Links

There are 5113 links in this list.

Boys rescued in Zambia after circumcision abductions

Forty-eight boys in Zambia have been rescued from a male circumcision camp, after desperate complaints by some parents that their children had been abducted. One of the boys was on HIV medication and had not taken his anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs for two weeks, officials confirmed to the BBC.

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'Supermodel granny' drug extends life in animals

The treated mice were known as "supermodel grannies" in the lab because of their youthful appearance. They were healthier, stronger and developed fewer cancers than their unmedicated peers.

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Lewd tourist antics on Florence statue lead to outrage

There has been outrage in Italy after a female tourist in Florence was pictured miming a lewd act on a statue of the Roman god Bacchus. In the photos - which were shared online by the social media account Welcome To Florence - the woman can also be seen kissing the life-size statue at nighttime.

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Smoke on the horizon - Israel and Hezbollah edge closer to all-out war

As the war in Gaza grinds on, there are growing fears another Middle East war may erupt - with devastating consequences for the region, and beyond. Israel and the Lebanese armed group Hezbollah (backed by Iran) have been trading fire across their shared border for the past nine months.

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New tech aims to keep polar bears and people apart

At the end of the Canadian Arctic summer, polar bears head inland to wait for the ice to form. And while thousands of tourists flock to catch a glimpse of these magnificent predators, researchers are developing novel ways to keep people and bears safely separated.

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Russia antivirus firm Kaspersky quits US after ban

Russian antivirus giant Kaspersky Labs has told BBC News that it is leaving the US after the Biden administration banned sales and distribution of the firm's software.

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Secret 'sky island' rainforest saved by new discoveries

Perched on a remote mountain top and surrounded by lowlands, Mabu is what's known as a "sky island" and is the largest rainforest in southern Africa.

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Cave discovered on Moon could be home for humans

Scientists have for the first time discovered a cave on the Moon. At least 100m deep, it could be an ideal place for humans to build a permanent base, they say.

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Instagram influencer jailed for trafficking and slavery

When two young Brazilian women were reported missing in September 2022, their families and the FBI launched a desperate search across the US to find them. All they knew was that they were living with wellness influencer Kat Torres.

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How conspiracy theories and hate dominated social feeds after assassination attempt on Trump

Within minutes of the news breaking about the assassination attempt on former President Donald Trump, that word was trending on X in the United States. It's a word that has become synonymous with conspiracy theories on the fringes of social media, often to cast doubts on an attack or shooting.

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Spray of bullets shatters nation's illusion of security

They have also torn through the 2024 presidential campaign, damaging the social and cultural fabric of the nation. The illusion of security and safety in American politics – built over decades - has been dramatically shattered.

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Witness says he saw gunman on roof near Trump rally

Greg, the witness, said the man was armed with a rifle and had crawled on top of a building just outside the event in Butler County on Friday evening. He said he pointed the gunman out to police.

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Mystery as 4,000-year-old axe-heads sent to museum

Two axe-heads, which are believed to be more than 4,000 years old, have been sent to the National Museum of Ireland by an anonymous letter writer. Staff at the museum described them as a "significant archaeological find".

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Scientists start human testing of Marburg virus vaccine

Scientists have launched their first in-human vaccine trial for a highly fatal virus. The Marburg virus is in the same family as Ebola and was discovered in 1967.

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Titanic mission to map wreck in greatest ever detail

The BBC has had exclusive access to expedition members here in the US city of Providence, Rhode Island, as they make preparations to leave port. They'll be using state of the art technology to scan every nook and cranny of the famous liner to gain new insights into its sinking.

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US cruise missiles to return to Germany, angering Moscow

Long-range US missiles are to be deployed periodically in Germany from 2026 for the first time since the Cold War, in a decision announced at Nato's 75th anniversary summit.

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The sperm whale 'phonetic alphabet' revealed by AI

Researchers studying sperm whale communication say they've uncovered sophisticated structures similar to those found in human language. But exactly how sperm whales catch squid, like many other areas of their lives, remains a mystery.

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The big fat Indian wedding turning heads around the world

How much is too much? That's the question many in India are asking as the months-long wedding festivities for the youngest son of Asia's richest man enter their final phase.

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A photographer's 11-day trek to flee war-torn Sudan

On the eve of his perilous escape from his home country last month, Sudanese photojournalist Mohamed Zakaria left his camera equipment with a friend, not sure if he would ever see it again.

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Shackleton's Endurance ship gets extra protection

The extended zone will further limit activities close to the vessel, which sank in 1915 during an ill-fated Antarctic expedition led by celebrated polar explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton. The measure is part of a newly published conservation management plan (CMP).

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China’s BYD agrees $1bn Turkey factory deal

China's biggest electric car maker BYD has agreed a $1bn (£780m) deal to build a manufacturing plant in Turkey, as it continues to expand outside its home country. The new plant will be capable of making up to 150,000 vehicles a year, according to Turkish state news agency Anadolu.

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She accused Assange of sexual assault, but is glad he’s now free

Swedish human rights activist Anna Ardin is glad Julian Assange is free. But the claims she has made about him suggest she would have every reason not to wish him well.

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Pope Francis critic excommunicated by the Vatican

An Italian archbishop and staunch critic of Pope Francis has been excommunicated by the Vatican, its doctrinal office has said. Carlo Maria Vigano was found guilty of schism - meaning he has split from the Catholic Church - after years of fierce disagreement with the pontiff.

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India preacher denies blame for crush deaths

The preacher who led an overcrowded prayer meeting in India where more than 120 people were crushed to death on Tuesday has denied blame, and pledged to co-operate with the police investigation.

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An iconic wildlife park has banned koala cuddles. Will others follow?

For what seems like time immemorial, giving a fluffy little koala a cuddle has been an Australian rite of passage for visiting celebrities, tourists and locals alike. And for many of them, a wildlife park in a leafy pocket of Queensland has been the place making dreams come true.

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Japan declares victory in 'war' on floppy disks

It's taken until 2024, but Japan has finally said goodbye to floppy disks. Up until last month, people were still asked to submit documents to the government using the outdated storage devices, with more than 1,000 regulations requiring its use.

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World's oldest cave art found showing humans and pig

The oldest example of figurative cave art has been discovered in the Indonesian Island of Sulawesi by Australian and Indonesian scientists. The painting of a wild pig and three human-like figures is at least 51,200 years old, more than 5,000 years older than the previous oldest cave art.

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A Bugatti car, a first lady and the fake stories aimed at Americans

The following would have been a bombshell report - if it were true. Olena Zelenska, the first lady of Ukraine, allegedly bought a rare Bugatti Tourbillon sports car for 4.5m euros ($4.8m; £3.8m) while visiting Paris for D-Day commemorations in June.

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Pakistan will continue attacks on Afghanistan - minister

Pakistan will continue to launch attacks against Afghanistan as part of a new military operation aimed at countering terrorism, the country's defence minister has told the BBC.

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Israel conscription rule stokes ultra-Orthodox fury

When Israel’s ultra-Orthodox or Haredi Jewish community gathers in force you realise just how large it is.

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How a YouTuber's death boosted fundraising for a rare cancer

The death of Minecraft YouTuber Technoblade two years ago devastated fans across the world. Alex, to use his real name, was just 23 years old.

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Your pictures on the theme of 'shadows'

We asked our readers to send in their best pictures on the theme of "shadows". Here is a selection of the photographs we received from around the world. The next theme is "time" and the deadline for entries is 9 July 2024.

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Why parents are locking themselves in cells at Korean 'happiness factory'

The only thing connecting each tiny room at the Happiness Factory to the outside world is a feeding hole in the door. No phones or laptops are allowed inside these cells, which are no bigger than a store cupboard, and their inhabitants have only bare walls for company.

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Four die after drinking from bottles found in sea

Four Sri Lankan fishermen have died and another two are critically ill after consuming an unknown liquid from bottles they found while at sea, according to local media reports.

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Attempt to fly open basket-balloon across Atlantic abandoned

British explorer Sir David Hempleman-Adams, 67, who lives in Wiltshire, and two friends took off from Presque Isle, Maine, in North America, just after 02:30 UTC [03:30 BST].

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Dying together: Why a happily married couple decided to stop living

Jan and Els were married for almost five decades. In early June, they died together after being given lethal medication by two doctors. In the Netherlands, this is known as duo-euthanasia. It’s legal, and it’s rare - but every year, more Dutch couples choose to end their lives this way.

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Biden stumbles in testy debate where personal attacks fly

Coming into Thursday evening, many Americans had expressed concerns about Joe Biden’s age and fitness for office. To say that this debate did not put those concerns to rest may be one of the greatest understatements of the year.

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BBC tracks down smuggler behind Channel crossing which killed Sara, 7

As he ambled, nonchalantly, across a sunlit public square, the smuggler appeared to have no idea he was being followed.

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Bolivian police arrest leader of apparent coup attempt

Bolivian police have arrested the leader of an apparent attempted coup, hours after the presidential palace in La Paz was stormed by soldiers. Hundreds of troops and armoured vehicles had taken up position on Murillo Square where key government buildings are located.

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Rapport Vlaamse overheid vernietigend voor cyberveiligheid stad Antwerpen vóór grote hack in 2022 : "Onvoldoende maatregelen, pijnlijk voor zo'n grote organisatie"

De stad Antwerpen was amper voorbereid op een grote cyberaanval, zoals die in 2022 gebeurde. Dat blijkt uit een scherp rapport van de Vlaamse Toezichtcommissie voor persoonsgegevens, die openbare besturen controleert over privacy. "Pijnlijk", staat letterlijk in het rapport.

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China space probe returns with rare Moon rocks

China's lunar probe has returned to Earth with the first ever samples from the Moon's unexplored far side. The Chang'e-6 landed in the Inner Mongolia desert on Tuesday, after a nearly two-month long mission that was fraught with risks, state media report.

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Wikileaks founder freed after five years in prison

After a years-long legal saga, Wikileaks says that founder Julian Assange has left the UK after reaching a deal with US authorities that will see him plead guilty to criminal charges and go free. Mr Assange, 52, was charged with conspiracy to obtain and disclose national defence information.

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AI: World's biggest music labels sue over copyright

The world's biggest record labels are suing two artificial intelligence (AI) start-ups over alleged copyright violation in a potentially landmark case.

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World first epilepsy device fitted in UK boy's skull

The neurostimulator, which sends electrical signals deep into his brain, has reduced Oran Knowlson’s daytime seizures by 80%. His mother, Justine, told the BBC he was happier and had a “much better quality of life”.

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What if you drained the oceans?

Get a copy of What If? 2 and Randall’s other books at: https://xkcd.com/books More serious answers to absurd questions at: https://what-if.xkcd.com/ How quickly would the oceans drain if a circular portal 20 meters in diameter appeared at the bottom of Challenger Deep, the deepest spot in the oce

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Three missing in Swiss floods as Alpine resort Zermatt cut off

Three people are missing after floodwaters swept through the south-eastern Swiss town of Misox in the alpine valley of Graubünden. Further west, the alpine resort of Zermatt has been isolated by floodwaters.

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Escaped pet donkey found 'living best life' with elk

Terrie and Dave Drewry, of Auburn, are convinced the animal, filmed by a hiker earlier in June, is their pet "Diesel". Diesel was spooked and took off during a hiking trip with Mr Drewry near Clear Lake, California in 2019.

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Barcelona mayor vows to abolish holiday lets

The mayor of the Spanish city of Barcelona has pledged to eliminate short-term tourist lets in the city within five years. Socialist Jaume Collboni told a news conference he does not plan to renew any of the 10,101 tourist licenses granted to landlords when they expire in November 2028.

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Tourist accused of blasphemy killed by mob in Pakistan

The police had been attempting to protect the man from the large group in the town of Madyan, a town in Swat district. The mob had gathered after the man was accused of desecrating the Quran, Islam's holy book, on Thursday.

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Woman takes partner to tribunal for not taking her to airport

She accused her boyfriend at the time of allegedly breaching a "verbal contract" in which he agreed to take her to the airport, stay in her house and look after her dogs.

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Chimpanzees ‘self-medicate’ with healing plants

Wild chimpanzees eat plants that have pain-relieving and anti-bacterial properties to heal themselves, according to scientists.

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Cargo from 'most ancient' shipwreck found off Israel

Cargo from the remains of the oldest shipwreck to be found in the deep sea has been discovered in the eastern Mediterranean, Israeli archaeologists have said.

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‘Space hairdryer’ regenerates heart tissue in study

Gentle shockwaves could regenerate the heart tissue of patients after bypass surgery, research suggests. Larger trials of the device, dubbed a "space hairdryer" by researchers, are now planned to try to replicate the results in a wider group of patients.

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Putin in Vietnam: A friendship that refuses to die

Russian President Vladimir Putin has arrived in the Vietnamese capital Hanoi on the second stop of an East Asian tour. The trip, which comes on the heels of his lavish visit to North Korea, is being interpreted as a demonstration of the diplomatic support Russia still enjoys in this region.

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Louisiana orders every classroom to display Ten Commandments

Every public school classroom in Louisiana has been ordered to display a poster of the Ten Commandments - a move that civil liberties groups say they will challenge. The Republican-backed measure is the first of its kind in the US, and governs all classrooms up to university level.

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Stonehenge covered in orange paint by Just Stop Oil

Part of Stonehenge has been covered in orange powder paint by protesters. Two Just Stop Oil campaigners sprayed the paint on the historic site near Salisbury, Wiltshire, on Wednesday.

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Mystery monolith appears in Nevada desert

The structure was spotted by the Las Vegas Police Department, who said they saw it during a search and rescue mission north of the Las Vegas Valley. The monolith is similar to other similarly puzzling ones that appeared around the globe in 2020.

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Trappisten uit Westmalle laten uitzonderlijk 2 dagen bezoekers toe in de brouwerij

Op woensdag 25 en donderdag 26 september zullen geïnteresseerden uitzonderlijk de brouwerij kunnen bezoeken van de trappistenabdij in Westmalle. Tot nu toe was die niet te bezoeken, omdat de broeders een stil en teruggetrokken leven willen leiden. Maar omdat er veel vraag was, zullen ze nu 1.

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de unieke Bekaert familie pizza die je nergens elders vindt

Recept voor pizzadeeg en beleg oorspronkelijk van een Italiaanse vriend, in Italie geleerd, maar daarna wat "gepersonaliseerd" : de unieke Bekaert familie pizza die je nergens elders vindt ... (maar dat blijft natuurlijk niet zo nu het recept op youtube staat :-). Philippe, Annelies, Lotte, Fien, E

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Greek coastguard threw migrants overboard to their deaths, witnesses say

The Greek coastguard has caused the deaths of dozens of migrants in the Mediterranean over a three-year period, witnesses say, including nine who were deliberately thrown into the water.

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Historic writer's desk could be 'knackered' old fake

The desk of the writer Dr Samuel Johnson is to be returned to his former London home for the first time in more than 260 years. Except, in a strange twist, its owner is now uncertain whether it really is the desk of the famous 18th Century dictionary author.

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Is It IMPOSSIBLE To Cross The Event Horizon? | Black Hole Firewall Paradox

Check out the Space Time Merch Store https://www.pbsspacetime.com/shop Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime So you’ve decided to jump into a black hole. Good news: as long as the black hole is big enough you can sail through the event

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How gravity batteries could change the world

It may shock you, but on an industrial scale, electricity is rarely generated in reserve. If fuel or water power is used to generate energy, then the process can be regulated and not generate excess electricity. But there is a problem with renewable energy sources. You can't tell the sun "to shine l

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Naked, alone and living on dog food – all for a TV show that gripped a nation

In 1998, a Japanese man was stripped naked and left alone in an almost-empty apartment as part of a challenge for a reality TV show. Tomoaki Hamatsu, known as Nasubi, was left with only a pen, some blank postcards, a telephone and rack full of magazines.

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Is Elon Musk worth his £44bn Tesla pay package?

Elon Musk might, once again, get his own way.

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Daring dives and winter walks: Africa's top shots

On Saturday, this young man jumps into the Nile River to escape the sweltering heatwave sweeping across Egypt. Members of the Dance Centre Kenya (DCK) rehearse on the stage before the opening night of the musical "Cats" in Nairobi on Friday.

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Wild horses return to Golden Steppe after centuries

Wild horses have returned to the Golden Steppe of Kazakhstan for the first time in at least 200 years after a decades-long reintroduction programme.

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The Chinese women dating Dan: An AI boyfriend on ChatGPT

Dan has been described as the “perfect man” who has “no flaws”. He is successful, kind, provides emotional support, always knows just what to say and is available 24/7.

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Explorer Shackleton's last ship found on ocean floor

Wreck hunters have found the ship on which the famous polar explorer Ernest Shackleton made his final voyage. The vessel, called "Quest", has been located on the seafloor off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada.

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Elon Musk unexpectedly drops case against OpenAI

Elon Musk has unexpectedly asked a California court to withdraw a legal case against OpenAI and its boss Sam Altman, which accused them of abandoning the firm's founding mission of developing artificial intelligence (AI) for humanity's benefit.

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Tiger mosquitoes behind dengue fever rise in Europe

An invasive species of mosquito has been found in 13 countries in the EU, including France, Spain and Greece, with experts linking their discovery to a rise in dengue fever in Europe.

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Tesla pay fight tests power of Elon Musk's mystique

In 2018, Tesla shareholders approved the biggest pay package in history for Elon Musk. Six years later, will they do it again? The electric car company will find out this week at its annual meeting, where it is seeking a show of support for the roughly $50bn deal.

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Austria Airlines plane suffers severe damage in hailstorm

An Austrian Airlines plane has been seriously damaged, after it was caught up in an intense hailstorm during a flight on Sunday afternoon.

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Iceland grants whale hunting permits despite animal welfare concerns

Iceland's government has issued a licence to hunt whales to the country's sole whaling company - a move condemned by animal welfare groups. The licence for the 2024 hunting season allows the Hvalur company to kill 128 fin whales.

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Raspberry Pi shares soar on stock market debut

Shares in computer firm Raspberry Pi soared as much as 40% after they began trading on the London Stock Exchange. The Cambridge-based business is known for creating affordable credit card-sized computers designed to boost coding skills among children.

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Banana giant held liable for funding paramilitaries

The group, the United Self-Defence Forces of Colombia (AUC), was designated by the US as a terrorist organisation at the time. The AUC engaged in widespread human rights abuses, including murdering people it suspected of links with left-wing rebels.

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Apple boosts Siri with ChatGPT in AI overhaul

Apple is to boost its Siri voice assistant and operating systems with ChatGPT as it seeks to catch up in the AI race. The iPhone maker announced the Siri makeover along with a number of other new features at its annual developers show on Monday.

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Magnet Fishing

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Widow of IS leader reveals details of their life together

In a rare interview from prison, a widow of the Islamic State group’s leader has shared her account of their life. Umm Hudaifa was the first wife of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and was married to him while he oversaw IS’s brutal rule over large parts of Syria and Iraq.

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Adults and teens turn to 'dumbphones' to cut screen time

Adults and teens concerned about their screen time are turning in their smartphones for “dumber” models. Buried in the settings of many smartphones is the option to look up how much on average you are staring at your phone per day.

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The new language changing the dating scene

Forget wanting to meet someone with a GSOH for some TLC through the local newspaper. Dating apps in the 2020s have borne a whole new dictionary of acronyms and phrases.

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'Spy mania': Why is Russia accusing its own physicists of treason?

Russian President Vladimir Putin frequently boasts that his country is leading the world in developing hypersonic weapons, which travel at more than five times the speed of sound.

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1984: How did the Isle of Jura help shape Orwell's masterpiece?

George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four was published 75 years ago on Saturday. It is the story of Winston Smith, an obedient citizen in an oppressive future state who slowly rebels against the system.

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UK foreign secretary falls victim to hoax video call

UK Foreign Secretary David Cameron engaged in a hoax video call with someone purporting to be the former Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko, the Foreign Office (FCDO) said. The caller also requested contact details, after which Mr Cameron stopped responding.

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Down the Rabbit hole: Pocket-sized AI gadget put to the test

I’ve just spent the past few days with the latest gadget billed as being able to take on the smartphone: the Rabbit R1. You can see the thinking behind it: millions of people have played with AI-powered chatbots like ChatGPT, Claude and Gemini.

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Why is Taylor Swift so big? She 'wants it more than anyone'

The most lucrative concert tour in music history lands in the UK on Friday, when Taylor Swift plays the first of three nights at Edinburgh’s Murrayfield Stadium.

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Scientists enlist AI to interpret meaning of barks

Researchers from the University of Michigan are using artificial intelligence (AI) to better understand what a dog's bark conveys about whether it is feeling playful or angry. They are also digging into whether AI could correctly identify a dog's age, gender and breed based on what it woofs.

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Musk's Starship rocket makes breakthrough ocean landing

Elon Musk's mammoth new rocket system has returned to Earth in a groundbreaking fourth test flight that culminated in a first-ever soft ocean landing for the Starship craft.

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Plans to use Facebook and Instagram posts to train AI criticised

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Hiker finds pipe feeding China's tallest waterfall

The clip has been liked more than 70,000 times since it was first posted on Monday. Operators of the Yuntai tourism park said that they made the "small enhancement" during the dry season so visitors would feel that their trip had been worthwhile.

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How Japan's biggest brewer aims to attract sober Gen Z

For thousands of years, alcohol has been used as a social lubricant. In Japan, it is known as nommunication - a combination of the Japanese word for drink, nomu, and communication. The idea is that drinking alcohol creates a more relaxed environment.

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Einstein's equations and the enigma of wormholes | Janna Levin

Quantum wormholes are mathematically possible — but might also be physically impossible. Physicist Janna Levin explains the wormhole paradox. This interview is an episode from @The-Well, our publication about ideas that inspire a life well-lived, created with the @JohnTempletonFoundation. Subscr

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Can The Faraday Paradox Be Solved?

