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Pompeii: Ancient pregnant tortoise surprises archaeologists

When Mount Vesuvius erupted nearly 2,000 years ago Pompeii's ancient residents were frozen in place by ash. So too it turns out were the city's flora and fauna - including a pregnant tortoise with her egg.

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What if all roads went underground?

In 1863, in an effort to reduce street traffic, London opened the world’s first underground line, the Metropolitan Railway.

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Afghanistan earthquake: At least 250 killed and scores wounded in Paktika province

Pictures being shared on social media showed injured people on stretchers, rubble and destruction of homes in Paktika province. The quake struck about 44km (27 miles) from the south-eastern city of Khost.

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Patrice Lumumba: Why Belgium is returning a Congolese hero's golden tooth

Shot dead by a firing squad in 1961 with the tacit backing of former colonial power Belgium, his body was then buried in a shallow grave, dug up, transported 200km (125 miles), interred again, exhumed and then hacked to pieces and finally dissolved in acid.

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In photos: Throwback to life on Indian streets

In the age of mobile phones and social media, everyone is a bit of a photographer, drawing hordes of fans on their Instagram accounts. But a gallery in India recently held an exhibition looking back on the time-honoured tradition of street photography.

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Congo peat: The 'lungs of humanity' which are under threat

Image source, Daniel Beltrá/Greenpeace AfricaA giant slab of carbon-rich peat, discovered in central Africa, is under threat from uncontrolled development - posing a significant risk for future climate change, writes BBC Africa correspondent Andrew Harding.

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Roe v Wade: Rifts divide abortion views in Mississippi

At Mississippi's last abortion clinic, doctors arrive at work greeted by abuse and prayers for their souls. The Pink House, as it's known, sits on the corner of one of Jackson's main roads.

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Bitcoin: Will El Salvador's big crypto gamble pay off?

Cryptocurrencies have continued to tumble this week with billions wiped from the value of tokens like Bitcoin. The crash is affecting investors worldwide, including the government of El Salvador.

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Bitcoin: Why is the largest cryptocurrency crashing?

The first rule of writing about Bitcoin is: don't write about Bitcoin. The story of the world's best known cryptocurrency is astonishingly fast-moving and its fans will soon line up to tell you you've got it all wrong.

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Whiskey Wars: Denmark and Canada strike deal to end 50-year row over Arctic island

Denmark and Canada have struck a deal to settle almost 50 years of good-natured squabbling over the ownership of a small, uninhabited Arctic island. Since 1971, the countries have been "fighting" the "Whiskey Wars" to settle competing claims over Hans Island.

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'How to murder your husband' writer sentenced for murdering husband

Murder, she wrote - and for murder, she is going to jail. An Oregon judge has sentenced Nancy Crampton Brophy, a romance author who apparently foretold of her crime in an essay titled "How to murder your husband", to life in prison for the shooting death of her late spouse.

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Gaia continues quest for the ultimate sky map

Europe's Gaia telescope dropped its latest batch of data on Monday as it seeks to assemble the largest catalogue of light sources in the sky. It is becoming a discovery machine like no other.

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AI-driven robot boat Mayflower crosses Atlantic Ocean

A crewless ship designed to recreate the Mayflower's historic journey across the Atlantic 400 years ago has crossed the ocean, project bosses have said. The Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS) completed a 2,700-mile (4,400km) trip from Plymouth in the UK to Halifax in Nova Scotia, Canada, on Sunday.

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Google engineer says Lamda AI system may have its own feelings

Image source, Getty ImagesA Google engineer says one of the firm's artificial intelligence (AI) systems might have its own feelings and says its "wants" should be respected.

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Man v horse: Powys race won by runner Ricky Lightfoot

Runner Ricky Lightfoot received £3,500 after beating the first horse by more than two minutes on a 22.5 mile (36km) course in Llanwrtyd Wells, Powys. He came out on top of 1,000 runners and 50 horses with a time of 2:22:23.

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Why you may have a thinking digital twin within a decade

Most of us have been told by a friend that we have a doppelganger - some stranger they passed on the street who bore an uncanny resemblance to you. But imagine if you could create your very own twin, an exact copy of yourself, but one that lived a purely digital life?

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Putin and Peter the Great: Russian leader likens himself to 18th Century tsar

Vladimir Putin's admiration for Peter the Great is well known but he now seems to have ideas of "Great"-ness himself.

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What would happen if we stopped using plastic?

Of the 8,300 million tonnes of virgin plastic produced up to the end of 2015, 6,300 million tonnes has been discarded. Most of that plastic waste is still with us, entombed in landfills or polluting the environment.

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Julian Assange: Does Wikileaks founder have a powerful ally in new Australian PM?

After more than a decade spent trying to avoid extradition from the UK, Julian Assange is running out of time and options. But with the election of a new government in his native Australia last month, his supporters hope he has a new, powerful ally.

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Shipwreck The Gloucester hailed most important since Mary Rose

The discovery of a shipwrecked warship that sank while carrying a future king has been hailed the most important maritime find since the Mary Rose. The Gloucester ran aground off the coast of Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, in 1682, nearly killing the Duke of York, who became King James II of England.

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