Together you’ve held parties, celebrated birthdays, visited parks and bonded over your mutual love of ice cream. You’ve even been on holiday together. In all, they’ve spent quite a lot of money on you – roughly £63,224.

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Clues to your personality appeared before you could talk

Your personality has been sculpted by many hands. Your genes, your friends, the schools you attended, plus many other factors, will all have played a part in making you the person you are today.

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Why do babies laugh out loud?

What makes babies laugh? It sounds like one of the most fun questions a researcher could investigate, but there's a serious scientific reason why Caspar Addyman wants to find out. He’s not the first to ask this question.

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Why children become bullies at school

When RubySam Youngz was singled out by a bully at the age of 10 in her last year of primary school, she felt isolated and confused. She’d just moved with her family from England to Wales and the bully honed in on her accent. They then started mocking her appearance.

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Why we believe fake news

It’s commonplace to say that we’re all deluged by more information than we can possibly handle.

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Central heating boilers 'put climate change goals at risk'

The UK will not meet its climate change targets without a revolution in home heating, a think tank says. But a poll conducted among MPs suggests that most do not consider pollution from home heating to be a priority.

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Sore knee? Maybe you have a fabella

image copyrightImperial College LondonA little bone in the knee scientists thought was being lost to evolution seems to be making a comeback, say experts from Imperial College London.The fabella is found in some people buried in the tendon just behind their knee.

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Why the way we talk to children really matters

Conversation runs out quickly when talking to a newborn. They don’t say anything back. They won’t groan when you tell them it’s going to rain, or smile when you tell a joke. At the same time, those early weeks are shrouded in a cloud of exhaustion.

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The secret of being a good father

The Aka tribesmen in the Central African Republic often look after their young children while the mothers are out hunting. They soothe, clean and play with their babies, and spend more time holding them than fathers in any other society.

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The teenager who's been married too many times to count

Kadhimiya is the location of one of Shia Islam's most important pilgrimage sites. Millions of people come from all over the world to visit the mosque commemorating the martyrdom of the death, in the 8th Century, of Moussa al-Kadhim, the seventh of the 12 Shia imams. 

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Why billionaires have more sons

Throughout history, couples have gone to extraordinary lengths to choose the sex of their child. In the middle ages, women believed they could swing the odds of having a son by asking their husbands to turn their faces eastwards during sex.

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The former monk who runs a $100m meditation firm

The BBC's weekly The Boss series profiles different business leaders from around the world. This week we speak to Andy Puddicombe and Richard Pierson, co-founders of meditation app Headspace. It was a series of tragedies that sent Andy Puddicombe's life onto a completely different path.

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Blood pressure pills 'work better at bedtime'

To get the best out of your daily blood pressure medication, take it just before you go to bed, say researchers. It's a simple tip that could save lives, they say in the European Heart Journal.

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Climate change: Should you fly, drive or take the train?

The climate campaigner Greta Thunberg chose to sail to a UN climate conference in New York in a zero-emissions yacht rather than fly - to highlight the impact of aviation on the environment. The 16-year-old Swede has previously travelled to London and other European cities by train.

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Do supermarkets know more about us than we do?

When you buy something at the supermarket, what makes you pick one brand - or one product - over another? Retailers invest huge sums trying to understand this decision-making process, or influence it, in a UK grocery market worth almost £200bn.

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From Mosaic

Pepi Nana stirs, and sits up in bed. “Tiddle toddle, tiddle toddle,” she says, flapping her arms, and blinking a pair of enormous round eyes. She walks over to the desk, sits down, and, using the oversized pencil in her front pocket, scribbles a letter to the Moon.

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Ukraine war to cause biggest price shock in 50 years - World Bank

The war in Ukraine is set to cause the "largest commodity shock" since the 1970s, the World Bank has warned. In a new forecast, it said disruption caused by the conflict would contribute to huge price rises for goods ranging from natural gas to wheat and cotton.

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Rare ancient scroll found in Israel Cave of Horror

Fragments of a Biblical scroll and other relics have been found in what officials call an "historic discovery" in desert caves in Israel. The dozens of pieces of parchment were written in Greek, with just the name of God appearing in Hebrew.

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How high-profile scientists felt tricked by group denying climate change

A dozen scientists, politicians, and campaigners say they have been tricked into participating in online events promoting climate-change denial.The events were organised by the Creative Society, an international activist group that denies global warming is being caused by human activity.

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Lab-grown meat and insects 'good for planet and health'

Dining on the likes of lab-grown meat or ground-up insects could lead to big savings in carbon emissions and water, as well as freeing up land for nature. That's the finding of a study calculating the environmental benefits of "greener" foods hitting our plates.

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How a Japanese boat trip ended in tragedy

It's an old cliché, but an accurate one: disasters are not caused by a single mistake. Several things need to go wrong at the same time to cause a tragedy. That appears to be exactly what happened on Saturday afternoon off the coast of Hokkaido in northern Japan.

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Kane Tanaka: Japanese woman certified world's oldest person dies

Kane Tanaka was born in 1903, the same year as George Orwell, at a time when Japan was emerging as a global power. She got married a century ago, and had four children. She spent her later years in a Japanese care home, where she enjoyed board games and chocolate.

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Donald Trump held in contempt in New York legal battle

A US judge has held former President Donald Trump in contempt for failing to turn over files for an investigation into his business practices.Justice Arthur Engoron on Monday ordered Mr Trump pay a fine of $10,000 (£7,850) per day until he complies.

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Elon Musk strikes deal to buy Twitter for $44bn

The board of Twitter has agreed to a $44bn (£34.5bn) takeover offer from the billionaire Elon Musk. Mr Musk, who made the shock bid less than two weeks ago, said Twitter had "tremendous potential" that he would unlock.

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Egyptian pharaoh's mummy digitally unwrapped for first time

The mummified body of an ancient Egyptian pharaoh has been studied for the first time in millennia after being digitally "unwrapped". The mummy of Amenhotep I, who ruled from 1525 to 1504 BC, was found at a site in Deir el-Bahari 140 years ago.

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Kerncentrales nog beter voor klimaat door levensduurverlenging, vragen over nucleair afval en veiligheid blijven

De uitstoot van onze Europese kerncentrales is tussen 2014 en 2020 gedaald van 12 naar 5,1 gram  CO₂ per eenheid gemaakte stroom. Dat blijkt uit een nieuw rapport van de Verenigde Naties. Kerncentrales zijn zo de meest klimaatvriendelijke technologie geworden om elektriciteit te produceren.

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The high-tech fitness mirrors that aim to get you exercising more

For most people, including fitness fans, the thought of having to watch yourself work out is not an appealing one. We don't look our best while sweating on a treadmill or grimacing on a weights machine.

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