Get a FREE sample pack with your LMNT order! https://Drinklmnt.com/ActionLab Thank you LMNT for sponsoring this video! Here is a good paper about the paradox and additional experiments where they spin the closing circuit as well. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-022-21155-x

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Nvidia value surges past $3tn and overtakes Apple

Nvidia's market value has surged past $3tn (£2.3tn), lifting the chipmaker ahead of Apple to become the second most valuable publicly listed company in the world. The firm's share price rose more than 5% on Wednesday, to more than $1,224.

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Slovak PM blames shooting on opposition's 'hatred'

Three weeks after Robert Fico was gunned down in central Slovakia, he’s made a full-throated return to political life - on the eve of the European elections.

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Steaming dim sum triumphs among winning food photos

Red Bean Paste Balls, by Chinese photographer Zhonghua Yang, has won the overall prize in the Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year 2024.

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Russia link suspected in Eiffel Tower coffin mystery

French intelligence officials believe Russia is behind a stunt in which five coffins draped in a French flag and bearing the inscription “French soldiers of Ukraine” were deposited near the Eiffel Tower. Three men were seen arriving in a van at about 09:00 (07:00 GMT) on Saturday.

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UK's MI6 recruited Chinese state workers, says China

China has accused UK's Secret Intelligence Service MI6 of recruiting Chinese state employees as spies.

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New York couple find safe containing $100k in lake

James Kane and Barbie Agostini threw a rope with a magnet into a lake in Flushing Meadows Corona Park in Queens on Friday and pulled up the safe. Upon opening the secured box, they said they found it stuffed with bundles of water-damaged $100 bills.

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"Sterrennacht boven de Rhône" van Vincent van Gogh opnieuw te bewonderen in stad waar hij het 136 jaar geleden schilderde : ontdek zijn woelige geschiedenis in Arles

"Sterrennacht boven de Rhône" is voor het eerst teruggekeerd naar de stad waar Vincent van Gogh het in 1888 schilderde. Sinds dit weekend loopt er in Arles een tentoonstelling over de schilder en zijn fascinatie voor de sterren. En Van Gogh en Arles, dat is een bijzonder verhaal.

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New 'Poozeum' displays record fossilised poo haul

The museum in Williams, Arizona - aptly called Poozeum - boasts it houses thousands of fossilised faeces including one of the largest ever found. Founder George Frandsen says he was motivated by the "glaring absence of coprolite [fossilised poop] representation" in museums.

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The American D-Day soldiers who left messages in a castle

Hidden down a dark cellar in the bowels of a centuries-old castle is one of Northern Ireland’s best kept World War Two secrets. For 80 years, its basement walls have been the canvas for hundreds of hand-written messages from American soldiers preparing for D-Day.

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How Scientists Discovered Atoms?

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How Supernovas Act as Universe’s Largest Particle Accelerators

Check out the Space Time Merch Store https://www.pbsspacetime.com/shop Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Cern's Large Hadron Collider routinely collides particles at energies equivalent to a fraction of a second after the Big Bang. If

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China spacecraft to try to land on Moon's far side

The Chang'e 6 mission aims to collect precious rock and soil from this region for the first time in history. The probe could extract some of the Moon's oldest rocks from a huge crater on its South Pole.

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D-Day deception Operation Fortitude: The World War Two army that didn't exist

Eighty years after D-Day, a look at the biggest deception operation of World War Two – the invention of an entirely fake Army group in England, with the film industry creating dummy tanks and decoy aircraft that fooled the Nazis.

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As temperatures in India break records, ancient terracotta air coolers are helping fight extreme heat

In India's scorching summer heat, the ancient practice of chilling water in terracotta pots is inspiring new trends – from cooling towers to screens for buildings. Nandita Iyer hates chilled water.

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Before Goop: How the wellness craze originated in 1970s California

Today, 'wellness' is a huge global industry, associated with expensive products and some dubious scientific claims. But 50 years ago, it was born as a radical project that sought to really rectify the damage done by the modern grind. In 1977 Cyra McFadden published her debut novel The Serial.

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Dinosaur hunter stumbles across million-dollar find

The first stegosaurus skeleton to go under the hammer is set to fetch millions of dollars in New York. But the extraordinary discovery was made by chance, thousands of miles away out west during one man’s birthday stroll, writes Stephen Smith.

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Wordle in legal row with geography spinoff, Worldle

The owner of the hit online game Wordle is legally challenging a geography-based spinoff called Worldle.

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Trump sits motionless as guilty verdict delivered

After several minutes of almost unbearable silence Thursday at Donald Trump's hush-money criminal case, the court officer’s voice rang out loud and clear through the courtroom. She asked the jury to read the verdict. And in a steady, even tone, the foreman began.

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Kenyan climber's body to be left on Everest - family

The body of a Kenyan climber who died on Mt Everest last week will remain on the mountain where he died, his family has said. Joshua Cheruiyot Kirui died while on a daring mission to reach the summit of Mt Everest without supplementary oxygen.

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Why am I dreaming I have an exam I didn't study for?

This time next year, Oluwatosin, 17, will be taking his A-levels at Leeds Sixth Form College. And he knows that as that time approaches, he will have the same recurring nightmare.

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Iceland's Blue Lagoon evacuated as volcano erupts

The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) said the fissure is currently longer than 2.5km (1.5 miles) in length and continuing to grow. Footage from the site shows a wall of molten rock shooting up to a height of 50m, and huge plumes of smoke covering most of the sky.

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North Korea drops trash balloons on the South

North Korea has dropped at least 260 balloons carrying rubbish in the South, prompting authorities to warn its residents to stay indoors.

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US billionaire plans sub trip to Titanic wreck

Ohio tycoon and adventurer Larry Connor and Patrick Lahey, co-founder of Triton Submarines, say they want to take a sub to a depth of around 3,800m (12,467ft) to view the shipwreck in the North Atlantic Ocean.

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'Sextortion guides' sold on social media, BBC finds

Criminals are selling guides on social media on how to carry out sextortion, BBC News has learned. The guides show people how to pose as young women online, trick a victim into sending sexually explicit material and then blackmail them.

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If all humans died, when would the last light go out?

Get a copy of What If? 2 and Randall’s other books at: https://xkcd.com/books More serious answers to absurd questions at: https://what-if.xkcd.com/ If every human somehow simply disappeared from the face of the earth, how long would it be before the last artificial light source would go out? Ra

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Giving babies smooth peanut butter could provide lifelong allergy defence

Giving smooth peanut butter to babies and throughout early childhood could give lifelong protection against peanut allergy, researchers say. Teenagers who ate it up to age five were 71% less likely to develop an allergy than if the food was shunned.

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The satellites using radar to peer at earth in minute detail

Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) allows satellites to bounce radar signals off the ground and interpret the echo – and it can even peer through clouds.

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World's rarest album to go on display in Australia

An album so rare and valuable that only a few ears have ever listened to it is set to go on display at an Australian gallery, giving the public a taste of the uber-exclusive tracks.

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French town reels from fortune teller scandal

The town of Agde on the Mediterranean coast may be known for its beautiful sandy beaches and year-round sun, but it’s also got a reputation for wild sex parties. The town is home to Europe’s biggest swinger community.

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Colombia begins exploring ‘holy grail of shipwrecks’

The Colombian government has started exploring a sunk 18th Century Spanish galleon dubbed the “holy grail of shipwrecks”.

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As Trump trial hurtles towards verdict, are Americans paying attention?

It had all the promise of an only-in-America blockbuster trial, brimming with salacious detail and a former president in the dock.

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PR for pigeons: Woman's mission to give the birds a better image

Gutter birds, sky rats, vermin - pigeons don't have the best reputation, but one woman is on a mission to change that. Hannah Hall explains how she intends to tackle "pigeon prejudice" with a new charity.

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Can Black Holes Unify General Relativity & Quantum Mechanics?

Check out the Space Time Merch Store https://www.pbsspacetime.com/shop Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Black holes are inevitable predictions of general relativity—our best theory of space, time and gravity. But they clash in multi

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Musk opposes US tariffs on Chinese electric cars

Tesla boss Elon Musk says he opposes US tariffs on Chinese electric vehicles (EVs), just days after President Joe Biden quadrupled levies on EVs imported from China.

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The pro-Trump ‘meme team’ behind video referencing ‘Reich’

The campaign attributed its creation to a “random account” and said the staffer who posted it did not notice the words, but its real origin was a trollish collective of online influencers called the Dilley Meme Team.

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Why technology has not transformed building

If you took a worker from a 1920s construction site and transported them to a present day project, they would not be that surprised by what they saw, according to Sam O’Gorman.

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Pope clears way for 'God's influencer' to become a saint

Carlo Acutis died in in 2006, at the age of 15, meaning he would be the first millennial - a person born in the early 1980s to late 1990s - to be canonised. It follows Pope Francis attributing a second miracle to him.

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Why Is The World Rushing Back To The Moon?

Check out the Space Time Merch Store https://www.pbsspacetime.com/shop The Moon has been one of the most important theoretical stepping stones to our understanding of the universe. We’ve long understood that it could also be our literal stepping stone: humanity’s first destination beyond our at

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Scarlett Johansson's AI row has echoes of Silicon Valley's bad old days

Those five words came to symbolise Silicon Valley at its worst - a combination of ruthless ambition and a rather breathtaking arrogance - profit-driven innovation without fear of consequence. I was reminded of that phrase this week when the actor Scarlett Johansson clashed with OpenAI.

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Austrian man discovers mammoth bones in wine cellar

A man who was renovating his wine cellar in Austria has made an extraordinary discovery. It wasn't a vintage red or white - but the remains of prehistoric mammoths.

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UK breakthrough could slash emissions from cement

Scientists say they've found a way to recycle cement from demolished concrete buildings. Cement is the modern world's most common construction material, but it is also a huge source of planet-warming gas emissions.

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Baltic concerns over Russian plan to move sea borders

There have been calls for calm in Finland and the Baltic states after a draft Russian decree proposed revising its borders in the Baltic Sea.

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This Black Hole Could be Bigger Than The Universe

Get your ✨Curiosity Guide✨ now on the kurzgesagt shop here: https://shop.kgs.link/Curiosity and unlock your inner curiosity power! It’s packed with adventures, cute birbs, and all you need to discover new perspectives on the world. Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sou

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US says Russia likely launched anti-satellite weapon

The US says Russia launched a satellite last week which it believes may be capable of attacking other such probes. It was on the "same orbit" as a US government satellite, he said, adding that Washington would continue to monitor the situation and had to be ready to protect its interests.

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My feet and hands were amputated after sepsis, says MP

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Flight turbulence: What is it, when does it happen and why?

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One dead as London-Singapore flight hit by turbulence

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Electric pulses may restore movement in people with broken necks.

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Assange wins right to challenge US extradition

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How can countries deal with falling birth rates?

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Slovakia PM Fico no longer in danger after assassination attempt

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Slovakia at pivotal moment after Robert Fico shooting

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Why the BBC could track down a people-smuggling kingpin before the police

For years, a people smuggler known as Scorpion is believed to have controlled the trade across the English Channel. And yet he remained a free man. Unable to track him down, a Belgian court convicted him in his absence of 121 counts of people-smuggling.

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Interstellar Expansion WITHOUT Faster Than Light Travel

Check Out Space: The Longest Goodbye on the PBS YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MT-pV48XBI4 Watch Space: The Longest Goodbye on Independent Lens: https://pbs.org/longestgoodbye In the far future we may have advanced propulsion technologies like matter-antimatter engines and compac

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Egypt pyramids: Scientists may have solved mystery behind construction

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Vatican tightens rules on supernatural phenomena

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Algerian man found alive after 26 years in neighbour’s cellar

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The man who turned his dead father into a chatbot

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How Robert Fico used Covid and Ukraine to gain power in Slovakia

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Elementary Physics Paths

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David Copperfield: Magician accused of sexual misconduct

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Scientists solve mystery of ancient 'tree of life'

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Slovak PM Robert Fico in hospital after shooting

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China’s spy threat is growing, but the West has struggled to keep up

For years, Western spy agencies have talked of a need to pivot to focus on China. This week, the head of the UK's GCHQ intelligence agency described it as an "epoch-defining challenge". It follows a series of arrests across the West of people accused of spying and hacking for China.

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Millions more middle-aged are obese, study suggests

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'Chinese social media turned me from Ukrainian to Russian'

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Climate change: Last summer hottest in 2,000 years, trees reveal

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Yacht sinks after being rammed by orcas in Strait of Gibraltar

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Romance scam victim fears she will never get £850k back

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Driving PSA

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David McBride: Australian army whistleblower jailed for leaking documents

Amanda SmithA whistleblower who helped expose allegations of Australian war crimes in Afghanistan has been sentenced to five years and eight months in jail.David McBride pleaded guilty to stealing and sharing military secrets on the eve of his trial last year, after legal rulings sank his defence.

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Richard Scolyer: Top doctor remains brain cancer-free after a year

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What are the chances of YOU existing? A biologist explains | Sean B. Carroll

Compare coverage and stay informed on breaking news by subscribing through my link https://ground.news/bigthink to receive 40% off unlimited access through the Vantage subscription. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up

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Changes at Dublin Portal after 'inappropriate behaviour'

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OpenAI’s new model GPT-4o can teach maths and flirt

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Iranian film director Mohammad Rasoulof flees after jail sentence

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Migrant-smuggler known as Scorpion arrested after BBC investigation

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Is social media worth paying for?

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How sci-fi writer JG Ballard's computer poems predicted ChatGPT

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Huyton Firm: Brutal organised crime group brought down by its own text messages

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Google Solar Cycle

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Neom: Forces 'told to kill’ to clear land for eco-city

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Will AI dream up the hit TV shows of the future?

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Physics in the Days of Einstein and Feynman | Freeman Dyson | Big Think

Physics in the Days of Einstein and Feynman New videos DAILY: https://bigth.ink/youtube Join Big Think Edge for exclusive videos: https://bigth.ink/Edge ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Freeman Dyson never spoke to Einstein, but revered him from afa

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What if all the lightning on Earth struck the same place at once?

Get a copy of What If? 2 and Randall’s other books at: https://xkcd.com/books More serious answers to absurd questions at: https://what-if.xkcd.com/ If all the lightning that occurs worldwide on any given day all struck the same place at once, what would happen to that place? Randall Munroe is t

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Malaysia offers 'orangutan diplomacy' for palm oil importers

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North Korea: Kim family's master propagandist dies at 94

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Climate change: World's oceans suffer from record-breaking year of heat

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More than 1,300 bomb threats received by schools across Slovakia

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Smoking is Awesome

Get the exclusive NordVPN deal + 4 months extra here: https://nordvpn.com/kurzgesagt It's risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! Learn how to create positive habits with your very own kurzgesagt Habit Journal. It’s packed with science and plenty of helpful birbs. Only available

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'I don't trust anyone' - How trolling hurt Kipchoge

Two-time Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge says he feared for the lives of his family during a campaign of online abuse that wrongly linked him to the death of fellow Kenyan marathon runner Kelvin Kiptum. Kiptum, the world record holder who looked set to challenge Kipchoge's dominance over 26.

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Photographer David Hurn on cracking Instagram in his 80s

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Starliner: Nasa to fly new Boeing space craft to ISS

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Israeli government blocks Al Jazeera from broadcasting

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North Korean weapons are killing Ukrainians. The implications are far bigger

On 2 January, a young Ukrainian weapons inspector, Khrystyna Kimachuk, got word that an unusual-looking missile had crashed into a building in the city of Kharkiv. She began calling her contacts in the Ukrainian military, desperate to get her hands on it.

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TikTok loves North Korea's latest propaganda bop. Why?

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Have the wheels come off for Tesla?

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China set to launch probe to far side of moon

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How the computer games industry is embracing AI

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WallyGator: Emotional support alligator taken and released in swamp

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“I didn’t expect ChatGPT to get so good” | Unconfuse Me with Bill Gates

If you ask people to name leaders in artificial intelligence, there’s one name you’ll probably hear more than any other: Sam Altman. His team at OpenAI is pushing the boundaries of what AI can do with ChatGPT, and I loved getting to talk to him about what’s next on the sixth episode of my podc

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Wagner in Africa: How the Russian mercenary group has rebranded

Russia is offering governments in Africa a "regime survival package" in exchange for access to strategically important natural resources, a major new report has found.

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Guo Wengui: How a Chinese tycoon built a pro-Trump money machine

When Chinese tycoon and notable dissident Guo Wengui was charged with masterminding a $1bn fraud, it was only the latest chapter in the saga of a man with connections to powerful people in China, the US and the UK.

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What If You Traveled One Billion Years Into the Future?

If you traveled 10,000 years into the future, what would planet Earth look like? Would most of its surface be covered in volcanoes? Or would it be frozen in ice? What if you traveled even further, to one million years in the future? Would all of the oceans have evaporated? Or would it have become on

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Tunnelling through a Mountain - Numberphile

Featuring Professor Hannah Fry - more details on her work below. Check out Brilliant (get 20% off their premium service): https://brilliant.org/numberphile (sponsor) More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ Hannah Fry: https://hannahfry.co.uk Hannah's books: https://amzn.to/3ArNEaA He

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Freeman Dyson: Climate Change Predictions Are "Absurd" | Freeman J. Dyson | Big Think

Freeman Dyson: Climate Change Predictions Are "Absurd" New videos DAILY: https://bigth.ink/youtube Join Big Think Edge for exclusive videos: https://bigth.ink/Edge ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- “We don’t only have to worry about warming,” t

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Why The Ancient Greeks Couldn't See Blue

This BLUE my mind, I just had to share. Check out our podcast channel: https://youtube.com/sidenotepodcast Join our mailing list: https://bit.ly/34fWU27 Written by Mitchell Moffit Editing by Luka Šarlija and Mitchell Moffit FOLLOW US! AsapSCIENCE TikTok: @AsapSCIENCE Instagram: https://instagram

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Wikileaks: Document dumps that shook the world

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange was arrested on Thursday at Ecuador's London embassy, where he had been granted asylum since 2012. The United States alleges that he conspired with Chelsea Manning to access classified information on Department of Defense computers.

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What should you do in a thunderstorm?

Much of the UK has recently been hit by thunderstorms, but what is the best way to stay safe when thunder and lightning hits? Thunderstorms are short, sharp and shocking - for some literally.

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Tanzania and Kenya row over delay to wildebeest migration

Tanzania has denied claims by Kenyan tour operators that it started fires to delay the migration of wildebeest - a key element of the tourism industry. The Kenyans say the fires dispersed wildebeest gathering to migrate from the Serengeti National Park to Kenya's Maasai Mara National Reserve.

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David Copperfield forced to reveal magic trick in court

American magician David Copperfield has been forced to reveal a famous trick after a participant claimed he'd been injured during a Las Vegas performance. British tourist Gavin Cox, 58, filed a negligence lawsuit after falling while participating in the famed magician's "Lucky #13" trick.

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Murder of Ján Kuciak

Ján Kuciak (17 May 1990 – 21 February 2018) was a Slovak investigative journalist. Kuciak worked as a reporter for the news website Aktuality.sk, focused mainly on investigating tax fraud of several businessmen with connections to top-level Slovak politicians.

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Maasai displaced after huts burned in Tanzania

More than 100 Maasai huts in Tanzania have been allegedly burned down by game reserve authorities near the Serengeti National Park. Hundreds of people have reportedly been left homeless by the evacuation of local pastoral communities.

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Slovak election: PM Fico sees Muslim 'threat'

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico is defying EU officials in the migrant crisis - and may win re-election on Saturday. Slovak voters will decide whether to give his Smer-Social Democracy party another four years in office.

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Purgatory

The subject is treated under these heads: I. Catholic Doctrine II. Errors III. Proofs IV. Duration and Nature V. Succouring the Dead VI. Indulgences VII. Invocation of SoulsVIII. Utility of Prayer for the Departed I. CATHOLIC DOCTRINE Purgatory (Lat.

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Robert Fico

Robert Fico (Slovak pronunciation: [ˈrɔbert ˈfitsɔ]; born 15 September 1964) is a Slovak politician currently serving as the Prime Minister of Slovakia since 2023, having served previously from 2006 to 2010 and from 2012 to 2018.

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Was the Milky Way a Quasar?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to: http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE ↓ More info below ↓ Check out Antarctic Extremes on PBS Terra: https://www.youtube.com/pbsterra Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com

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Meet Sophia, World's First AI Humanoid Robot | Tony Robbins

Technology affects every area of our lives and businesses. You can ignore it, resist it and let it become your downfall. Or you can learn how to use technology before it uses you. Learn more at https://www.tonyrobbins.com/podcasts/how-ai-can-boost-your-business and watch this video for a fascinating

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Tim Minchin's Storm the Animated Movie

NOW AVAILABLE AS AN ILLUSTRATED BOOK WITH ALL NEW ART! www.timminchin.com/stormthebook In the confines of a London dinner party, comedian Tim Minchin argues with a hippy named Storm. While Storm herself may not be converted, audiences from London to LA have been won over by Tim's wordplay and the t

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TEDx Brussels 2010 - Frank Tipler - The Ultimate Future

Tulane physicist Frank Tipler committed professional heresy by publishing The Physics of Immortality, a book in which he used the scientific method and the principles of modern physics to lay out what he called a proof for not only the existence of God, but for the resurrection of the dead as descri

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Fuck Me, Ray Bradbury - Rachel Bloom

BUY RACHEL'S ALBUM: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/please-love-me/id648598114 BUY "FUCK ME, RAY BRADBURY" T-SHIRTS: http://www.racheldoesstuff.com/store/ A sexy pop song dedicated to the science fiction/fantasy author, Ray Bradbury. 2011 Hugo Award Nominee for "Best Dramatic Presentation: Short

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Heineken - Walk in Fridge

New Heineken commercial

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Alarm in Israel at reports of possible ICC legal action over Gaza

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Italy bans puppy yoga on animal welfare grounds

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Wild orangutan seen healing his wound with a plant

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Face of 75,000-year-old Neanderthal woman revealed

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Psychics: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Psychics may seem harmless and fun on TV, but they can make a lot of money by exploiting vulnerable people. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/lastweektonight Find Last Week Tonight o

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WhatsApp scam: More than 100 arrested in Spain for ‘son in trouble’ fraud

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Plastic-eating bacteria help waste self-destruct

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Philippines: Sunken old town reappears as dam dries up in record heat

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A little girl said monsters were in her bedroom. It was 60,000 bees

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Secret document says Iran security forces molested and killed teen protester

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UFOs: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

John Oliver explains why we need honest inquiry into UFO sightings, and why those inquiries should be data-driven, fact-based, and – crucially – boring as fuck. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happen

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Roman object that has baffled experts to go on show at Lincoln Museum

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American Airlines keeps mistaking 101-year-old passenger for baby

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Titanic gold pocket watch sells in Wiltshire for £900k

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Boy finds rare Lego octopus on Cornwall beach after 1997 spill

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Tourist fined for approaching walrus in Norway

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Mount Fuji: Iconic view to be blocked in bid to deter tourists

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Hungary opens up to Chinese tech despite protests

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Japan comes face to face with its own space junk

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Indian woman who inhaled nose pin well after surgery

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Conservation slowing biodiversity loss, scientists say

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US Supreme Court divided on whether Trump can be prosecuted

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Arsenic-laced books removed from National Library of France

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Europe at risk of dying faces big decisions - Macron

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Russia vetoes UN vote on stopping arms race in outer space

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One injured after runaway horses seen in central London

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Tesla profits halve, more jobs axed, new models brought forward

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Male hippo in Japan zoo found to be female

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Five dead on migrant boat: 'We saw people struggling on board'

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Voyager-1 sends readable data again from deep space

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How robots are taking over warehouse work

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Three-year-olds groomed online, Internet Watch Foundation warns

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Yale University: Dozens arrested during US Gaza campus protests

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Israel-Gaza: Baby saved from dead mother's womb after Israeli strike

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What the world's media makes of Trump going on trial

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Thousands rally in Spain's Canary Islands against mass tourism

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Quentin Tarantino: Everything we know about his 10th and final film

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What if everyone jumped at once?

Get a copy of What If? 2 and Randall’s other books at: https://xkcd.com/books More serious answers to absurd questions at: https://what-if.xkcd.com/ What would happen if everyone on earth stood as close to each other as they could, jumped, and landed on the ground all at the same instant? Randal

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After their PM halts Ukraine aid, Slovaks dig deep to help

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Infected blood scandal: Children were used as 'guinea pigs' in clinical trials

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Aida Shakarami: Iran morality police arrests dead protester's sister, mother says

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Google sacked staff protesting about contract with Israel

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42 Balloons: New musical follows man who flew over LA in a garden chair

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Police bust global cyber gang accused of industrial-scale fraud

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I thought it was beginner's luck - but I'm a whisky supertaster

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Enormous ancient sea reptile identified from amateur fossil find

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TikTok: EU demands answers on money-for-views version

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Russia's meat grinder soldiers - 50,000 confirmed dead

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'Psychic' conman jailed for swindling 1.3m Americans

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Deadly West Bank settler attacks on Palestinians follow Israeli boy's killing

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The Universe is Full of Aliens!

Go to https://ground.news/nutshell to get 40% off unlimited access to Ground News so you can compare coverage and think critically about the news you read. Get a very special piece of kurzgesagt you can take home (and support our channel in the process!) directly from the kurzgesagt shop here: ht

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Nasa says part of International Space Station crashed into Florida home

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National Conservatism Conference: Police told to shut down right-wing Brussels event

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Iranians on edge as leaders say 'Tel Aviv is our battleground'

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Jeremy Bowen: Iran's attack on Israel offers Netanyahu a lifeline

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Michio Kaku has some news about simulation theory

Sorry, you’re not Neo and this isn’t "The Matrix." Michio Kaku gets real about simulation theory. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, Is reality real? These neuroscientists don’t think so ► https://youtu.

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Why the ultra rich get rich, explained in two charts | Brian Klaas

Why most billionaires aren’t geniuses and most geniuses aren’t billionaires, explained by political scientist Brian Klaas. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, 3 game theory tactics, explained ► https://yout

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What geniuses get wrong about being “smart” | Barbara Oakley

With great genius comes great rigidity. Professor Barabara Oakley on how to stay mentally agile — and get smarter as a result. ❍ Subscribe to The Well on YouTube: https://bit.ly/welcometothewell ❍ Up nextYou have 3 brains. This is how to use them https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A4_GpSok5VI J

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Sydney mall attack: Confronting pro-Kremlin troll on false claims Jewish student was killer

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Sydney church stabbing treated as 'terrorist act'

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Nasa: 'New plan needed to return rocks from Mars'

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Ballistic missiles and drones: What we know about Iran's attack on Israel

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Iran launches drones at Israel in retaliatory attack

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Sydney attack: Typical Saturday of shopping at Westfield turns to horror

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Iranian troops accused of seizing Israel-linked ship

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The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows: Uncommonly Lovely Invented Words for What We Feel but Cannot Name

“Words are events, they do things, change things. They transform both speaker and hearer; they feed energy back and forth and amplify it. They feed understanding or emotion back and forth and amplify it,” Ursula K.

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Ukraine could face defeat in 2024. Here's how that might look

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Germany eases gender change rules

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Brightest ever cosmic explosion solved but new mysteries sparked

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Suicide is on the rise for young Americans, with no clear answers

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Pompeii: Breathtaking new paintings found at ancient city

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Biden 'considering' request to drop Assange charges

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EU approves major reform of migration rules

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PFAS: US limits 'forever chemicals' in tap water for first time

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Was an extinct fox once man's best friend?

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One-Minute Time Machine - The Short Film that (probably) helped Rick & Morty win an Emmy

A short film by Devon Avery and how it came to be: Early in 2012 while working on the CBS TV series NCIS, I approached actor Brian Dietzen about a short film I had written about a One-Minute Time Machine. Brian recommended TV writer Sean Crouch take a look at the script, and he made some big chan

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Types of Eclipse Photo

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How it felt to be targeted in Westminster honeytrap

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Cape Town's digital nomads: Where idyllic lifestyle clashes with local needs

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Pro-Russische kandidaat Peter Pellegrini wint presidentsverkiezingen in Slovakije: "Schok voor het Westen"

In Slovakije heeft de pro-Russische kandidaat Peter Pellegrini de presidentsverkiezingen gewonnen. Hij haalde 55 procent van de stemmen. "De overwinning van Pellegrini komt als een schok voor het Westen", vertelt correspondent Stefan Bos.

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Your pictures on the theme of 'my commute'

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Peter Pellegrini: Russia-friendly populist elected Slovak president

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Christiania: A Copenhagen hippy commune fights back against drug gangs

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A23a: Tracking the world's biggest iceberg as it drifts towards oblivion

The world's biggest iceberg - more than twice the size of Greater London - is on the move. After a few weeks loitering on the fringes of Antarctica, it’s begun to drift at pace once more.

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Brian Cox on quantum computing and black hole physics

“You’re not meant to understand what I just said, because I don’t understand what I just said…” Physicist Brian Cox on one of the most complex theories in space science. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up ne

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What If Gravity is NOT A Fundamental Force? | Entropic Gravity

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime There are four fundamental forces - the strong and weak nuclear forces, electromagnetism

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French pupil dies after being beaten near school

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“Einstein would probably be in an autism program today” | Temple Grandin for Big Think+

Dr. Temple Grandin shares how we can unlock the hidden gifts of neurodivergent minds. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, Master your anxiety. Unleash your genius ► https://youtu.be/CO-6iqCum1w?si=Htqy6wLB4pea4

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What if you swam in a nuclear storage pool?

Get a copy of What If? 2 and Randall’s other books at: https://xkcd.com/books More serious answers to absurd questions at: https://what-if.xkcd.com/ What if I took a swim in a typical spent nuclear fuel pool? Would I need to dive to actually experience a fatal amount of radiation? How long could

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Gaza evacuation warnings from IDF contain many errors, BBC finds

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New cause of asthma damage revealed

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Oldest Christian book goes on sale

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Sunderland boy's message in a bottle found in Denmark

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Alicudi: Island to give away goats that cause chaos

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Climate change: Logging decline after political change in Brazil, Colombia

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White House wants Moon to have its own time zone

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Botswana offers to send 20,000 elephants to Germany

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Dear Future Generations: Sorry (2024)

An Apology Letter to Future Generations. Sorry. 💬TEXT ME: 314-207-4482💬 🔴URGENT: YouTube won’t show you my NEW videos UNLESS you 🔔 TURN ON MY NOTIFICATIONS🔔 🔴SUBSCRIBE ➤ https://bit.ly/31IzLmI ______________________________ SAY HI TO ME ON SOCIAL ▶INSTAGRAM: @Prince_E

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Katchatheevu: Tiny Sri Lankan island sparks political row in India

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'I was deepfaked by my best friend'

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Eclipse Coolness

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Google to delete records from Incognito tracking

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JK Rowling in ‘arrest me’ challenge over Scottish hate crime law

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Cannabis decriminalised in Germany from 1 April

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What is the three-body problem? The chaotic, cosmic mathematics behind the Netflix TV show

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Success or failure? Canada's drug decriminalisation test faces scrutiny

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AI photos show people with secondary breast cancer their lost future

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Periodic Table Regions

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Israel crisis deepens over ultra-Orthodox draft

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Stay! Germany denies reports of sausage dog ban

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Roger Penrose - Did the Universe Begin?

Free access Closer to Truth's library of 5,000+ videos for free: http://bit.ly/376lkKN Some scientists claim that the universe did not have a beginning. Some theologians contend that the universe did not need a beginning. Yet the universe is expanding, and so run the movie in reverse and there seem

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Harvard University removes human skin binding from book

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French school head resigns over Paris veil row and death threats

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Slovakia: Rampaging bear shot dead after injuring five

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Titanic 'door' prop that kept Rose alive sells for $718,750

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Japan nappy maker shifts from babies to adults

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European flying car technology sold to China

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The women behind a fugitive rapist's downfall

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Malaysian convenience store owner charged over 'Allah socks'

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Cern: Scientists search for mysterious ghost particles

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Security law brings Hong Kong's future as business hub into question

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The Jewish settlers who want to build homes in Gaza

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Jasmin Paris first woman to complete gruelling Barkley Marathons race

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Jordan North: How safe is vaping for my health?

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Shootings and a fire reported at Moscow concert hall

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Princess of Wales says she is undergoing cancer treatment

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Why Aren't There Eclipses Every Month?

The moon orbits the earth once per month, which means the moon is on the sun side of the earth every month. So... "why aren't there eclipses every month?" is a question we will answer in this video! This Product is supported by the NASA Heliophysics Education Activation Team (NASA HEAT), part of NA

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Ladakh protests in freezing cold for statehood

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Man 'recovering well' after pig kidney transplant

A 62-year-old man is said to be recovering well and should leave hospital soon, after getting a new kidney from a pig that was genetically modified to reduce the risk of the organ being rejected.US surgeons say Rick Slayman is a "real hero" for trying the pioneering operation.

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Neuralink: Musk's firm says first brain-chip patient plays online chess

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New hope for sisters trapped in their bodies by rare brain condition

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India in undersea race to mine world’s battery metal

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Moon Landing Mission Profiles

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Scientists say they can cut HIV out of cells

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Commercial Bank of Ethiopia glitch lets customers withdraw millions

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Lost and stolen watches more than triple, world's largest database says

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New tree mural in London street prompts Banksy speculation

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Czech Republic struggles to contain surge of whooping cough

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Iceland evacuations as volcano spews lava again

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Woman dies after being chased by bear in Slovakia

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Doctors question science behind blood sugar diet trend

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Harry Potter: Is Miriam Margolyes right that adult fans should 'grow up'?

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Climate change: The 'insane' plan to save the Arctic's sea-ice

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Dark Forest: Should We NOT Contact Aliens?

Check out the Space Time Merch Store https://www.pbsspacetime.com/shop In 1974 we sent the Arecibo radio message towards Messier 13, a globular cluster near the edge of the Milky Way, made up of a few hundred thousand stars. The message was mostly symbolic; we weren’t really expecting a reply. Ye

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How to get the perfect night's sleep

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The battle between farmers in West Bank pitting Israel against the US

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Electoral Bonds: Lottery company among India's top political donors

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A ball of barnacles wins wildlife photo award

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The drug pilots take to stay awake

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Tapeworm eggs in brain linked to undercooked bacon

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Elon Musk's Starship goes 'farther than ever'

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Why life is more interesting with extra pi

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Marlboro firm sells $2.2bn stake in Bud Light owner

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How a 19th-Century portrait of Abraham Lincoln was later revealed to be a fake

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Paul Alexander: 'Man in the iron lung' dies at the age of 78

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Women's fertility is more complicated than you might have heard

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Elihu Yale: The cruel and greedy Yale benefactor who traded in Indian slaves

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Tasseography: The Turkish tradition that's 'as big as Tinder'

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How the hunt for alien life is hotting up

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Airbnb bans indoor security cameras in rental properties

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Boeing whistleblower John Barnett found dead in US

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Trump will not give a penny to Ukraine - Hungary PM Orban

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Switzerland: Six skiers missing in Swiss Alps near Matterhorn

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What a $1 deal says about America's office market

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Tibet boarding schools: China accused of trying to silence language

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IDF completes road across width of Gaza, satellite images show

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Sycamore Gap: New life springs from rescued tree

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The other Oppenheimer story that won't win Oscars

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University of Cambridge Balfour painting damaged by Palestine Action

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US says UFO sightings likely secret military tests

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Pakistan blasphemy: Student sentenced to death over Whatsapp messages

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Production of Duvel beer crippled by cyber-attack

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MH370: The families haunted by one of aviation's greatest mysteries

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Your personal data all over the web - is there a better way?

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US lawmakers quiz Musk's Starlink over Russia claims

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Pornhub challenges EU over online content rules

One of the world's most popular pornography websites, Pornhub, is contesting new EU rules. Pornhub is facing new obligations under the Digital Services Act (DSA), including strict requirements on age verification.

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World's earliest forest discovered, scientists say

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Robot ships: Huge remote controlled vessels are setting sail

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AI can be easily used to make fake election photos - report

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Can the Panama Canal save itself?

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German patient vaccinated against Covid 217 times

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Dinosaur-age 'nightmarish' sea lizard fossil found

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Would a Submarine Work as a Spaceship?

How long could a nuclear submarine last in orbit? Get a copy of What If? 2 and Randall’s other books at: https://xkcd.com/books More serious answers to absurd questions at: https://what-if.xkcd.com/ Randall Munroe is the author of the New York Times bestsellers What If? 2, How To, What If?, and T

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Concern as the gambling industry embraces AI

"I remember setting alarms for 4am on payday, anxiously waiting to gamble as soon as my salary hit my account. By 8am, I found myself seeking loans to survive the month."Danny Cheetham started visiting local bookies aged 18, gambling on the Fixed Odds Betting Terminals (FOBTs).

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ISS launch: New US-Russian crew heads to space station

A SpaceX rocket carrying three US astronauts and one Russian cosmonaut blasted off from Florida on Monday bound for the International Space Station (ISS).

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Star dune: Scientists solve mystery behind Earth's largest desert sands

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What Happens If We Nuke Space?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime EMPs aren’t science fiction. Real militaries are experimenting on real EMP generators,

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Elon Musk sues ChatGPT-maker OpenAI over Microsoft links

Elon Musk is suing OpenAI, the makers of ChatGPT, arguing it has breached the principles he agreed to when he helped found it in 2015. The lawsuit - which has also been filed against OpenAI boss Sam Altman - says the firm has departed from its original non-profit, open source mission.

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More than a billion people obese worldwide, research suggests

More than a billion people are living with obesity around the world, global estimates published in The Lancet show. This includes about 880 million adults and 159 million children, according to 2022 data.

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How ‘flow state’ can heal trauma | Steven Kotler for Big Think

Experiences that put you in a state of flow are shown to override PTSD and heartbreak. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/c/bigthink Up Next ► How to enter ‘flow state’ on command https://youtu.be/znwUCNrjpD4 Flow is an altered state of consciousness in which we

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Should You Walk or Run When It's Cold?

Hi! My name is Henry, I make MinutePhysics, and you can support me on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/minutephysics Is it better to walk or run when it's cold out? If you run, then you have to deal with wind, wind chill, etc, but your body generates more heat. If you stay still, standing or walking

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Call My Cell

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Leap year: French readers enjoy world’s only four-year newspaper

The world's only quadrennial, or four-yearly newspaper, has hit the kiosks again in France with the release of a new issue of the satirical La Bougie du Sapeur. The singularity of the 20-page tabloid is that it comes out only on 29 February - so once every leap-year.

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Ghana passes bill making identifying as LGBTQ+ illegal

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Organiser of 'white party' in Sri Lanka apologises after backlash

An organiser of a "white party" in Sri Lanka has apologised after the event sparked a backlash online. The event's advertisement specified a white dress code, but also had a line saying "Face control: White" - which was largely interpreted to mean the event was open only to white people.

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Why Google's 'woke' AI problem won't be an easy fix

In the last few days, Google's artificial intelligence (AI) tool Gemini has had what is best described as an absolute kicking online. Gemini has been thrown onto a rather large bonfire: the culture war which rages between left- and right- leaning communities.

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Why South Korean women aren't having babies

On a rainy Tuesday afternoon, Yejin is cooking lunch for her friends at her apartment, where she lives alone on the outskirts of Seoul, happily single. While they eat, one of them pulls up a well-worn meme of a cartoon dinosaur on her phone. "Be careful," the dinosaur says.

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Nato allies reject Emmanuel Macron idea of troops to Ukraine

Several Nato countries, including the US, Germany and the UK, have ruled out deploying ground troops to Ukraine, after French President Emmanuel Macron said "nothing should be excluded". Mr Macron said there was "no consensus" on sending Western soldiers to Ukraine.

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The Paradox of an Infinite Universe

Go to https://brilliant.org/nutshell/ to dive deeper into these topics and more with a free 30-day trial + 20% off for the first 200 people! This video was sponsored by Brilliant. Thanks a lot for the support! Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources-infinite-universe/ Wha

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Climate change: 'Ice bumps' reveal history of Antarctic melting

Scientists say they now have a better idea of exactly where and when the margin of Antarctica started melting. They've traced the changing shapes of bumps on the ice surface that mark locations where glaciers are anchored in place.

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Why firms are racing to produce green ammonia

In the 19th Century, Europeans realised what the Inca had known long before. Bird droppings, or guano, made a fantastic fertiliser. And so sprung up a gigantic industry dedicated to the harvesting of guano from Latin American bird colonies, where there were huge piles off the stuff.

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Missing US couple on hijacked boat feared killed

A US couple whose boat was hijacked in the Caribbean last week likely died after being thrown into the sea, according to police in Grenada. Ralph Hendry, 66 and his wife Kathy Brandel, 71, both pensioners, have been missing since their catamaran was taken by three men on 19 February.

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Burkina Faso mosque attack: Dozens killed during prayers

Dozens of people have been shot dead at a mosque on the same day that a church was attacked, say the authorities in Burkina Faso. It was during morning prayers that the gunmen surrounded the mosque in Natiaboani town.

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Charity Atlantic rower Michael Holt found dead on boat

Michael Holt from Porthmadog, Gwynedd, left Gran Canaria on 27 January with the goal to reach Barbados in the Caribbean and help two charities. But some 700 miles in, Mr Holt, who had type 1 diabetes, fell ill.

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Mary Poppins film age rating raised over 'discriminatory language'

Mary Poppins, the classic film starring Julie Andrews, has had its age rating raised by British film censors because it features "discriminatory language". The 1964 film has been reclassified from a U, which stands for universal, to a PG, for parental guidance.

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Alexei Navalny: Putin critic about to be freed in prisoner swap when he died, says ally

Alexei Navalny was about to be freed in a prisoner swap when he died, according to his ally Maria Pevchik. She said the Russian opposition leader was going to be exchanged for Vadim Krasikov, a Russian hitman who is serving a life sentence for murder in Germany.

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India ICICI bank: 'My bank manager stole $1.9m from my account'

An Indian woman has accused a manager at one of the country's largest banks of defrauding her by siphoning off 160m rupees ($1.9m; £1.5m) from her account. Shveta Sharma says she had transferred money to the ICICI bank from her US account, expecting it to be invested in fixed deposits.

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Inside the long-abandoned tunnel beneath the Clyde

Deep below the River Clyde lies a once bustling thoroughfare that only a select few are now allowed to enter. Two circular rotunda buildings, one of the them in the shadow of Glasgow's famous Finnieston Crane, mark the exit and entry points for a long-abandoned Victorian tunnel.

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Your pictures on the theme of 'on the horizon'

We asked our readers to send in their best pictures on the theme of "on the horizon". Here is a selection of the photographs we received from around the world. The next theme is "speed" and the deadline for entries is 5 March 2024.

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Japan naked festival: Women join Hadaka Matsuri for first time

The sea of chanting, nearly-naked men tussle, push and shove towards the shrine. "Washoi! Washoi!" they yell - let's go, let's go. It is scene that has barely changed in the 1,250 years the Hadaka Matsuri, or the Naked Festival, has been taking place at the Konomiya Shrine, in central Japan.

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Eight of the world's most remarkable homes

From Jaipur to Whistler, eight extraordinary, award-winning houses that are both beautiful and low-energy. "Passive home" design is all about low-energy building made to exploit passive solar energy and establish a comfortable indoor temperature with a low-energy requirement for heating or cooling.

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Orbital Argument

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Piers Morgan and Oprah Winfrey 'deepfaked' for US influencer's ads

Celebrities including Piers Morgan, Nigella Lawson and Oprah Winfrey have criticised the use of AI deepfake online adverts that gave the false impression they had endorsed a US influencer's controversial self-help course.

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Husband 'made over a million' by eavesdropping on BP wife

The husband of a BP employee has been charged with insider trading in the US following claims he overheard details of calls made by his wife while working from home. The US Securities and Exchange Commission alleged Tyler Loudon made $1.76m (£1.39m) in illegal profits.

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Germany legalises cannabis, but makes it hard to buy

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Tracking down the last survivors of the Bengal famine

The Bengal famine of 1943 killed more than three million people in eastern India. It was one of the worst losses of civilian life on the Allied side in World War Two. There is no memorial, museum, or even a plaque, anywhere in the world to the people who died.

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West Bengal: India court asks for lions’ name change as Hindu sentiments hurt

An Indian court has ordered a zoo in West Bengal state to change the names of two lions after a hardline Hindu group complained it hurt their religious sentiments. The lioness was named after Hindu deity Sita while the lion was called Akbar, after the 16th Century Mughal ruler.

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Intuitive Machines: US company makes historic Moon landing

An American company has made history by becoming the first commercial outfit to put a spacecraft on the Moon. Houston-based Intuitive Machines landed its Odysseus robot near the lunar south pole.

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What if Singularities DO NOT Exist?

Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord & 10% Off All Merch! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime It's not too often that a giant of physics threatens to overturn an idea held to be self-evident by generations of physicists. Well, that may be the fate of the famous Penrose Singul

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'I'm sad for everyone who's been killed': How two years of war in Ukraine changed Russia

As I stood watching Russians laying flowers in memory of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, a young man shared his reaction to Mr Navalny's death in prison.

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Kelvin Kiptum burial: Widow of Kenya's marathon legend mourns 'joker and hero'

Kelvin Kiptum, the athlete who is being buried on Friday in a small village in western Kenya, is remembered by those who loved him as a joker - as well as a young man with incredible drive, determined to help those who sacrificed so much for him to be able to break the marathon world record last yea

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Alabama IVF ruling: What does it mean for fertility patients?

A ruling from the Alabama Supreme Court that frozen embryos are considered children, and that a person could be held liable for accidentally destroying them, has opened up a new front in the US battle over reproductive medicine.

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Afghanistan: Archaeological sites 'bulldozed for looting'

Dozens of archaeological sites in Afghanistan have been bulldozed to allow systematic looting, according to researchers at Chicago University.

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FBI launches probe into church investigated by BBC

The FBI has launched a probe into a secretive Christian church that was the focus of a recent BBC investigation. The church has no official name but is often referred to as The Truth or the Two by Twos.

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ChatGPT goes temporarily “insane” with unexpected outputs, spooking users

On Tuesday, ChatGPT users began reporting unexpected outputs from OpenAI's AI assistant, flooding the r/ChatGPT Reddit sub with reports of the AI assistant "having a stroke," "going insane," "rambling," and "losing it.

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'Dad, please don't go out': The Gazans killed as Israel freed hostages

When Israeli special forces rescued two of the hostages kidnapped by Hamas, there was relief for their families and a boost for national morale. But the rescue on 12 February has left angry feelings in Gaza, where more than 70 people were reported killed on the night.

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Trident missile test fails for second time in a row

The test firing of a Trident missile from a Royal Navy submarine has failed, for the second time in a row. The latest test was carried out from HMS Vanguard off the east coast of the United States.

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Handwritten Hotel California lyrics at centre of trial

Handwritten pages inscribed with the first known iterations of legendary rock song Hotel California will take centre stage at a criminal trial on Wednesday.

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Space debris: 'Grandfather satellite' due to fall to Earth

ERS-2 was a cutting-edge observation platform when it launched in 1995, forging technologies that are now used routinely to monitor the planet. It's been gradually descending since ending operations in 2011 and will take an uncontrolled, fiery plunge into the atmosphere sometime on Wednesday.

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Our Secret Fantasies

There’s a lot constantly going in the fantasy part of our minds that sounds pretty strange and at times, frankly, shocking. But coming to terms with our fantasies – and realising they are not our reality – belongs to the art of knowing how to live more easily with ourselves. Enjoying our Yo

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Ruby Franke: Parenting advice YouTuber given maximum sentence for child abuse

A Utah woman, whose harsh parenting advice built her a massive YouTube following, has been sentenced to four to 60 years in prison.Ruby Franke, 42, previously pleaded guilty to accusations of starving and abusing her children.

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Tinder introduces passport-scanning ID checks for UK users

Tinder is introducing enhanced identity checks for UK users, involving a passport or driver's licence being checked against a video selfie. Anyone who signs up to the voluntary scheme will get an icon on their profile, verifying their age and likeness is authentic.

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Intruder spills 60,000 litres of wine worth €2.5m at Spanish winery

A Spanish winery has suffered losses of more than €2.5 million (£2.1 million) after an unidentified intruder emptied 60,000 litres of wine.A representative of the Cepa 21 winery told the BBC the wine spilled came from two of the winery's most expensive varieties, Horcajo and Malabrigo.

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Putin gifts luxury Aurus car to North Korea's Kim

Russian President Vladimir Putin has given North Korean leader Kim Jong Un a luxury Russian-made car. Pyongyang's state media said the limousine was delivered to Mr Kim's top aides on Sunday.

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Brightest and hungriest black hole ever detected

The most luminous object ever detected has been spied in the distant Universe. It's a quasar - the bright core of a galaxy that is powered by a gargantuan black hole some 17 billion times the mass of our Sun.

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Lion kills zookeeper at Nigeria's Obafemi Awolowo University

A zookeeper at a Nigerian university has been killed by one of the lions he had been looking after for close to a decade.Olabode Olawuyi, who was in charge of the Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU) zoo, was attacked as he was feeding the lions, the OAU said.

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Powerball: US man sues lottery after being told $340m win is error

A Washington DC man who thought he won a jackpot worth $340m (£270m) has sued Powerball and the DC Lottery, who claim they published his numbers by mistake.John Cheeks said he felt "numb" when he first saw Powerball's winning numbers matched his ticket in January 2023.

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How your genes can help you run better

For some, running comes naturally, but for others, every small gain in speed or distance can feel like a battle. Either way, you might be wondering, "Am I born to run?" The answer could be in your genes. Just the rush of wind, a dirt track and my own pounding footsteps.

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Walkers forced to trespass onto open access countryside

Walkers are being shut out of 2,500 landscapes and beauty spots where there is a right to roam but no legal right to access them, campaigners say. In England, 8% of land is designated "open country" but researchers found 2,700 hectares surrounded by private land with no public right of way.

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Michael J Fox brings people to tears in Baftas surprise appearance

This article contains content provided by Twitter. We ask for your permission before anything is loaded, as they may be using cookies and other technologies. You may want to read Twitter’s cookie policy and privacy policy before accepting.

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British Museum facing social media campaign to return Easter Island statue

The British Museum has been subject to a campaign by social media users in Chile demanding the return of a stone monument taken from Easter Island. The museum has two moai statues which were taken from the Chilean territory of Rapa Nui, or Easter Island, in 1868.

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No discussion over Falklands, says Lord Cameron ahead of visit

The sovereignty of the Falkland Islands will not be up for discussion as long as they want to remain a British territory, Lord Cameron has said. The foreign secretary is preparing to make the first visit to the islands by a cabinet minister since 2016.

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Ridge Alkonis: The sailor who stoked Japanese resentment against the US

When the story of Ridge Alkonis first broke on 29 May 2021, it did not initially attract much attention in Japan. The US Navy officer had killed two Japanese citizens in a car accident during a trip to Mount Fuji - the victims were an 85-year-old woman and her son-in-law, aged 54.

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Conjoined twins given days to live are proving everyone wrong

Marieme and Ndeye were not expected to survive for more than a few days when they were born. Now aged seven, they are thought to be the only growing conjoined twins in Europe.

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Diego Garcia asylum seekers feel unsafe on remote British island territory

A group of asylum seekers on an isolated British island territory have told UN investigators they feel unsafe and forgotten, as they reported sexual assaults and harassment of children, as well as self-harm and suicide attempts.

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Donald Trump hit where it hurts most in New York fraud ruling

Donald Trump's latest legal loss hits him where it hurts most because it takes aim at his very identity. For decades, he has marketed himself as a genius business mogul who made it big in one of the world's most cut-throat cities.

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Biofluorescence: Unseen world of the Celtic rainforest revealed by UV

An eerie glow has been emanating from Wales' forests and rockpools for the country's annual dark skies week. David Atthowe, a nature guide from Norwich, was invited to shine his ultraviolet (UV) torches on some of the best nature spots in Pembrokeshire and Monmouthshire.

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Treasure Chests

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Texas zoo delivers baby gorilla via caesarean section

A premature baby gorilla was delivered via emergency caesarean section at a US zoo after its mother suffered from a medical issue called preeclampsia. The "historic and emotional" birth of Jameela was documented by the Fort Worth Zoo on its Facebook page.

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The day I found out I had special 'neo' blood

I have always been proud of donating blood. I have a relatively rare blood type (B-) and recently found out my blood is even more precious to the NHS, because it can be given to newborn babies.

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'Zombie Fires' burning at an alarming rate in Canada

Even in the dead of Canada's winter, the embers of last year's record-setting wildfire season remain. So-called "zombie fires" are burning under thick layers of snow at an unprecedented rate, raising fears about what the coming summer may bring.

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What we know about reports of Alexei Navalny's death in Arctic Circle prison

According to Russian accounts, Alexei Navalny took a short walk at his Siberian penal colony, said he felt unwell, then collapsed and never regained consciousness. He was 47 years old.

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Moon Race 2.0: Why so many nations and private companies are aiming for lunar landings

Five decades on from the last of the Apollo missions, the Moon is once again a target for space exploration. But Nasa no longer has lunar exploration to itself. The number of astronauts who walked on the Moon hasn't changed in over 50 years.

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Russian opposition leader Navalny has died, prison service says

This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version. You can receive Breaking News on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts.

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Kazakhstan: Methane mega-leak went on for months

One of the worst methane leaks ever recorded took place last year at a remote well in Kazakhstan, new analysis shared with BBC Verify has shown. It is estimated that 127,000 tonnes of the gas escaped when a blowout started a fire that raged for over six months.

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Why Scientists Think We Might Live Inside a Black Hole

Why Scientists Think we Might Live Inside a Black Hole Join world-renowned physicists Brian Greene and Brian Cox as they delve into one of the most intriguing questions of our universe: Could we be living inside a black hole? This groundbreaking video explores the cutting-edge theories and astoun

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UV light kills viruses. Why isn't it everywhere?

The promise and pitfalls of using light to stop germs. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When you think of disinfecting a space, what comes to mind? Wipes? Gels? Sprays? Maybe air purifiers or effective HVAC systems? All of these are great defenses against viruses and bacteria, but on

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Why confirmation bias kills your brain | Barbara Oakley

Humans tend to hunker down in our own minds and trust what we already believe to be true. This emotion-based way of thought isn't often the best way to think about anything, and often leads to gridlock. ❍ Subscribe to The Well on YouTube: https://bit.ly/welcometothewell ❍ Up next: 95% of your

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Paul McCartney reunited with guitar stolen 51 years ago

Paul McCartney has been reunited with the bass guitar he used on Beatles hits including Love Me Do and She Loves You, 51 years after it was stolen from the back of a van in London. The Hofner bass was found in the attic of a man in Sussex thanks to a search by a project called the Lost Bass.

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Brazil's heart-breaking site of two million enslaved Africans

Rio de Janeiro was once the world's largest slave city – and a walking tour through its "Little Africa" region is the best way to explore the history that shaped Brazil's national identity.

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Why insects are drawn to artificial light at night

New research finds that artificial lights confuse rather than attract insects. High up in the mountains of Monteverde, Costa Rica, a team of researchers lug heavy equipment including two high-speed cameras deep into a dream-like cloud forest.

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The childhood WW2 trauma that inspired Yoko Ono

As a major retrospective of the conceptual artist's work opens, her son Sean Ono Lennon talks about her art – and her collaborations with his father, John Lennon.

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Coming face to face with inmates in El Salvador's mega-jail

Hundreds of eyes are upon us. With shaven heads, dressed in pristine white, and heavily tattooed, the prisoners know they are being watched and return the gaze from the other side of the bars.

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Julian Assange: Australian politicians call for release of WikiLeaks founder

Australia's parliament has passed a motion calling on the US and UK to release Julian Assange, ahead of a crucial legal hearing. Mr Assange will appear in front of the UK's High Court next week for his final appeal against US extradition.

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Swatting call an 'assassination attempt', says politician

On Christmas Day last year, Republican Congressman Brandon Williams was enjoying exchanging gifts with his family when a call came in on his cell phone. At first, he didn't recognise the number, so ignored it.

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Scientists grow 'meaty' rice hybrid food for protein kick

Scientists have created a new type of hybrid food - a "meaty" rice that they say could offer an affordable and eco-friendly source of protein. The porous grains are packed with beef muscle and fat cells, grown in the lab.

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Mappa Mundi: The greatest medieval map in the world

From a small island in the Venetian lagoon, a 15th-Century monk somehow designed an astonishingly accurate planisphere of the world.

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Valentine's Day: The interspecies relationships that evolved in nature

From bats and carnivorous plants to crocodiles and birds, nature is full of remarkable pairings that depend on each other to survive. A green-brown spongy sludge congregates en masse across the surface of the Everglades' shallow marshes in southern Florida.

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Bali: Foreign tourists to pay $10 entry tax from Valentine's Day

Foreign tourists must now pay a 150,000 rupiah (£7.60; $9.60) levy to enter Bali, one of the world's most popular tourist destinations. Indonesian authorities say this is aimed at protecting the island's environment and culture.

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Canterbury disco: 'Parties can get more people to visit church'

When you think of a church or cathedral, the thing that might come to mind is it being a place and time for self-reflection. But lately there have been a series of silent discos taking place in cathedrals and historic buildings around the UK and Europe.

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Swiss antisemitism shock at Davos shop sign saying no skis for Jews

Swiss police have opened an investigation into a ski hire shop's announcement it would no longer rent skis and sledges to Jewish customers. The shop, in the famous resort of Davos, has now reversed its decision.

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Has the sexual revolution backfired? | Louise Perry

Sexual attitudes are more man-like than ever. Author Louise Perry explains what that means for women. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, The science of sex, love, attraction, and obsession ► https://youtu.be/1

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Is monogamy good for society? | Louise Perry

Is polygamy good for society? Author Louise Perry explains. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, The science of sex, love, attraction, and obsession ► https://youtu.be/1XmoMrbcV0E What is the future of romantic

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Kenya's Kelvin Kiptum: Marathon world record holder dies in road accident

The men's marathon world record holder, Kenya's Kelvin Kiptum, 24, has died in a road accident in his home country, a Kenyan athletics official has confirmed to the BBC. He was travelling in a vehicle on a road near the town of Eldoret, close to where he had been training.

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The lost art of the death mask

The Western world was once obsessed with these macabre memorials. On 7 May 1821, two doctors were engrossed in a frantic search. There was a decomposing body at stake – and if they didn't find some plaster soon, its features would be lost forever.

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Trump says he would 'encourage' Russia to attack Nato allies who don't pay their bills

Donald Trump says he would "encourage" Russia to attack any Nato member that fails to pay its bills as part of the Western military alliance.

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Is Iceland entering a new volcanic era?

This week, Iceland woke up to yet another day of fire, as towering fountains of lava lit up the dark morning sky.

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World record for matchstick Eiffel Tower after U-turn

A model of the Eiffel Tower has been officially deemed the world's tallest matchstick building a day after being ruled out by Guinness World Records (GWR).The 7.19m (23ft) tower had been disqualified on Wednesday for being made out of the wrong type of matches.

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'They've both got pyramids': Biden gaffe sparks memes

Egypt and Mexico are separated by thousands of miles of ocean and desert, with vastly different languages, cuisines, politics and cultures.

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Tucker Carlson interview: Fact-checking Putin's 'nonsense' history

US talk show host Tucker Carlson's interview with Russian President Vladimir Putin began with a rambling half-hour lecture on the history of Russia and Ukraine.

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James Magnussen to make swimming 'world record' attempt taking banned drugs

Ex-world champion James Magnussen says he will take banned drugs in an attempt to swim faster than a world record. The Australian, 32, will come out of retirement to compete in the Enhanced Games, where doping is allowed.

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Why the e-bike boom is raising fire fears

When Ollie, a delivery rider in York, England, got his first e-bike in 2022, it was a bit of a splurge. He bought it at a discounted rate negotiated by his delivery company. Even with the discount, it set him back £1,000.

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Putin interview released by ex-Fox host Tucker Carlson

Conservative US media personality Tucker Carlson has released a controversial interview with Russian President Vladimir Putin. The more than two-hour video was filmed in Moscow on Tuesday, Carlson said.

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State of emergency declared in Iceland after volcanic eruption

Thousands of people in the Reykjanes Peninsula have been urged to limit their hot water and electricity use as the pipes could take days to fix. There are concerns that other crucial pipelines close to the Svartsengi power station could be affected if the lava flow does not ease soon.

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World record for energy from nuclear fusion set

A new world record for energy generated by nuclear fusion - the process that powers the stars - has been set at the UK-based JET laboratory.Nuclear fusion is considered the holy grail of energy as it could potentially produce vast amounts of clean power.

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Men on Viagra may reduce their Alzheimer's risk - study

Men who take drugs for erectile dysfunction, such as Viagra, may reduce their risk of Alzheimer's disease, a study suggests. In research on more than 260,000 men, those taking the drugs were 18% less likely to develop the dementia-causing condition.

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Trapped orcas escape from drift ice near Japan

A pod of around a dozen killer whales trapped by drift ice in waters off Japan's northern island appear to have successfully escaped, officials say.The stranded orcas were spotted by a fisherman earlier this week, almost one kilometre off Hokkaido.

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Taylor Swift threatens to sue student who tracks her private jet

Taylor Swift's lawyers have threatened to sue a student who tracks the private jets of celebrities, including the singer, and shares it online. Jack Sweeney, using publicly available data, tracks the take offs and landings of planes belonging to the wealthy and posts them one day later.

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Wildlife Photographer of the Year People's Choice Award winner

A stunning image of a young polar bear drifting to sleep on an iceberg, by British amateur photographer Nima Sarikhani, has won the Wildlife Photographer of the Year People's Choice Award.

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Donald Trump does not have presidential immunity, US court rules

Donald Trump does not have presidential immunity and can be prosecuted on charges of plotting to overturn the 2020 election, a US court has ruled. Mr Trump had claimed in the landmark legal case that he was immune from criminal charges for acts he said fell within his duties as president.

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Paul Mackenzie: Kenyan cult leader charged with 191 murders

A cult leader in Kenya has been charged with murder after more than 400 bodies were found buried in shallow graves in a remote forest in the east of the country. Survivors and victims' families have said Paul Mackenzie urged followers to fast in order to "go see Jesus".

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Sri Lanka: What's killing so many of the country's iconic elephants?

Sumitra Malkandi breaks down as she recounts the fateful evening in March last year when her husband was trampled to death. She was busy in the kitchen - the couple lived in a farming village in central Sri Lanka - and her husband, Thilak Kumara, was just outside feeding their cows.

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John Cage: Organ playing 639-year-long piece changes chord

The longest - and slowest - music composition in existence had a big day on Monday - it changed chord for the first time in two years. Crowds gathered at a church in Germany to witness the rare moment, which is part of an artistic feat by avant-garde composer, John Cage.

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King diagnosed with cancer, Buckingham Palace says

King Charles has been diagnosed with a form of cancer, says Buckingham Palace. The type of cancer has not been revealed - it is not prostate cancer, but was discovered during his recent treatment for an enlarged prostate.

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Relationship Advice

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Zanzibar beer: Alcohol shortage hits Tanzania's spice islands

The spice islands of Zanzibar are facing a shortage of alcohol which threatens the tourism sector of one of Africa's top travel destinations. Tourism generates about 90% of the Tanzanian archipelago's foreign revenue.

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How one great sweater can last a lifetime

The Dude, Taylor Swift and Harry Styles all have their favourites. But what is the perfect jumper – Celtic classic, Cowichan knit or "extreme cashmere"? In the new Netflix comedy Good Grief, Emma Corrin knits a jumper in a London gallery while art patrons stare, transfixed.

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Poonam Pandey: Fake cancer death of India actress sparks ethics debate

A social media post claiming that an Indian actress had died due to cervical cancer and a subsequent video announcing that she was alive has sparked a furious debate on the ethical conundrums surrounding online publicity campaigns.

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Huge atom-smasher bid to find missing 95% of Universe

Researchers at the world's biggest particle accelerator in Switzerland have submitted proposals for a new, much larger, supercollider. Its aim is to discover new particles that would revolutionise physics and lead to a more complete understanding of how the Universe works.

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Are Room Temperature Superconductors IMPOSSIBLE?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Superconductive materials seem miraculous. Their resistanceless flow of electricity has

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How the codpiece flopped

Some codpieces had cute little bows on them. Some time around 1536, Hans Holbein the Younger was finessing Henry VIII's crotch.

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Tryfan: Woman scattering dad's ashes rescued on mountain

Scattering her dad's ashes on one of the UK's most recognisable peaks almost ended in tragedy for Kitty Harrison. She had just given her father Steve Parry an emotional send-off on the summit of Tryfan, one of Wales' highest mountains, when she slipped.

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Great escapes: How WW2 captives found a glint of light

During World War Two, hundreds of thousands of people were held against their will. Service personnel captured in conflict became prisoners of war, and civilians were confined in internment camps if they were believed to be a threat to the state.

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Inert nuclear missile found in US man's garage

Police in Washington state say an old rusted rocket found in a local man's garage is an inert nuclear missile. On Wednesday, a military museum in Ohio called police in the city of Bellevue to report an offer of a rather unusual donation.

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What we know about US retaliatory strikes in Iraq and Syria

US forces have bombed 85 targets in Iraq and Syria as retaliation for an attack that killed three US troops at a base in northern Jordan last month. According to US officials, the co-ordinated attack was against Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) Quds Force and allied militia groups.

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Should we fear an attack of the voice clones?

"It's important that you save your vote for the November election," the recorded message told prospective voters last month, ahead of a New Hampshire Democratic primary election. It sounded a lot like the President.

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Locals try to uncover story of mysterious Canada shipwreck

Locals in Newfoundland, Canada, are enthralled by a mysterious shipwreck that washed up on shore. Wanda Blackmore said her son was out sea duck hunting when he stumbled upon the 24-meter long, wooden ship that likely dates back to the 19th Century.

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Richard Scolyer: Melanoma doctor's high-stakes gamble to cure his brain cancer

On opposite sides of the world, Richard Scolyer and Georgina Long each took one look at a scan and their hearts sank. In front of them was, to the untrained eye, an innocuous-looking brain.

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Basisschool Zavelberg in Berchem krijgt 7,5 miljoen euro voor renovatie

Voor de renovatie- en nieuwbouwwerken wordt het kinderdagverblijf van de school, vandaag in bouwvallige staat, gesloopt. Er komt een nieuwbouw voor in de plaats met een geïntegreerd kinderdagverblijf en turnzaal.

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Brussels Gewest financiert opleiding van 8 allochtone werklozen tot kleuterleider: "Mijn passie, maar ik had hulp nodig"

De kindjes van de eerste kleuterklas in basisschool Zavelberg in Sint-Agatha-Berchem krijgen een tweede juf: voortaan loopt Sara in hun klas drie dagen per week stage. Juf Jolien begeleidt haar. De andere twee dagen krijgt Sara les in de Erasmushogeschool in Brussel.

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Greenhouse Effect

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Segun Aremu: Nigerian traditional monarch shot dead and wife kidnapped

Armed men have shot dead a traditional ruler, and kidnapped his wife plus one other person in south-western Nigeria, authorities say. The attackers stormed the palace of Segun Aremu - a retired army general and monarch whose official title is the Olukoro of Koro - on Thursday night.

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Good sex explained in 9 minutes | Dr. Emily Nagoski

We’ve operated on a 4-phase model for sex therapy since the ‘60s. “Virtually everything” was wrong with that, according to Dr. Emily Nagoski. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, Has the sexual revolution

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Western officials in protest over Israel Gaza policy

More than 800 serving officials in the US and Europe have signed a statement warning that their own governments' policies on the Israel-Gaza war could amount to "grave violations of international law".

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Canadian 'poison killer' Kenneth Law to head straight to trial

The case of a Canadian man accused of supplying a poisonous chemical to people who died by suicide will head straight to trial, an Ontario court decided this week. Prosecutors have also upgraded the charges against Kenneth Law from second-degree to first-degree murder.

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Joshua Schulte: Former CIA hacker sentenced to 40 years in prison

A former CIA officer has been sentenced to 40 years in prison for leaking a trove of classified hacking tools to whistle-blowing platform Wikileaks.Joshua Schulte was also found guilty of possessing child pornography.

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A US engineer had a shocking plan to improve the climate – burn all coal on Earth

Less than a century ago, people believed setting alight every coal mine on the planet would be good for the climate. The fact we've come so far in our understanding since then provides hope for the future, argues historian Thomas Moynihan.

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Ukraine 'hits Russian missile boat Ivanovets in Black Sea'

Ukrainian forces say they have destroyed a Russian missile boat from the Black Sea Fleet in a special operation off Russian-occupied Crimea. The Ivanovets - a small warship - received "direct hits to the hull" overnight, after which it sank, military intelligence said.

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Sweden: Where it's taboo for dads to skip parental leave

It's been 50 years since Sweden introduced state-funded parental leave, designed for couples to share. The pioneering policy offers some surprising lessons for other countries. Kjell Sarnold has a glint in his eye as he describes fond memories of his parental leave in the 1970s.

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Ex-Afghan special forces to have UK relocation claims re-examined

Former Afghan special forces who served alongside the British but were denied relocation to the UK will have their cases re-examined, the government says. Armed Forces Minister James Heappey said ineligible applications with credible claims of links to Afghan specialist units would be reassessed.

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Scientists in awe at detail in telescope photos

Highly detailed images of 19 spiral galaxies have been released by Nasa. They were captured by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and are being analysed by scientists from the University of Oxford.

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TB Joshua exposé: YouTube deletes Emmanuel TV channel of disgraced megachurch leader

YouTube has terminated the official channel of disgraced Nigerian televangelist TB Joshua's megachurch for violating its hate speech policies. It comes weeks after an investigation by the BBC and openDemocracy uncovered evidence of widespread sexual abuse and torture by the late preacher.

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The gaming industry is aiming for subscribers. Will gamers play along?

Media ownership has increasingly diminished as music, television and film consumers have settled into streaming. As gaming subscriptions grow, a similar transition is inevitable.

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Microsleeps: The naps that may only last seconds

Far shorter than a nap, microsleeps can last only a few seconds. They may be a sign of deeper problems getting decent sleep. We're not talking about a five-minute doze on the sofa while you're bingeing on a box set. That counts as a long time in the world of microsleeping.

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Elon Musk: $56bn Tesla compensation package voided by court

A judge in the US state of Delaware has annulled a $56bn (£44bn) pay deal awarded to Elon Musk in 2018 by the electric car company Tesla.The lawsuit was filed by a shareholder who argued that it was an overpayment.

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Did The Future Already Happen? - The Paradox of Time

Go to https://brilliant.org/nutshell/ to dive deeper into these topics and more with a free 30-day trial + 20% off for the first 200 people! This video was sponsored by Brilliant. Thanks a lot for the support! Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources-what-is-time? Is your

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Wireless charging: The roads where electric vehicles never need to plug in

The first wireless electric road in the US has been installed in Detroit, allowing electric vehicles to charge up as they drive along. But at nearly $2m (£1.6m) per mile, is this really the future of transport? It looks like any other stretch of asphalt in cities across the US.

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'First of all you must be patient, then you need spatial memory': The man behind the puzzle that 99% can't solve

In 1975, the Hungarian academic Ernő Rubik applied for a patent on his invention. Little did he know that his ingenious teaching tool, created behind the Iron Curtain, would become an iconic global phenomenon.

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UK considers recognising Palestine state, Lord Cameron says

Britain is ready to bring forward the moment when it formally recognises a Palestinian state, the foreign secretary has suggested. Lord Cameron said Palestinians had to be given a political horizon to encourage peace in the Middle East.

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Elon Musk says Neuralink implanted wireless brain chip

Tech billionaire Elon Musk has claimed his Neuralink company has successfully implanted one of its wireless brain chips in a human. In a post on X, formerly Twitter, he said "promising" brain activity had been detected after the procedure and the patient was "recovering well".

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Haji Malang: The Sufi shrine caught up in a religious row in Mumbai

A Sufi shrine frequented by Indians of all faiths made headlines recently after a top political leader said that he wanted to "liberate" it for just Hindus. The BBC's Cherylann Mollan visited to understand what the controversy was about.

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X blocks searches for Taylor Swift after explicit AI images of her go viral

Social media platform X has blocked searches for Taylor Swift after explicit AI-generated images of the singer began circulating on the site. In a statement to the BBC, X's head of business operations Joe Benarroch said it was a "temporary action" to prioritise safety.

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Mona Lisa: Protesters throw soup at da Vinci painting

Protesters have thrown soup at the glass-protected Mona Lisa painting in Paris. The 16th Century paining by Leonardo da Vinci is one of the world's most famous artworks, and is held at the Louvre in Paris.

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Robert Corfield, ex-minister of secretive sect, admits to child sex abuse

Robert Corfield, a man who abused a boy in Canada in a secretive Christian church in the 1980s, has spoken publicly about what happened for the first time. He was confronted by the BBC as part of a wider look into claims of child sexual abuse spanning decades within the church, known as The Truth.

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Football comes first for Devon boy, 12, who scored IQ of 162

Rory Bidwell, from Great Torrington, Devon, joined the ranks of Mensa after acing the Cattell III B test with 162, the top score for children. This is above what is believed to be a score of 160 for Albert Einstein.

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Israel reined in by ICJ rulings on Gaza - but will it obey?

This was not a complete victory for South Africa, or the Palestinians. The ICJ did not order Israel to halt its military campaign - an implied recognition of Israel's right to self defence in the wake of the Hamas attacks on 7 October last year.

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Taylor Swift deepfakes spark calls in Congress for new legislation

US politicians have called for new laws to criminalise the creation of deepfake images, after explicit faked photos of Taylor Swift were viewed millions of times online. The images were posted on social media sites, including X and Telegram.

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Donald Trump must pay E Jean Carroll $83.3m for defamation

A New York jury has decided Donald Trump should pay $83.3m (£65m) for defaming columnist E Jean Carroll in 2019 while he was US president.The penalty in the civil trial is made up of $18.3m for compensatory damages and $65m in punitive damages.

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The Quest to Decode the Mandelbrot Set, Math’s Famed Fractal

For decades, a small group of mathematicians has patiently unraveled the mystery of what was once math’s most popular picture. Their story shows how technology transforms even the most abstract mathematical landscapes.

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TV channels are using AI-generated presenters to read the news. The question is, will we trust them?

A start-up is developing a news service presented by anchors created by artificial intelligence. Will it upend decades of parasocial relationships between television audiences and the people they watch on screen? The footage wouldn't look out of place on many of the world's news channels.

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Why private helicopters are still in demand

How many children draw helicopters and aeroplanes dreaming of being pilots or designing their own aircraft one day? Jason Hill was one such teenager, but he clung on to that vision through aeronautical engineering studies and work in the aviation industry.

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Ingenuity: Damage puts end to ground-breaking Mars helicopter mission

Nasa's Ingenuity Mars helicopter, which made history by achieving the first powered flight on another world, has suffered mission-ending damage. In a statement, Nasa said the aircraft was forced to perform an "emergency landing" that damaged its rotors.

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Hermit crabs are 'wearing' our plastic rubbish

Hermit crabs all over the world, which scavenge shells as armour for their bodies, are turning increasingly to plastic waste instead. The conclusion is based on analysis of photos, taken by wildlife enthusiasts, and published online.

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Solving Stephen Hawking’s famous paradox | Janna Levin

Quantum wormholes are mathematically possible — but might also be physically impossible. Physicist Janna Levin explains Hawking’s famous information paradox. ❍ Subscribe to The Well on YouTube: https://bit.ly/welcometothewell ❍ Up next: A 9-minute journey inside a black hole https://www.yo

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Bellaghy bog body: Human remains are 2,000 years old

Ancient human remains which date back more than 2,000 years have been recovered by the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI). The discovery was made after archaeologists were alerted to human bones on Bellaghy peatland in County Londonderry in October 2023.

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European mission approved to detect cosmic ripples

What will be one of the most ambitious and most expensive space missions ever mounted by Europe has just been given the formal green light. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (Lisa) will try to detect ripples in the fabric of space-time generated when gargantuan black holes collide.

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Thai police to charge two over pet lion spotted cruising in Bentley

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Stricken Japanese Moon mission landed on its nose

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Captain Cook statue vandalised in Melbourne on eve of Australia Day

A century-old Captain James Cook statue has been cut down and a Queen Victoria monument covered in red paint in an apparent protest in Australia.The late-night vandalism occurred in Melbourne on the eve of Australia Day and is under police investigation.

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US scientist recommends adding salt to make perfect cup of tea

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A wellness expert recommends her favourite spa experiences on the paradisiacal island of Bali

Bali-based Kathryn Romeyn knows the island's best spas inside-out and shares her picks, from romantic couple's treatments at Ayana Estate to sleep therapy at Capella Ubud.

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The dark history behind Madeira's famous levadas

Fundamental to Madeiran identity, its 3,100km of aqueducts have proven to be more than a clever and functional feat of engineering to colonise an isolated island. Trudging through thick mud under heavy rain, I made my way along a narrow path, squeezing through twisted laurel trees.

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World's first IVF rhino pregnancy 'could save species'

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Asbestos in drinking water: What does it mean for human health?

Hundreds of thousands of miles of pipes made from asbestos cement deliver drinking water to people around the world, but are reaching the end of their lifespan and starting to degrade. Scientists are now debating whether this could pose a risk to human health.

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Exploring the boundaries of reality with physics | Janna Levin

A physicist discusses the boundaries of reality and experimentation. ❍ Subscribe to The Well on YouTube: https://bit.ly/welcometothewell ❍ Up next: The problem with the theory of everything https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OTiU27ydnw Theoretical cosmologist Janna Levin discusses the dynamic i

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The problem with the theory of everything | Janna Levin

Gravity defies quantum mechanics. What does that mean for a theory of everything? ❍ Subscribe to The Well on YouTube: https://bit.ly/welcometothewell ❍ Up next: The invisible math that controls the world https://youtu.be/sVQKxX2c2GA There’s a pursuit of simplicity and unification in theoret

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A "metaphysically terrifying” look inside black holes | Janna Levin

One day we might fall into a black hole. Here’s what we can expect, according to physicist Janna Levin. This interview is an episode from @The-Well, our publication about ideas that inspire a life well-lived, created with the @JohnTempletonFoundation. Subscribe to The Well on YouTube ► https:/

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The Apple Macintosh was first released 40 years ago: These people are still using the ageing computers

On 24 January 1984, the Apple Macintosh 128K personal computer was unveiled to the world, but 40 years later it still has a loyal following of fans – and users. David Blatner still has practically every Macintosh computer he ever bought. But one in particular stands out – the first.

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How TikTok created a new accent – and why it might be the future of English

People on TikTok have developed a specific accent - would you recognise it if you heard it? Before I switch on the ringlight, even before I've loaded my battery into my camera, I already know what I'm going to say. I press record, look at the lens, and deliver my script.

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The discovery of the Americas' long-lost 'Rome'

The unearthing of an immense network of cities deep in the Ecuadorean Amazon is proving that the world's biggest rainforest was once a thriving cosmopolitan hub.

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Does Antimatter Create Anti-Gravity?

Learn More About 80,000 Hours at: https://www.80000hours.org/spacetime PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime From hoverboards

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Kim Jong Un: Is North Korea's leader actually considering war?

North Korea experts - by nature, a cautious group who seek to avoid sowing panic - have been left reeling by two of their own. Last week, the two eminent analysts dropped a bomb - so to speak - in stating their belief that the pariah state's leader is preparing for war.

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Kenneth Eugene Smith: Wait for untested execution like 'torture'

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The strange reasons medieval people slept in cupboards

These cosy, wardrobe-like pieces of furniture could reportedly sleep up to five people. Why did they fall out of fashion? At a museum in Wick, in the far north of Scotland, is what looks like a particularly large pine wardrobe.

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Narco-sub with $27m of 'scorpion' cocaine seized in Colombia

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From London to New York: Can quitting cars be popular?

Cities around the world reveal surprising truths about getting the public on board with cutting car-use. "There is a war against cars in America," a popular right-wing YouTube channel declared in 2017.

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Ayodhya Ram Mandir: India PM Modi inaugurates Hindu temple on razed Babri mosque site

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has inaugurated a grand temple to Hindu god Ram in the flashpoint city of Ayodhya. He said it heralded "a new era" for India - the temple replaces a 16th-Century mosque torn down by Hindu mobs in 1992, sparking riots in which nearly 2,000 people died.

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Jerusalem: Armenian Christians fight controversial land deal

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Why the world needs cults | Jamie Wheal for Big Think

Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ►► https://www.youtube.com/c/bigthink Check out Jamie Wheal's latest book "Recapture the Rapture: Rethinking God, Sex and Death in a World That's Lost Its Mind" ►► https://www.recapturetherapture.com/ Humans are highly conscious of social status. We are tri

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How your brain creates reality | Lisa Feldman Barrett

Your social reality isn’t an absolute reality. A leading neuroscientist explains why. ❍ Subscribe to The Well on YouTube: https://bit.ly/welcometothewell ❍ Up next: Why belief is the most powerful disruptor https://youtu.be/iJitID2HAhc Our perception of reality is not an exact representatio

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Japan lands on Moon but glitch threatens mission

A Japanese robot has successfully touched down on the Moon but problems with its solar power system mean the mission may live for just a few hours.The Smart Lander for Investigating Moon (Slim) put itself gently on the lunar surface near an equatorial crater.

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Davos 2024: Can – and should – leaders aim to regulate AI directly?

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Concrete tunnels and permafrost: How Sweden is future-proofing skiing

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Cash-in-transit heists bring terror to South Africa’s roads

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How safe are hot air balloons? What to know before taking to the clouds

When it comes to adventure-seeking, there is always risk involved. But hot air balloon rides are rarely fatal. Here’s how travellers can prepare for safety and enjoyment. According to a news release, the crash happened around 07:50. in Eloy, about 105km south of Phoenix.

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Can The Crisis in Cosmology Be SOLVED With Cosmic Voids?

Check out the Space Time Merch Store https://www.pbsspacetime.com/shop Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Two of the greatest mysteries in cosmology are the nature of dark energy and the apparent conflict in our measurements of the expa

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Japan mission is latest effort to land on the Moon

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Georgia Stalin: Icon removed from Tbilisi church

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Thailand: Man jailed for 50 years for defaming monarchy

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Pope Francis says sexual pleasure is 'a gift from God'

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North Korea: Rare footage shows teens sentenced to hard labour over K-drama

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Lakshadweep: Can India's 'alternative Maldives' handle mass tourism?

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Courtney Dauwalter: Step inside the 'pain cave', where rules are remade

Sign up for notifications to the latest Insight features via the BBC Sport app and find the most recent in the series. Chamonix is rocking.

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Peregrine lander: US Moon mission on course for fiery destruction

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Unseen images of code breaking computer that helped win WW2

GCHQ has released never before seen images of Colossus, the UK's secret code-breaking computer credited with helping the Allies win World War Two. The intelligence agency is publishing them to mark the 80th anniversary of the device's invention.

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US woman gets 26 years for mother's 'suitcase murder'

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A 75km hike through 'the Graveyard of the Pacific'

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Guinness World Records reviews 'world's oldest dog' title

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Exciting new cancer drug kinder than chemotherapy

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Emma Stone: Sex scenes in Poor Things are 'honest'

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Cloned rhesus monkey created to speed medical research

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Visualising the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

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The brain myth that won’t die | Lisa Feldman Barrett

This interview is an episode from @The-Well, our publication about ideas that inspire a life well-lived, created with the @JohnTempletonFoundation. Subscribe to The Well on YouTube ► https://bit.ly/thewell-youtube Watch Lisa Feldman Barrett’s next interview ► https://youtu.be/GIqAGEhUkCI Pla

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Kenya cult leader Paul Mackenzie faces terror charges over mass deaths

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A23a: Spectacular arches, caves as monster iceberg decays

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The Speed Project Atacama: The rebel race across a desert

Sign up for notifications to the latest Insight features via the BBC Sport app and find the most recent in the series. The Atacama Desert, Chile.

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Iceland volcano eruption spills lava into town setting houses on fire

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Your pictures on the theme of 'in the cold'

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Is there life after death? | Sam Harris, Bill Nye, Michio Kaku, & more | Big Think

Is there life after death? Watch the newest video from Big Think: https://bigth.ink/NewVideo Learn skills from the world's top minds at Big Think Edge: https://bigth.ink/Edge Chapters: 0:00 Introduction 0:13 Michelle Thaller 1:10 Sam Harris 3:26 Michael Shermer 5:50 Rob Bell 8:08 Bill Nye 12:43 Mi

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BBC's Glenn Campbell: My brain cancer diagnosis was a total shock

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'We need jungle' - Amol Rajan on how a University Challenge question spawned a remix craze

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Strikes on Houthi targets in Yemen could undermine US aim to contain war

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Julia Roberts says she has made the choice not to do nude scenes

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Houthi strikes: Everything we know about the US-UK attack on targets in Yemen

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Annapoorani: Netflix removes Nayanthara film after backlash from Hindu groups

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Huge ring of galaxies challenges thinking on cosmos

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eBay pays $3m fine in blogger harassment case

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Huge ancient lost city found in the Amazon

The discovery changes what we know about the history of people living in the Amazon. The houses and plazas in the Upano area in eastern Ecuador were connected by an astounding network of roads and canals.

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FKA twigs calls Calvin Klein ad ban 'double standards'

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Like This One

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Mysterious plants and fungi named new to science

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Animators say ‘AI isn't going to get you an Oscar’

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Hard choices for the West in Red Sea stand-off

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Bitcoin: Crypto fans can now invest in exchange-traded funds - but what are they?

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Will reusable cups become as common as grocery totes?

As Starbucks begins to encourage multi-use cups for on-the-go orders, paper cups may soon go the way of plastic bags and single-use water bottles.

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Illegal New York synagogue tunnel leads to 9 arrests

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The new drugs that may bring an end to constant itching

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Microplastics are everywhere: Is it possible to reduce our exposure?

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All India Pregnant Job service: The Indian men who fell for the scam

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Artemis: Nasa delays crewed return to the Moon's surface

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Ecuador declares war on armed gangs after TV station attacked on air

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Italian fascist salute images spark political uproar

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New material found by AI could reduce lithium use in batteries

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The human touch AI virtual assistants can't replace

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2023 confirmed as world's hottest year on record

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Star Trek: The Deep Space Nine episode that predicted a US crisis

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South Korea passes law banning dog meat trade

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Deep-sea mining: Norway approves controversial practice

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Peregrine lander: Private US Moon mission runs into trouble

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The Travels of Marco Polo: The true story of a 14th-Century bestseller

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Supernova

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'I can't stay silent' on knife crime, Idris Elba says

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TB Joshua: Megachurch leader raped and tortured worshippers, BBC finds

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TB Joshua: ‘We thought it was heaven but then terrible things happened’

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Mouse filmed tidying up man's shed every night

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The last of the Moon men: the stories of the surviving Apollo astronauts

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The many lives of Trump Tower

Trump Tower has stood as a symbol of Donald Trump’s success and fame for 40 years, clad in enough pink marble and brass to make Liberace (a former resident) blush. The skyscraper rises over Manhattan’s Central Park in one of the most expensive shopping districts in the world, Fifth Avenue.

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Earning the trust of a 40-stone silverback gorilla

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What's the best time of the day to exercise?

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Ukraine war: Atesh, the group spying on Russians in occupied Crimea

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Palace of Aigai: Greece reopens huge Alexander the Great monument

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Neptune and Uranus seen in true colours for first time

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Oscar Pistorius to be released on parole in South Africa

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Philippe Bekaert

Philippe Bekaert (1967 - 2022) was a professor in visual computing at the Expertise center for Digital Media EDM of Hasselt University, Belgium.

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San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge gets suicide net after 87 years

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Are Jains the original vegans?

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Can artificial intelligence help you get fit?

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Tetris: US teenager becomes first to beat video game

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Harvard's Claudine Gay a casualty of campus culture wars

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The qualities that are more attractive than our looks

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Mickey Mouse horror film unveiled as copyright ends

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Japan Airlines plane in flames on the runway at Tokyo's Haneda Airport

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Brian Cox - Solving The Fermi Paradox: Intelligent Alien Life in Our Galaxy

Brian Cox - Solving The Fermi Paradox: Intelligent Alien Life in Our Galaxy Subscribe to Science Time: https://www.youtube.com/sciencetime24 Brian Cox explains the details behind the Fermi Paradox and why we haven't yet found intelligent alien life. The more interesting kind of life we hope to dis

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Brian Cox - Is The Whole Universe Inside a Black Hole?

Brian Cox - Is The Whole Universe Inside a Black Hole? Subscribe to Science Time: https://www.youtube.com/sciencetime24 Professor Brian Cox explains the science behind black holes and the beginning of the universe. Virtually all cosmologists and theoretical physicists endorse the idea that our uni

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Amazing images from James Webb telescope, two years after launch

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) was launched to orbit just two years ago, but already it's starting to redefine our view of the early Universe. CASSIOPEIA A The expanding shells of debris from Cas A, an exploded star, or supernova. The main ring is about 15 light-years across.

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Why Do Exact Equations Become Unpredictable?

Check out https://guard.io/actionlab for a 7-day trial and 20% off your subscription + the ability to protect 5 family members from hackers and scammers! The space simulations were done in Universe Sandbox: http://universesandbox.com/ Create your own choreographies here: http://gminton.org/#choreo

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US warship in Red Sea shoots down two Houthi missiles from Yemen

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Mali: UN peacekeeping mission ends after decade

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Sahara migrant smuggling: Double-edged sword of overturning Niger's ban

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Male pill: The scientist working on 'progress for humanity'

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Austrian government launches repair scheme for electronic goods

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Nasa mission lines up to 'touch the Sun'

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Iceland

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Plane stowaway in serious condition in France

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Champagne stoppers in space: How cork will protect the next spacecraft to visit the Moon

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British mother and son killed in French avalanche

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What If There's A Black Hole Inside The Sun? | Hawking Stars

Check out the NEW Space Time Merch Store: https://www.pbsspacetime.com/shop Use Code: PBS at Checkout for 15% off in December PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord!

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Google settles $5bn lawsuit for 'private mode' tracking

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Trump denies bullying his way into Home Alone 2

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Explosions and exploration: Why 2023 was an exciting year in space

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New York Times sues Microsoft and OpenAI for ‘billions’

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How humans have changed the Earth's surface in 2023

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Thousands join huge migrant caravan in Mexico ahead of Blinken visit

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The WW1 Christmas Truce: 'The war, for that moment, came to a standstill'

During the bleak winter of 1914, amid the mud, blood and chaos of World War One, an extraordinary series of ceasefires spontaneously occurred along the Western Front. In the 1960s the BBC spoke to some of the men who, over that exceptional Christmas period, decided to lay down their arms.

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Sri Lanka: Thousands arrested in week-long anti-drug operation

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Slovakia arrest over threat to copy Prague attack

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The mystery of the medieval fighting snails

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Pornhub owner to pay victims $1.8m in sex trafficking case

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How killer left a trail of victims across Prague

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China to increase curbs on video gaming industry

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Lapsus$: GTA 6 hacker handed indefinite hospital order

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Shooting at Prague university leaves dead and injured

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Glynn Simmons: US judge exonerates inmate after 48 years in prison

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Love Songs

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South Korea: Students sue after teacher ends exam 90 seconds early

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Colorado Supreme Court kicks Trump off ballot, citing 'insurrection'

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Paraguay jail: Fighting cockerels seized in deadly raid

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Nasa beams cat video from deep space with laser

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Egyptian Fractions and the Greedy Algorithm - Numberphile

Featuring Sophie Maclean. See https://brilliant.org/numberphile for Brilliant and 20% off their premium service & 30-day trial (episode sponsor). More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ Sophie Maclean is based at Kings College, London: https://sophiethemathmo.wordpress.com Sophie on

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Every 'Useless' Body Part Explained From Head to Toe | WIRED

Dr. Jeffrey Laitman joins WIRED to break down every ‘useless’, vestigial organ and structure in our evolved human bodies. From the “wisdom” teeth and our simian tailbones down to muscles made less important by our double-arched feet, Dr. Laitman highlights where it came from—and how it end

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Timbuktu: Mali's ancient city defies jihadist siege to stage a festival

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The Somerset family travelling to Australia without flying

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Pope says Roman Catholic priests can bless same-sex couples

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Elon Musk: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

John Oliver discusses Elon Musk, the influence he has over more than just his businesses, and the perfect place for him and Mark Zuckerberg to finally have that cage match. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almo

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Armed robbers' car stolen during Colorado heist, police say

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In History: The first ever video game console, 50 years on

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EU takes action against Elon Musk's X over disinformation

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Twitch U-turns on 'artistic nudity' policy

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Red Sea cargo ship hijack: How to keep merchant vessels safe from attack

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Hostage shooting incident 'against rules of engagement', IDF says

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How Britain's taste for tea may have been a life saver

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What if Humans Are NOT Earth's First Civilization? | Silurian Hypothesis

Enjoy 10% OFF and free worldwide shipping on all Hoverpens with code PBS: North America & other countries: https://bit.ly/pbs_novium UK & Europe: https://bit.ly/pbs_noviumeu To support your local station, go to: http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Disco

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GCHQ Christmas challenge: Agency reveals 2023 codebreaker

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A23a: Monster iceberg just shy of a trillion tonnes

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DateTime

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COP28: Landmark summit takes direct aim at fossil fuels

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Perseverance: Nasa's Mars rover celebrates 1,000 days of science

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Russia's new Black Sea naval base alarms Georgia

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Our Lady of Guadalupe: Pilgrims converge on basilica in Mexico

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Nude painting row at French school sparks teacher walkout

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Could there be a gold rush for buried hydrogen?

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Controversial clothes hook spy cameras for sale on Amazon

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The real-life Willy Wonkas trying to change chocolate

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Gavdos: The European island known for nudity

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Alex Jones: Conspiracy theorist set to return to X after Elon Musk poll

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What would a magnitude 15 earthquake be like?

Get a copy of What If? 2 and Randall’s other books at: https://xkcd.com/books More serious answers to absurd questions at: https://what-if.xkcd.com/ Since we usually hear about earthquakes with ratings somewhere between 3 and 9, a lot of people probably think of 10 as the top of the scale and 0 a

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How To Destroy The Universe

Check out some of our favorite shop products here: https://kgs.link/shop. Our shop is not only our most important source of income, but our passion project where we create sciencey products with of lot of love and detail. Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources-three-ways-t

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AI: EU agrees landmark deal on regulation of artificial intelligence

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Tyrannosaur’s last meal was two baby dinosaurs

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How ancient civilisations dealt with trauma

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Chinese garlic is a national security risk, says US senator

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Google admits AI viral video was edited to look better

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The teenager who lives like it's the 1940s

Callum Grubb is only 19 but he lives his life as if it is the 1940s. Nearly everything he owns is from the time period, including his clothes.

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UPenn loses $100m donation after House testimony

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Denmark passes law to ban Quran burnings

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Russia hacking: 'FSB in years-long cyber attacks on UK', says government

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Blood test shows if organs are ageing fast or slowly

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ChatGPT tool could be abused by scammers and hackers

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Google claims new Gemini AI 'thinks more carefully'

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Israeli settler violence brings destruction and fear to West Bank as war rages

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Inside the secret complex making high-tech gadgets for UK spies

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Olive oil price skyrockets as Spanish drought bites

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Remembered: Simon the rat-catching hero navy cat

To this day, Simon is the only cat in history to have received the esteemed Dickin Medal. The animal equivalent of the Victoria Cross, the honour was founded 80 years ago, with formidable feline Simon posthumously awarded it six years later.

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Israel probes claims share traders knew of Hamas attack in advance

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The houses built to survive floods

The Manobo indigenous people live and thrive on a vast wetland in the Philippines – despite dealing with dozens of storms and floods per year. What can we learn from them?

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23andMe: Profiles of 6.9 million people hacked

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What Happens After the Universe Ends?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to: http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE ↓ More info below ↓ Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Check out the Space Time Merch Store https://pbsspacetime.com/

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Spread of gang violence wrecks Sweden's peaceful image

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Young-looking porn users may face extra age-checks

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Human intelligence: it's how your brain is wired rather than size that matters

Our brains don't look that special when looking at their relative size compared to our closest animal relatives. To understand human intelligence, scientists are now looking deeper.

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Space Typography

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Attenborough ship encounters mammoth iceberg

The UK's polar ship, RRS Sir David Attenborough, has come face to face with the world's biggest iceberg. The planned encounter allowed scientists on board the research vessel a closer look at one of the true wonders of the natural world.

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Mount Marapi: Eleven hikers killed as volcano erupts in Indonesia

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Milford Haven: Garden ornament turns out to be live bomb

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Henry Kissinger's Cambodia legacy of bombs and chaos

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Bond villains in the frame

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Could X go bankrupt under Elon Musk?

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Central Paris attack leaves one dead and one injured

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Bologna's leaning tower sealed off over fears it could collapse

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Quinto Inuma: Peru environmentalist who fought for Amazon shot dead

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Paris Olympics 2024: Locals ask if they're worth the trouble

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Typical Seating Chart

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The final frontier? How humans could live underwater in 'ocean stations'

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AI-powered digital colleagues are here. Some 'safe' jobs could be vulnerable.

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Russia: LGBT groups could be declared 'extremist' in court ruling

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The Internet is Worse Than Ever – Now What?

Go to https://ground.news/nutshell to get 30% off unlimited access to Ground News - a website and app that gathers the world’s news in one place so you can compare coverage and find common ground. Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources-why-we-hate-each-other/ In 2022 n

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PrEP: Preventative HIV drug highly effective, study says

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What if we aimed the Hubble Telescope at Earth?

Get a copy of What If? 2 and Randall’s other books at: https://xkcd.com/books More serious answers to absurd questions at: https://what-if.xkcd.com/ If you pointed the Hubble telescope at the Earth, what could you see? Could you read over your neighbor’s shoulder? Or would it all just be a big

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X Value

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'Perfect solar system' found in search for alien life

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What we can learn from the ancient art of wayfinding

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Stephen Fry reads Nick Cave's stirring letter about ChatGPT and human creativity

In August of this year, as part of his Red Hand Files correspondence project, legendary musician Nick Cave was asked questions about creativity and ChatGPT by two fans, Leon and Charlie. Nick replied with a single letter, which Stephen Fry joined us to read at the 10th anniversary Letters Live sho

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A shark nursery may be a stone's throw from Miami's bright lights

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How Hamas built a force to attack Israel on 7 October

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Samuel Paty: Six French teenagers on trial over teacher's murder

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Harvard under fire for helping elite skip the queue

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Tyrian purple: The lost ancient pigment that was more valuable than gold

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The last places on Earth to see truly dark starry nights

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The Self-Levitating Kingsbury Aerodynamic Bearing

The first 100 people to go to https://blinkist.com/stevemould will get unlimited access for 1 week to try it out. You'll also get 25% off if you want full membership. Hydrodynamic bearings are really cool! The Kingsbury aerodynamic bearing is a brilliant example as is an ordinary glass syringe. A

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Korean true crime fan murdered stranger 'out of curiosity'

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A23a: World's biggest iceberg on the move after 30 years

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Could airports make hydrogen work as a fuel?

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Napoleon and Josephine: Was their great love affair a myth?

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Pakistan charging refugees $830 to leave

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China says no 'unusual or novel pathogens' after WHO queries respiratory outbreaks

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Bhagwa Love Trap: A new Indian online trend causing real-world harm

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The Chinese mafia's downfall in a lawless casino town

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The historic volcanic eruptions encoded in art

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The genes that made us truly human may also make us ill

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The New Orleans landmark that almost became Napoleon's retirement home

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French pilot sentenced for decapitating skydiver with wing of plane

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Sam Altman: Ousted OpenAI boss to return days after being sacked

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Climate change: Rise in Google searches around ‘anxiety’

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The Black Mambas: South Africa's all-female anti-poaching unit

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Banksy: BBC reveals lost interview of street artist after 20 years

The recording includes Banksy comparing his approach to art - which involves producing graffiti undercover at speed - to microwaving meals. The full interview can be heard on BBC Radio 4's The Banksy Story, which is available on BBC Sounds.

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Rocket Launch In a Giant Vacuum Chamber

🚀 Install Star Trek Fleet Command for FREE now https://t2m.io/TheActionLabSTFC and enter the promo code WARPSPEED to unlock 10 Epic Shards of Kirk, enhancing your command instantly! How to easily redeem the promo code 👉 https://t2m.io/promo_STFC Shop the Action Lab Science Gear here: https://

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Italy mafia trial: 200 sentenced to 2,200 years for mob links

More than 200 defendants in one of Italy's biggest mafia trials for generations have been sentenced to a total of more than 2,200 years in jail. The three-year trial saw individuals allegedly linked to the 'Ndrangheta sentenced for crimes ranging from extortion to drug trafficking.

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Red-wine headache explained - and it is not about volume

US researchers say they may have discovered why some people get a headache after just one small glass of red wine, even though they are fine drinking other types of alcohol.

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‘I was addicted to social media - now I'm suing Big Tech’

Hundreds of families are suing some of the world's biggest technology companies - who, they say, knowingly expose children to harmful products. One plaintiff explains why they are taking on the might of Silicon Valley.

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Macallan: Rare Scotch whisky becomes world's most expensive bottle at £2.1m

Image source, Tristan FewingsBBC NewsA rare bottle of whisky has been sold for $2.7m (£2.1m) - breaking the record for the most expensive wine or spirit sold at auction.The Macallan 1926 single malt is one of the world's most sought-after bottles of Scotch whisky.

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Ukraine war: The Russians snitching on colleagues and strangers

Snitching, or reporting neighbours, colleagues and even strangers to the authorities, was common in Russia's Soviet era. Now, as the government cracks down on critics of the Ukraine war, people with personal grudges and political ideals are denouncing others once again.

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Don Walsh: The man who made the deepest ever dive

Ocean explorer Captain Don Walsh has died at the age of 92. More than 60 years ago he made the first ever descent to the deepest place in the ocean, the Mariana Trench which lies almost 11km (seven miles) down. I was lucky enough to count him as a good friend.

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Napoleon Bonaparte's hat to go on sale at Paris auction

BBC NewsA hat belonging to Napoleon Bonaparte when he ruled the French empire in the 19th Century will go on sale at auction in Paris on Sunday.The bicorne black beaver felt hat is valued between €600,000 and €800,000 (£525,850-£701,131).

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Boiling Water On Mount Everest! | Earth Lab

Water boils at lower temperatures at high altitudes, so when does water boil on Mount Everest? The team designs an experiment to find out. Subscribe to Earth Lab for more fascinating science videos - http://bit.ly/SubscribeToEarthLab All the best Earth Lab videos http://bit.ly/EarthLabOriginals Be

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How ice water makes hot water boil

The first 500 people to use this link will get 2 free months of Skillshare Premium Membership: https://skl.sh/stevemould6 Charles Marzzacco's channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/charliemarz How to film inside a microwave: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bXhsUs-ohw Videos of weird things happeni

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Sam Altman: The extraordinary firing of an AI superstar

The tech world is in shock.

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China navy used sonar pulses against divers, Australia says

Australia has accused China's navy of using sonar pulses in an incident in international waters that resulted in Australian divers suffering injuries.

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Elon Musk's Starship rocket to make second flight

American entrepreneur Elon Musk will have another go shortly at launching his mammoth new rocket, Starship. The vehicle's maiden flight in April ended in spectacular style when it lost control and exploded four minutes after leaving the ground in Texas.

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Climate change: Is the world warming faster than expected?

Climate records have tumbled in 2023. There have been historically high sea temperatures, worrying lows in Antarctic sea-ice, and extreme weather events hitting every continent - the latest being an "unbearable" heatwave in Brazil.

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AI boss Sam Altman ousted by OpenAI board

Sam Altman, the head of artificial intelligence firm OpenAI, has been ousted by the company's board, which said it had lost confidence in his ability to lead the company.

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White House criticises Elon Musk over 'hideous' antisemitic lie

The White House has accused Elon Musk of repeating a "hideous lie" about Jewish people, after the X owner appeared to respond approvingly to an antisemitic post on the platform. On Wednesday, Mr Musk replied a post sharing an antisemitic conspiracy theory, calling it "actual truth".

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Apple to bridge message divide - but keeps green bubbles

Hopes have risen that the era of green and blue message bubbles on iPhones might eventually come to an end. Currently only iMessages from iPhones have blue bubbles.

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Filming at 1000fps in Reverse - The Slow Mo Guys

Gav tries to film a cheeky slow mo guys video, but someone has already done it... sort of. Own Tenet now in 4K UltraHD Blu-Ray & Digital: https://www.tenetfilm.com/?buynow Thanks to Warner Bros. for sponsoring this video. Follow on Twitter - https://twitter.com/TheSlowMoGuys Follow on Instagram - ht

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A love letter to watchmaking: How clocks have shaped our world

It goes without saying that a watchmaker would be fascinated by watches. I started my training in the art of traditional artisanal watchmaking 20 years ago – using centuries-old techniques to create little machines that can tell us the time of day.

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The hidden beauty of Berlin's indoor pools

On a recent November day in Berlin's upscale Prenzlauer Berg neighbourhood, locals in long jackets pushed strollers through the crisp autumn air. Others wrapped themselves in blankets and lingered at outdoor cafes.

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Bowen: Ceasefire demands will grow without proof of Hamas HQ at Al-Shifa

It is now days since Israeli forces entered Al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza City, and what appears to be happening on Friday is that they are continuing their search for evidence of this being a key Hamas command centre.

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Follow up: Is Google Always Listening: Live Test

My video, Is Google Always Listening Live Test has past 1 million views and so I decided to do a quick follow up video describing all the reasons why people should remain skeptical regarding whether Google, Facebook, Cortana or anybody is listening and recording audio from your microphone in order t

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Is Google always listening: Live Test

Follow up video: https://youtu.be/kv8gvXPwWjY Does Google and Facebook listen in and record conversations and audio even when they're not open? I perform a live test using Google chrome on a Windows 10 PC to discover whether my microphone appears to be recording me even when my browser is turned of

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Russian Carlsberg staff arrested after business seized

The boss of Carlsberg's Russian business and a top manager have been arrested after the Kremlin took control of the beer company in the country. Denis Sherstennikov and Anton Rogachevsky, bosses at Carlsberg's Russian subsidiary Baltika Breweries, were detained on Wednesday.

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Discover the eight best photo-ops in New York City

From its famous skyline to its bustling streets, New York City is a visual medley that has captivated photographers for decades. Continually ranked as the most photographed city on the planet, you could spend a lifetime documenting the cultural capital of the US' endlessly inspiring sights.

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Staking bij AB InBev in Leuven, Hoegaarden en Luik: "Ze willen miljoenen voor directie niet delen met personeel" 

Er is een staking aan de gang bij bierbrouwer AB InBev in Leuven, Luik en Hoegaarden. Volgens de vakbond ligt de productie in de drie fabrieken volledig stil. Aanleiding zijn afgesprongen onderhandelingen over loon- en arbeidsvoorwaarden. 

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PepsiCo sued by New York state for plastic pollution

PepsiCo has been sued by New York state for plastic pollution along Buffalo River that is allegedly contaminating the water and harming wildlife. According to the lawsuit, PepsiCo is the single largest identifiable contributor to the problem.

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Mekong: The last chance to save a mighty river

Mai takes a deep breath before disappearing below the muddy brown waters of the biggest freshwater lake in South East Asia. A few bubbles rise to the surface - the only sign that he is underwater, freeing his fishing net, which he had left hanging between trees in a flooded forest.

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Top general locked away evidence of SAS executions

One of the UK's most senior generals was warned in writing in 2011 that SAS soldiers were claiming to have executed handcuffed detainees in Afghanistan.

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How to Win an Interstellar War

Check out some of our favorite shop products here: https://kgs.link/shop Our shop is not only our most important source of income, but our passion project where we create sciencey products with of lot of love and detail. Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources-interstellarw

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Ukraine war: Russian diamonds set for ban under new EU sanctions

Diamonds may be forever, but not when it comes to imports from Russia into the European Union. Russia is the biggest producer of rough diamonds cut from hundreds of mines beneath the Siberian permafrost, where a third of the world's diamond supply comes from.

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Magicians less prone to mental illness - study

Whether it is comedians such as Robin Williams or famous painters such as Van Gogh, many creative people have long been known to suffer with their mental-health. But new research shows that the same is not so of magicians.

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Orce, Spain: The site of Europe's earliest settlers

Nestled in the heart of the High Plateau of Grenada in southern Spain, the 1,300-person town of Orce is surrounded by a tapestry of dry badlands, deep canyons and crystal-clear reservoirs that extend as far as the eye can see.

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The online black market cashing in on weight loss jab hype

Maddy, 32, fell seriously ill after using an unlicensed version of semaglutide - the active ingredient in Ozempic - from Instagram. It also found the drug being offered in beauty salons in Manchester and Liverpool.

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Bird of Century: Pūteketeke wins NZ poll after campaign by John Oliver

The pūteketeke has been crowned New Zealand's Bird of the Century after US talk show host John Oliver's controversial intervention in the poll. Mr Oliver sparked a global frenzy with an "alarmingly aggressive" campaign for the vulnerable crested grebe.

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Time travel: What if you met your future self?

There's a classic short story by Ted Chiang in which a young merchant travels years ahead and meets his future self. Over the course of the story, the man receives warnings, promises and tips from the older, wiser version of himself.

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AI could predict hurricane landfall sooner - report

Artificial Intelligence could save lives by warning where a hurricane will hit land much sooner than traditional forecasting systems, researchers say. Weather forecasts have become much more accurate over the decades.

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Director Terry Gilliam: “We’re living in a time where irony is not recognized anymore”

"When we can’t distinguish between hate and humour, we are fucked! And that’s my feeling about life." Warning: This article contains strong language. (Right from the start) READ MORE : https://www.euronews.com/2023/10/19/director-terry-gilliam-were-living-in-a-time-where-irony-is-not-recognize

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Russian memorials to victims of Stalin vanish

Memorials to victims of Stalinist repression in Russia are disappearing or being vandalised amid increasing attempts to rehabilitate the Soviet dictator.

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Is time travel really possible? Here’s what physics says

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xkcd: Date Line

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11 mind-boggling facts about time

To mark the 60th anniversary of Doctor Who, we'll be spending the next week tackling the big questions about time, including the science of time travel, how clocks have shaped humanity, and even the mind-bending temporal consequences of flying into a black hole.

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International mafia bust shows US-Italy crime links still strong

Their names could have been ripped from the kind of Hollywood mafia script that once dominated US cinema.

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Fagradalsfjall: Iceland declares emergency over volcano eruption concerns

Iceland has declared a state of emergency after a series of earthquakes raised fears of a volcanic eruption. Authorities have ordered thousands living in the southwestern town of Grindavík to evacuate as a precaution.

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Belgium detains two far-right terror suspects

Anti-terrorism police in Belgium have detained two suspected members of a far-right group accused of plotting bomb attacks and inciting violence. The pair, a man and a woman in their early 20s, were picked up after a series of raids on houses in Diepenbeek and Ostend, prosecutors said.

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First ever images prove 'lost echidna' not extinct

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsScientists have filmed an ancient egg-laying mammal named after Sir David Attenborough for the first time, proving it isn't extinct as was feared.

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US veteran gets world's first eye transplant

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsSurgeons in New York say they have performed the world's first complete eye transplant on a man, although it is not certain he will regain vision.

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New Zealand: John Oliver's Bird of the Century backing ruffles feathers

An annual vote to elect New Zealand's favourite bird has exploded into an international public relations battle that is ruffling some feathers. Bird of the Year seeks to raise awareness of the country's many native species that are considered in danger.

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Batteries of the future: How cotton and seawater might power our devices

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Man crushed to death by robot in South Korea

BBC NewsA man has been crushed to death by a robot in South Korea after it failed to differentiate him from the boxes of food it was handling, reports say.The incident occurred when the man, a robotics company employee in his 40s, was inspecting the robot.

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Australian farmer Colin Deveraux survives crocodile attack by biting back

An Australian farmer says he is lucky to be alive after repelling a crocodile attack by biting back at the animal. Cattle producer Colin Deveraux has spent a month in hospital after being bitten by the 3.2m (10ft) saltwater crocodile in the Northern Territory.

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'I’m calling from Israeli intelligence. We have the order to bomb. You have two hours'

The call to Mahmoud Shaheen came at dawn. It was Thursday 19 October at about 06:30, and Israel had been bombing Gaza for 12 days straight.

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The 420-year-search for Shakespeare's lost play

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Chicago Marathon: Stoma runner's hopes after New York snub

Image source, Gayle RedmanBBC NewsA runner with a stoma who had to pull out of the New York City Marathon is hoping to compete in another race in the United States.Gayle Redman, a GP from Flint, was told by New York Road Runners that her supplies vest did not adhere to rules set by police.

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AI safety: How close is global regulation of artificial intelligence really?

As more than 100 attendees from civil society, the world's leading tech companies, and governments gathered in an English stately home, there was some tension.

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Euclid telescope: First images revealed from 'dark Universe' mission

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Passive income: Can easy side hustles earn big money?

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Plastic or paper? The truth about drinking straws

The backlash against single-use plastics has seen a growing market for paper, metal, glass and plant-based straws. But is the choice between them really a simple one?

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The US is quietly arming Taiwan to the teeth

When US President Joe Biden recently signed off on a $80m (£64.6m) grant to Taiwan for the purchase of American military equipment, China said it "deplores and opposes" what Washington had done. To the casual observer it didn't appear a steep sum.

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Musk says his new AI chatbot has 'a little humour'

Elon Musk has launched an AI chatbot called Grok on his social media site X, formerly Twitter, but so far it is only available to selected users. Mr Musk boasted that Grok "loves sarcasm" and would answer questions with "a little humour".

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James Webb telescope: Baby star launches giant jets and shocks

Image source, NASA/ESA/CSA/M. McCAUGHREAN & S. PEARSONScience correspondentImagine you could go back in time 4.6 billion years and take a picture of our Sun just as it was being born.

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Bowen: Five new realities after four weeks of Israel-Gaza war

One of the first things to understand about the reportage, analysis and commentary that has poured out since the Hamas attacks of 7 October is that no-one has the full story. Not only is it, as ever, hard to penetrate the fog of war to work out what is happening on the battlefield.

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US ornithological society says dozens of birds will be renamed

Several bird species in the US and Canada will receive new names based on their habitats and traits rather than people's names, the American Ornithological Society has announced.

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Criminals and sanctions-busters exploiting UK secrecy loophole

An offshore firm helped create companies used by members of Vladimir Putin's inner circle, including one hiding the late mercenary boss Yevgeny Prigozhin's yacht, the BBC can reveal.

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Indonesia cough syrup maker boss jailed after child deaths

The boss and three other officials of an Indonesian firm whose cough syrup was linked to the deaths of over 200 children have been sentenced to jail. They were handed two-year prison sentences and fined 1bn Indonesian rupiah ($63,029; £51,7130).

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Brain power dropped among over-50s during Covid-19 pandemic, study shows

The Covid pandemic may have impacted brain health in people in the UK aged 50 and over, according to a new study. More than 3,000 volunteers completed yearly questionnaires and online cognitive tests to measure changes in memory, and other faculties, as the pandemic unfolded.

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Arrest made in suspected Australian mushroom poisoning deaths

An Australian woman has been arrested over the suspected mushroom poisoning deaths of three people. The trio had fallen ill after attending a family lunch in the Victorian town of Leongatha in July. A fourth person was taken to hospital in a critical condition.

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Germany asks forgiveness for Tanzania colonial crimes

The German president has expressed "shame" for the colonial atrocities his country inflicted on Tanzania. German forces killed almost 300,000 people during the Maji Maji rebellion in the early 1900s, one of the bloodiest anti-colonial uprisings.

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Under the Stars

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AI: Scientists excited by tool that grades severity of rare cancer

Artificial intelligence is nearly twice as good at grading the aggressiveness of a rare form of cancer from scans as the current method, a study suggests. By recognising details invisible to the naked eye, AI was 82% accurate, compared with 44% for lab analysis.

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Demis Hassabis: AI must not 'move fast and break things'

Demis Hassabis, the co-founder of Google Deepmind, one of the UK's biggest AI firms, says the booming industry should not follow the same path adopted by the older tech giants. It was intended to encourage rapid innovation and company growth.

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Boris Johnson thought old people should accept Covid fate, inquiry told

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC PoliticsBoris Johnson agreed with some Conservative MPs who thought Covid was "nature's way of dealing with old people", the Covid inquiry was told.

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'Christmas creep': Why holiday candy hits shelves so early

For retailers of all types, the winter holidays are the most wonderful time of year. In 2023 alone, the National Retail Federation (NRF) expects shoppers will spend around $900 (£743) each on purchases for Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Christmas and other end-of-year festivities.

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White Island: Company found guilty over NZ volcano disaster

The company that licenses tours to New Zealand's White Island have been found guilty of safety lapses that led 22 people to die in a 2019 volcanic eruption. Whakaari Management, the final defendant in the case, will be sentenced in February.

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The Halloween peppermints that poisoned Bradford

A handful of sweets is as synonymous with Halloween as a spooky costume or a ghoulish pumpkin. But on 31 October 1858, this normally harmless treat killed several children, causing panic across Bradford and a rapidly rising death toll.

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Breaker Box

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The world's best tourism villages in 2023

For travellers looking for inspiration for their next city break, dozens of best-of lists abound.

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Dr Matthew Lani: TikTok star arrested in South Africa

Image source, Matthew Lani/TikTokBBC NewsA TikTok star accused of falsely claiming to be a doctor has been arrested after trying to enter a hospital in South Africa.Matthew Lani garnered thousands of followers by sharing medical advice and selling medication online.

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US announces 'strongest global action yet' on AI safety

Technology teamThe White House has announced what it is calling "the most significant actions ever taken by any government to advance the field of AI safety."An executive order from President Biden requires Artificial Intelligence (AI) developers to share safety results with the US government.

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How the right to repair might change technology

Surera Ward has been running Girls Fix It, a tech repair service near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for around four years. In that time, she and her team have got better at understanding the electronic devices that come into their workshop. But fixing them hasn't.

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Would you drink genetically modified beer?

Charles Denby says his job is simply all about trying to improve the taste of beer. For the millions and millions of lager and ale fans out there, these sentiments all sound great. But when you know what Mr Denby's US company actually does, things become a bit more divisive.

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The Tanzanians searching for their grandfathers' skulls in Germany

Isaria Anael Meli has been looking for his grandfather's remains for more than six decades. He believes the skull ended up in a Berlin museum after his grandfather, Mangi Meli, along with 18 other chiefs and advisers, were hanged by a German colonial force 123 years ago.

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Fingernails: Film asks, what if a machine could find your life partner?

Love. That intangible, addictive, complicated emotion that is the essence of being human. Now just imagine if it was more straightforward. No more guesswork, no more doubt. What if? That tantalising prospect is the premise of Fingernails, the second solo film from Greek director Christos Nikou.

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Alien language: If we met extraterrestrials, could we talk to them?

"We know where to look. We know how to look." That's what then Nasa's chief scientist Ellen Stofan said in 2015 when she predicted we might find alien life within the following 10 years.

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Spanish Church sexual abuse affected 200,000 children, commission finds

More than 200,000 children are estimated to have suffered sexual abuse from Spain's Catholic clergy, an independent commission has found. The details emerged from an unprecedented public investigation by Spain's ombudsman, who spoke of the "devastating impact" on victims.

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The Enfield Poltergeist: Why the unexplained mystery that shocked 1970s Britain continues to disturb

In August 1977, the police arrived at 284 Green Street in the north London suburb of Enfield. Peggy Hodgson, a single mother of four, reported that her two young daughters – Janet, aged 11, and older sister Margaret – had heard strange knocking. The source of the sound could not be determined.

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The scientists looking for alien vegetation

On the Orion arm of the Milky Way galaxy, around 93 million miles (150 million kilometres) from the yellow dwarf star it orbits, is a medium-sized rocky planet. At the edge of a vast southern ocean, are the gently lapping waters of a hot-pink lake.

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After a year of Elon Musk, what's next for X?

Senior Technology Reporters A year ago, having just bought Twitter, Elon Musk walked into its HQ carrying a sink. "Let that sink in" he quipped - then fired a large swathe of staff.

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The Beatles to release emotional 'final song', Now and Then, next week

More than 50 years after The Beatles broke up, the band have announced the release of their "last song". Called Now And Then, it is based on a 1970s demo recording by John Lennon, and was completed last year by Sir Paul McCartney and Sir Ringo Starr.

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Why artist David Shrigley has pulped 6,000 copies of The Da Vinci Code

The Turner Prize-nominated artist David Shrigley has pulped 6,000 copies of Dan Brown's best-seller The Da Vinci Code and republished them as George Orwell's novel 1984.

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If alien life is artificially intelligent, it may be stranger than we can imagine

It's taken more than four billion years for intelligent life to emerge by natural selection on Earth, but there are billions more years ahead in our planet's lifetime. Over that time, intelligence could develop in entirely new directions.

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The employees secretly using AI at work

Some employers are either tacitly or outright banning access to generative AI tools like ChatGPT. But employees who love them are finding ways to discreetly backchannel. Since OpenAI launched ChatGPT in November 2022, companies have scrambled to keep its workplace use under control.

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Archaeologists reveal face of Peru's 'Ice Maiden' mummy

Archaeologists have revealed a model showing what Peru's most famous mummy would have looked like. The mummy, known as "Juanita" or the "Inca Ice Maiden", was an Inca girl who is thought to have been sacrificed in a ritual more than 500 years.

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Why aliens might already know that humans exist

We've been searching the heavens for some time now. But despite decades of listening for tell-tale radio signals and hunting for signs that other worlds might be even vaguely habitable, it's been slim pickings so far.

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Brazil drought reveals ancient rock carvings of human faces

Image source, ReutersBBC NewsA drop in water levels of the Amazon has revealed rock carvings which had been mostly submerged since they were carved more than a thousand years ago. A severe drought means that the human faces carved into rocks on the shore can now be easily spotted.

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Corsica's Trinicellu: Europe's magnificent €50 train

The island of Corsica blends the rugged peaks of the Mediterranean's most mountainous island with azure beaches, colourful historic towns, lush woods and high plains. No wonder the ancient Greeks named it Kalliste (most beautiful).

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Iceland's PM to strike over gender pay gap

Tens of thousands of women in Iceland, including Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir, will refuse to work on Tuesday. The "kvennafri", or women's day off, has been called in protest at the gender pay gap and gender-based violence.

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Brussels shooting: Gunman who killed two Swedes had escaped Tunisian prison

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC News, BrusselsA gunman who shot dead two Swedish football fans in Brussels last Monday had escaped from prison in Tunisia.

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Skulls and flowers on parade at Mexico's Catrinas procession

Mexicans have been taking part in the Parade of the Catrinas, a lively procession of skeletons through Mexico City as they prepare to mark the Day of the Dead. Many participants were made up to look like La Catrina, the name given to an elegant skeletal figure popular in Mexican culture.

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Tsingtao: Video shows Chinese beer worker urinating into tank

Chinese authorities are investigating after a viral video appeared to show a worker from Tsingtao urinating into a tank, believed to contain ingredients for its popular beer. The clip received tens of millions of views on social media.

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Kota: Stricter rules for India student hub after suicides

Coaching centres in the northern Indian city of Kota are facing tighter regulations after a rise in the number of student suicides.

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The weird aliens of early science fiction

In October 1961, Betty and Barney Hill sat down with an astronomy lecturer at their home in New Hampshire, and made an extraordinary claim.

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I don't believe in free will. This is why.

Learn more about differential equations (and many other topics in maths and science) on Brilliant using the link https://brilliant.org/sabine. You can get started for free, and the first 200 will get 20% off the annual premium subscription. Do humans have free will or to the the laws of physics imp

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Kuda Bux: The Indian magician who charmed the West with his 'X-ray eyes'

There's nothing spectacular about a man riding a bicycle through a crowded street.

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Mangrove forests: Steely gaze of young tigress wins photo awards

Soham Bhattacharyya has been named overall winner of this year's Mangrove Photography Awards, for his image of an endangered tigress in the Sundarbans Biosphere Reserve, India.

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Pepper X: Eating world's hottest pepper was euphoric, says creator

Ed Currie eats, sleeps and breathes peppers. He calls it his "obsession". He starts "every morning with what is essentially pepper oil" in his coffee.

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Merho kondigt zijn opvolgers aan: scenarist Nix en tekenaar Charel Cambré nemen "De Kiekeboes" over

Striptekenaar Merho heeft zijn opvolgers bekendgemaakt: voortaan zullen Nix (als scenarist) en Charel Cambré (als tekenaar) de succesreeks "De Kiekeboes" in handen nemen. Merho kondigde deze zomer aan dat hij na 46 jaar stopt met tekenen. Maar wie de reeks zou overnemen, was nog niet geweten.

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Death row: The secret hunt for lethal drugs used in US executions

When the supply of drugs used for lethal injections began to run out, a couple of prison guards in the US had to go out and find another source. For over 20 years, Randy Workman was the man who walked people to their death.

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Black Holes vs Regular Holes

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Czech village priest sorry for smashing pumpkins

Father Jaromir Smejkal destroyed the carved pumpkins on two successive days in a park in Kurdejov, a village in the wine-making region of South Moravia. He has apologised for the vandalism in an open letter to the mayor and published on the village Facebook page.

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Gaganyaan: India to launch test flight ahead of sending man into space

The Indian space research agency is due to carry out the first of a series of key tests ahead of its planned mission to take astronauts into space in 2025. The Gaganyaan spacecraft is due to be launched at 08:00 local time (02:30GMT) on Saturday from Sriharikota.

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Kelvin Kiptum: From borrowing shoes to breaking world records

When Kelvin Kiptum lined up for his first major local competition in 2018, Kenya's new marathon icon did it in borrowed running shoes because he could not afford a pair of his own.

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Why Did Attosecond Physics Win the NOBEL PRIZE?

Check out the Space Time Merch Store https://www.pbsspacetime.com/shop PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Whenever we open

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AI tidies up Wikipedia’s references — and boosts reliability

You have full access to this article via your institution. Wikipedia lives and dies by its references, the links to sources that back up information in the online encyclopaedia.

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EU bids to tighten migration rules after attacks in Arras and Brussels

EU ministers have urged member states to do more to screen migrants and expel those regarded as a security risk, amid rising concerns over militant attacks.

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Gwyneth Paltrow says nepo baby label is an 'ugly moniker'

Gwyneth Paltrow has said calling someone a "nepo baby" is an "ugly moniker", and that children of famous people shouldn't be judged negatively. The term refers to suggestions of nepotism when a young person follows in their famous parents' footsteps.

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'Mannequin' arrested after Warsaw shop burglary

The 22-year-old was pictured standing still and holding a bag in a window of the store, which police have not named. Police said the accused went "hunting" in various departments after closing, before settling on a jewellery stand.

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Nvidia and iPhone maker Foxconn to build "AI factories"

The world's most valuable chip company Nvidia and iPhone maker Foxconn are joining forces to build so-called "AI factories". The firms say it is a new kind of data centre that uses Nvidia chips topower a "wide range" of applications.

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Microsoft's new AI assistant can go to meetings for you

Technology editorA ChatGPT-style AI assistant, developed by Microsoft and embedded into its office apps, will become available to all from 1 November, following trials.Microsoft 365 Copilot can summarise meetings held in Teams for anyone who chooses not to attend.

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MI5 head warns of 'epic scale' of Chinese espionage

More than 20,000 people in the UK have now been approached covertly online by Chinese spies, the head of MI5 said. It comes amid a new warning to tens of thousands of British businesses of the risk of having their innovation stolen.

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The four types of planetary civilizations, explained by Michio Kaku

Humanity is a type 0 civilization. Here’s what types 1, 2, and 3 look like, according to physicist Michio Kaku. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Is anybody out there? Renowned physicist Michio Kaku discusses we coul

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Police shoot man in hunt for Brussels gunman

Police in Brussels have shot a man amid a massive manhunt for the gunman who killed two Swedish nationals on Monday evening. The man was shot in a café in the Schaerbeek neighbourhood, local media reported.

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In search of the Old Ones: Where to find the world's longest-lived trees

The sycamore that stood in a gap in Hadrian's Wall in Northumberland, England, was "only" about 200 years old when last month it met a violent end. But the grief about its felling speaks to longer time frames.

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Brussels shooting: 'Europe shaken' after two Swedes shot dead

Two Swedish nationals have been shot dead and a third person injured in Brussels, in an attack which prosecutors are treating as terrorism. The Belgium-Sweden Euro 2024 qualifier football match being played in the city was abandoned.

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How unearthing diseases' ancient origins could help produce modern cures

In the 16th Century, in the country now known as Mexico, there was a sudden and dramatic drop in the population. Disease spread after Europeans conquered the territory and millions of indigenous people died as a result.

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New earthquake hits western Afghanistan

A new earthquake has hit western Afghanistan - several days after two large tremors in the region killed more than 1,000 people.The US Geological Survey (USGS) says the magnitude 6.3 quake was near the city of Herat. It was at a depth of 8.2km (five miles).

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China's roads win hearts in South Asia - but at a cost

Khunjerab in Pakistan is a high-altitude desert, a region that is both dry and cold. Surrounded by towering mountains, pristine glaciers and alpine meadows, this rocky landscape is home to some of the world's highest peaks.

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The Voice: Australians vote No in historic referendum

Australia has overwhelmingly rejected a plan to give greater political rights to Indigenous people in a referendum. All six states voted No to a proposal to amend the constitution to recognise First Nations people and create a body for them to advise the government.

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The mysterious monoliths of Meghalaya

It was a stroke of luck that brought me to the monoliths of Nartiang in Meghalaya on a February afternoon. Up until a decade or so ago, India's north-east, including the state of Meghalaya was considered too remote for most travellers.

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BBC show is a 'lifeline' for Afghan girls, UN says

Image source, Andy Bosley/BBCBBC World ServiceA BBC programme for children barred from schools in Afghanistan has been described as a "learning lifeline" by the United Nations.The show is being used in secret school lessons, the BBC has learned.

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JWST Discovered The Farthest Star Ever Seen!

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime To understand where we came from—how earth, the solar system, the galaxy became what t

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Nasa probe launches to metal asteroid Psyche

An American space agency (Nasa) probe has left Earth to visit one of the most unusual objects in the Solar System. The craft is heading to a metal world - an asteroid called 16 Psyche - which telescopic observations suggest is made from up to 60% iron and nickel.

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Sri Lanka crisis: Colombo reaches debt deal with China

Sri Lanka has confirmed that it has reached a deal with China, to restructure $4.2bn (£3.4bn) of debt. It has been trying to reach similar deals with a number of creditors to unlock the next tranche of a bailout.

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Japan asks court to dissolve 'Moonies' church over Shinzo Abe killing

The Japanese government has asked a court to order the dissolution of a church that was investigated after the assassination of former prime minister Shinzo Abe, local media reports. Abe's shock killing last July put the spotlight on the Unification Church, more popularly known as "Moonies".

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Day turned into night and the fighting stopped: How eclipses have shaped history

In one of the first widely read novels about time-travel, published in 1889, Mark Twain wrote about a man whose life was saved by an eclipse. In Twain's story, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, the protagonist Hank Morgan is knocked unconscious and wakes up in 6th-Century England.

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Can German engineering solve the challenges of fusion?

Last month the German government announced an additional €370m (£320m; $390m) in funding for nuclear fusion research and development. This brings the total budget earmarked for the next five years to €1bn.

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Slovakia elections: Populist winner signs deal to form coalition government

The winner of last month's parliamentary elections in Slovakia has agreed to form a coalition government. Robert Fico's populist left-wing Smer-SSD party won the vote with pledges to halt military aid to Ukraine, but denied being pro-Russian.

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Osiris-Rex: Nasa reveals first look at 'beautiful' asteroid sample

The UK scientist was in a select group to put first eyes and instruments on the rocky samples that have just been brought back from asteroid Bennu.

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The acute suicide crisis among veterinarians: 'You're always going to be failing somebody'

Last summer, a 36-year-old veterinarian named Andrea Kelly stopped by a Québec horse stable to check on a pair of one-month-old foals, and had a friendly visit with the farm's staff. Three days later, she was dead.

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Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Horseshoe crab wins gold

Image source, Laurent Ballesta/WPYScience correspondentA picture of a mysterious and other-worldly horseshoe crab has earned Laurent Ballesta the title of Wildlife Photographer of the Year (WPY) 2023.

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Ancient Life as Old as the Universe

✨ WORLDWIDE SHIPPING AVAILABLE ✨ The 12,024 Human Era Calendar has landed! https://shop.kgs.link/12024 Join us on an exploration of how different cosmic conditions could shape unique worlds and civilizations. Stocks are highly limited, so don’t miss your chance to own a truly special piece of

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To avert climate disaster, what if one rogue nation dimmed the Sun?

What if climate change became so intense that one country broke with international protocol to protect its people? In fiction, that scenario has already played out.

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Remaining debris from destroyed Titan sub found on Atlantic seabed

Engineers have recovered the rest of the debris and presumed human remains from the Titan submersible which imploded on an ill-fated trip to the Titanic, the US Coast Guard says. The craft was destroyed during a dive to the shipwreck in June.

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'Super-shoes', tumbling world records and the race for a sub two-hour official marathon

Marathon world records have tumbled over the past two weeks in the men's and women's races, though the main topic of conversation is not the athletes, but the role played by 'super-shoes'.

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Language Acquisition

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Afghanistan earthquake: More than 1,000 dead as villagers dig for survivors

Rescuers are digging for survivors of a powerful earthquake that flattened whole villages in Afghanistan, killing more than 1,000 people. The 6.3-magnitude quake struck Saturday morning in Herat province, a barren landscape dotted with mud brick homes.

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The Soviet spacecraft cemetery in the Pacific

In the middle of the South Pacific, around 2,688km (1,670 miles) from the nearest dry land, is a frigid patch of anonymous ocean – a deadly place of giant, ever-shifting swells, dramatic skies and storm-force winds.

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Why almost all coal was made at the same time

You can donate to #teamtrees by going to https://teamtrees.org or click the donate button. 100% of the money you donate with the button goes to the Arbor Day Foundation who will be planting the trees. Most of the coal on earth was created during a single short period of geological history 300 milli

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12 magnets show how viruses are built

The first 200 people to sign up at https://brilliant.org/stevemould/ will get 20% off an annual subscription that gives you access to the full archive of Daily Challenges and every single course. The way viruses self assemble from proteins that a jumbling around in an infected cell is really intere

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Why great thinkers ask divergent questions | Natalie Nixon

Asking the wrong questions can hold you back. @NatalieNixon explains how to ask divergent questions to become a great thinker. Join us for a live Q&A with Natalie 5/17 ► https://hopin.com/events/creativity-in-the-time-of-ai?utm_source=YouTube&utm_campaign=YouTube%20hero%20sign-ups Subscribe to B

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Afghanistan earthquake: At least 14 killed and 78 injured in 6.3 quake

At least 14 people have been killed and 78 injured after an earthquake hit western Afghanistan, officials say. The US Geological Survey said the 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck about 40km from the western city of Herat, close to the border with Iran, at around 11:00 local time (06:30 GMT).

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From The MIT Press Reader

By the time we realised that there was an extrasolar intruder, 'Oumuamua, named after the Hawaiian word for "scout", had already passed its closest point to the Sun and was leaving, as fast and stealthily as it had arrived.

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American tourist arrested for smashing Israel Museum statues

An American tourist has been arrested for allegedly smashing sculptures in the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. Images shared by Israeli police show the two ancient Roman statues, dating from the 2nd Century, lying broken on the floor of the museum.

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South Africa's Kruger National Park study: Animals fear human voices more than lions

Human voices cause considerably more fear in wild mammals than the sound of lions, a study in South Africa has found. Scientists played recordings of people talking normally through speakers hidden at water holes in the Kruger National Park.

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Amazon Kuiper: Jeff Bezos set to join satellite internet race

Jeff Bezos, the founder of the online retail giant Amazon, is about to expand his interests in space. He's set to launch two prototype satellites for a broadband mega-constellation he calls Project Kuiper.

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Australian man rowing across Pacific Ocean rescued after capsizing

Image source, Instagram @tom_._robinsonBBC NewsA man attempting to row across the Pacific Ocean in a homemade boat has been rescued by a cruise ship after his boat capsized.Tom Robinson, 24, hoped to become the youngest person to complete the feat.

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HotSat-1: Novel UK spacecraft maps heat variations across Earth

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.By Jonathan AmosScience correspondent@BBCAmosA novel UK satellite has returned its first pictures of heat variations across the surface of the Earth.

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The mysteries of a mass graveyard of early Indians

Scientists have unveiled a sprawling burial site in India belonging to one of the world's earliest urban civilisations. The BBC's Soutik Biswas delves into the clues the graves might give us about how the early Indians lived and died.

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Putin makes nuclear-powered Burevestnik missile test claim

Russia has held a "final successful test" of a nuclear-powered cruise missile, Vladimir Putin has claimed. The president's comments came after his spokesman rejected a New York Times report that testing of the weapon, known as the Burevestnik, was imminent.

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Stage that once hosted William Shakespeare found, claims Norfolk theatre

St George's Guildhall in King's Lynn is the oldest working theatre in the UK, dating back to 1445. During recent renovations, floorboards were found under the existing auditorium, and they have been dated back to the 15th Century.

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Bears, birds and kangaroos: Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards

The finalists in this year's Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards have been announced. Here is a selection of those that were whittled down from thousands of entries submitted from professional and amateur photographers from around the world, along with comment from the photographers.

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Why Korea is Dying Out

Go to https://brilliant.org/nutshell/ to dive deeper into these topics and more with a free 30-day trial + 20% off for the first 200 people! This video was sponsored by Brilliant. Thanks a lot for the support! If you want to support this channel and get something nice in return check out our shop:

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The weird hum coming from the start of the Universe

In the first few hundred thousand years after our Universe was born, a primordial hum ripped through a plasma of superheated particles. Scientists are listening in with the hope of gaining new insights about the mysterious force known as dark energy.

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Seychelles opposition leader Patrick Herminie charged with witchcraft

The main opposition leader in Seychelles, Patrick Herminie, has been charged with witchcraft, along with seven others. Police say the case is related to the discovery of two bodies exhumed from a cemetery on the island of Mahé.

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Charlotte Sena: Missing girl found using fingerprints on ransom note

Charlotte Sena, 9, disappeared on Saturday while riding her bicycle in New York state, triggering a huge 48-hour search by hundreds of people. Police then identified the suspect as the print was on their database linked to a drink-driving incident from 1999.

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Nobel Prize for 'attosecond physicists' Agostini, L'Huillier and Krausz

This year's Nobel Prize in Physics rewards experiments with light that capture "the shortest of moments" and opened a window on the world of electrons. The award goes to Pierre Agostini, Ferenc Krausz and Anne L'Huillier.

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Pope suggests Catholic Church could bless same-sex couples

Pope Francis has suggested he would be open to having the Catholic Church bless same-sex couples. Responding to a group of cardinals who asked him for clarity on the issue, he said any request for a blessing should be treated with "pastoral charity".

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The seed guardians in the Andes trying to save the potato

The potatoes that grow in the Andes of South America are far more than a starchy staple of the local diet. They are a rich part of the culture. "There's one really wonderfully beautiful potato, it looks almost like a rose.

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Greenland women seek compensation over involuntary birth control

BBC NewsA group of 67 women from Greenland are seeking compensation from the Danish government over a campaign of involuntary birth control in the 1960s.

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Pakistan police bust organ trafficking ring that took kidneys from hundreds

Eight members of an organ trafficking ring in north-east Pakistan have been arrested, police say. The ring's alleged leader, Fawad Mukhtar, is accused of extracting the kidneys of more than 300 people and transplanting them into rich clients.

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Tom Hanks warns dental plan ad image is AI fake

Tom Hanks has warned an advert that appears to be fronted by him is in fact an artificial intelligence (AI) fake. Hanks has previously spoken about the "artistic challenge" that AI poses his industry, and the issue has been central to recent strikes by high-profile Hollywood actors and writers.

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James Webb telescope makes 'JuMBO' discovery of planet-like objects in Orion

Jupiter-sized "planets" free-floating in space, unconnected to any star, have been spotted by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). What's intriguing about the discovery is that these objects appear to be moving in pairs. Astronomers are currently struggling to explain them.

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Migrants trying to reach the UK cross the Alps on foot

In a corner of the Italian Alps, a queue of Sudanese and Afghans are swapping their sandals for hiking boots and replacing flip-flops with sturdy trainers, preparing, they hope, for their trek to freedom.

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BBC Wales presenter Lucy Owen's eyesight saved by routine test

BBC NewsI have a confession to make.I haven't always been to the opticians as regularly as I should, despite being a devoted contact lens wearer since the age of 16.I often forgot to book the annual check-up before realising it had been three years since my last appointment.

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Is de overwinning van Robert Fico in Slovakije een eerste serieuze barst in de westerse eenheid ten aanzien van Oekraïne?

In Slovakije heeft Robert Fico zijn kiezers toegesproken na de overwinning van zijn links-populistische partij SMER-SD in de parlementsverkiezingen. Hij liet er geen twijfel over bestaan dat hij wel degelijk premier wil worden.

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Slovakia elections: Populist party wins vote but needs allies for coalition

Image source, EPABBC NewsA populist pro-Moscow party led by former PM Robert Fico has won Slovakia's parliamentary elections, with almost all votes counted.The Smer-SSD party had a clear lead with almost 24% of the vote despite exit polls suggesting victory by a liberal centrist party.

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Why haven’t we found aliens? A physicist shares the most popular theories. | Brian Cox

Chances are, we’re not alone in the universe. But if that’s true — why can’t we seem to find our neighbors? This question is known as the Fermi paradox, and it continues to go unsolved. However, some theories could offer potential solutions. Physicist Brian Cox explains the paradox and w

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Alien life in Universe: Scientists say finding it is 'only a matter of time'

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Norwegian family finds Viking-era relics while looking for earring

Image source, Cultural Heritage of Vestfold and Telemark County BBC NewsA family in Norway were searching for a lost gold earring in their garden when they decided to get their metal detector out.

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Europe's oldest shoe found in Spanish bat cave

Scientists say they have identified Europe's oldest shoes, sandals woven from grass thought to be around 6,000 years old. They were among a haul of ancient objects discovered in a bat cave in Spain plundered by miners in the 19th Century, but were analysed in a new study.

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Are Many Worlds & Pilot Wave THE SAME Theory?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to: http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime It’s hard to interpret the strange results of quantum mechanics, though many have tri

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The mysteries of the world's eighth continent

In 1820, a Russian ship packed with sailors and, oddly, penguins – destined for the men's dinner – spotted a towering shore of ice on the horizon. This was the first ever sighting of the Fimbul Ice Shelf, and it marked the official discovery of a new continent: Antarctica.

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Magpie swooping: How polarising bird terrorises suburban Australia

Don't run. Travel in groups. Carry an umbrella and wear sunglasses on the back of your head. These are some of the ominous warnings issued in Australia each spring, as magpies and humans begin their annual turf war.

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BBC helps free suspected migrants stuck in refrigerated lorry

Six suspected migrants have been rescued from the back of a lorry in France, after the BBC helped track them down and alert the police. The four Vietnamese women and two Iraqi women were trapped inside, panicking and struggling to breathe. One of them spoke to the BBC from inside the lorry.

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ChatGPT can now access up to date information

OpenAI, the Microsoft-backed creator of ChatGPT, has confirmed the chatbot can now browse the internet to provide users with current information. The artificial intelligence-powered system was previously trained using data up to September 2021.

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What does spending more than a year in space do to the human body?

With a few handshakes, a brief photoshoot and a wave, Nasa astronaut Frank Rubio bid farewell to the American-football-field-sized collection of modules and solar panels that has been his home for the past 371 days.

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Scientists get closer to solving mystery of antimatter

Scientists have made a key discovery about antimatter - a mysterious substance which was plentiful when the Universe began. Antimatter is the opposite of matter, from which stars and planets are made.

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Lady Elliot Island: A paradise island where you make a pledge

Master Reef Guide Kirsty Whitman didn't need to tell me twice.

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The ancient Sri Lankan 'tank cascades' tackling drought

Each April, in the village of Maeliya in northwest Sri Lanka, Pinchal Weldurelage Siriwardene gathers his community under the shade of a large banyan tree. The tree overlooks a human-made body of water called a wewa – meaning reservoir or "tank" in Sinhala.

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Offshore wind: Trump blames whale deaths on turbines

Former US President Donald Trump has claimed that wind turbines off the coast of the US "are causing whales to die in numbers never seen before". These claims have attracted significant attention on social media, where a clip of Mr Trump's speech has now been viewed more than nine million times.

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The Creator film review: A 'jaw-droppingly distinctive' sci-fi

The Creator belongs to an endangered species, in that it's a Hollywood science-fiction epic that isn't based on a video game, a comic, or a film you've seen already. That doesn't mean that it's wholly original.

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Chess grandmaster Hans Niemann denies using vibrating sex toy to cheat

An American grandmaster who was part of a row which rattled the world of chess has denied using a vibrating sex toy to cheat. In September 2022 Hans Niemann sat down to play Norwegian grandmaster Magnus Carlsen in chess's Sinquefield Cup St Louis, Missouri.

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Spotify will not ban AI-made music, says boss

The boss of Spotify says he has no plans to completely ban content created by artificial intelligence from the music streaming platform. Earlier this year the platform pulled a track featuring AI-cloned voices of the performers Drake and The Weeknd.

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Why do the worst people rise to power? | Brian Klaas

Why do the worst people rise to power? University College London professor Brian Klaas responds. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, Why psychopaths rise to power ► https://youtu.be/PpyIZ4DGIK8 George Washingt

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Metaverse: What happened to Mark Zuckerberg's next big thing?

There was a time before ChatGPT when the tech world was talking about something entirely different. Remember the metaverse?

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Cat missing for 11 years reunited with owner

Daisy the cat failed to return home soon after moving to the Caerphilly area from Dorset with her owner, Sian Sexton, in 2012. But last week, Ms Sexton received a surprise phone call from a Caerphilly vet who said a cat microchipped to her had been brought into the clinic.

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Australian lethal mushroom mystery survivor leaves hospital

In July, Erin Patterson cooked a beef Wellington using mushrooms which killed three relatives. Police believe the victims had eaten death cap mushrooms, which are lethal if ingested. Ian Wilkinson was also left in a critical condition after eating them.

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A cut too far: The people who can't give up paper

For 400 years British hydrographers have made paper charts of the world's seas and oceans. Each one captures the detail of coastlines, bays, straits, or channels.

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The shadowy Chinese firms that own chunks of Cambodia

The highway runs through the forest like a black ribbon, down to the sea and to what must be one of the world's largest tourism projects. Fifteen years after it began, there is still not much to see of the Dara Sakor Seashore Resort in southern Cambodia.

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Man gored to death by bull at Spanish festival

The man, 61, was gored in his side during the event in the town of Pobla de Farnals in the Valencia region on Saturday. He underwent emergency surgery but died on Sunday. His friend, 63, was attacked in both leg by the same bull and is in a stable condition in hospital.

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Ethiopia's Tigist Assefa sets women's marathon world record in Berlin

Ethiopia's Tigist Assefa broke the women's marathon world record as she won Sunday's race in Berlin. The 29-year-old, who also won last year's race, crossed the line in a time of two hours, 11 minutes and 53 seconds.

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Art: 10-year mission to paint everyone in St Davids

Ten years ago, artist Grahame Hurd-Wood set himself a huge challenge. He resolved to paint an individual portrait of every resident of the city he lives in.

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Russell Brand accuser sparks debate about staggered age of consent

At 16, you can't legally drink alcohol, place a bet or vote in a general election - but you can consent to sex. It has been this way since 1885 in the UK, when the age of consent was raised from 13.

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AI-generated naked child images shock Spanish town of Almendralejo

BBC News, AlmendralejoA sleepy town in southern Spain is in shock after it emerged that AI-generated naked images of young local girls had been circulating on social media without their knowledge.

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Osiris-Rex: Nasa confirms return of asteroid Bennu samples

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.in Dugway, UtahDusty samples from the "most dangerous known rock in the Solar System" have been brought to Earth.The American space agency Nasa landed the materials in a capsule that came down in the West Desert of Utah state.

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Lampedusa: Inside the camp at the heart of Europe’s migrant surge

Thousands of migrants arrived on the shores of Lampedusa last week, overloading local resources on the Italian island. BBC Trending's Reha Kansara and Newsnight's Emir Nader visited the holding centre, also known as the "Hotspot", where migrants are held. Lampedusa's Hotspot has seen busier days.

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James Nachtwey: The last of the great photojournalists

South East Asia correspondentA woman has just discovered the bodies of her husband and brother in her garden in Bucha, a suburb of the Ukrainian capital Kyiv. The bodies are dusted with frost. She lays one hand on her brother, while the fingers of her other hand touch her mouth.

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Long Covid: MRI scans reveal new clues to symptoms

People living with long Covid after being admitted to hospital are more likely to show some damage to major organs, according to a new study. MRI scans revealed patients were three times more likely to have some abnormalities in multiple organs such as the lungs, brain and kidneys.

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Charlie Chaplin - Boxing Match (City Lights, 1931)

• A classic scene from City Lights in which Charlie Chaplin ends up in a boxing match with a prizefighter (Hank Mann). © Roy Export SAS • Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/TheChaplinFilms • Listen to Full Soundtrack on Youtube: http://bit.ly/CityLightsSoundtrack • Download Charlie Cha

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Guantanamo defendant 'too damaged' to stand trial

BBC NewsA military judge at Guantanamo Bay has ruled one of the five defendants charged over the 9/11 attacks is not fit to stand trial in a death-penalty case.

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Osiris-Rex: Asteroid Bennu 'is a journey back to our origins'

Nasa's Osiris-Rex capsule will come screaming into Earth's atmosphere on Sunday at more than 15 times the speed of a rifle bullet. It will make a fireball in the sky as it does so, but a heat shield and parachutes will slow the descent and bring it into a gentle touchdown in Utah's West Desert.

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Beyond the Colosseum: Eight sites that reveal Rome's hidden history

Currently trending is the surprising notion that many men think frequently about the Roman Empire – something that speaks to the enduring appeal of an empire that thrived some 2,000 years ago.

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Zoom and Grindr return to office: Tech's surprising remote work U-turn

In August, Grindr gave its workers a return-to-office ultimatum: either agree to work twice a week in person from October, or lose their jobs.

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Google accused of directing motorist to drive off collapsed bridge

The family of a US man who drowned after driving off a collapsed bridge are claiming that he died because Google failed to update its maps. Philip Paxson's family are suing the company over his death, alleging that Google negligently failed to show the bridge had fallen nine year earlier.

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The children leaving the Mafia

Claudia Caramanna has only been in her role two years and her work is already attracting unwanted attention. A year ago, an anonymous letter with a hand-drawn cross on it was sent to her home.

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Venezuela sends 11,000 troops to retake prison

Venezuela has sent 11,000 troops to regain control of one of its biggest prisons that had been overrun by a powerful criminal gang. The Tocoron prison, in the north of the country, was under the control of the Tren de Aragua mega-gang for years.

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xkcd Phone Flip

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Half-million-year-old wooden structure unearthed

Image source, Geoff DullerScience correspondent, BBC NewsThe discovery of ancient wooden logs in the banks of a river in Zambia has changed archaeologists' understanding of ancient human life. Researchers found evidence the wood had been used to build a structure almost half a million years ago.

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Japan: One in 10 people aged 80 or older for first time

For the first time ever, more than one in 10 people in Japan are now aged 80 years or older. Official data released to mark Japan's annual Respect for Aged Day holiday also shows the proportion of Japanese over 65 at a record of 29.1% this year.

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Danish artist told to repay museum €67,000 after turning in blank canvasses

Image source, Getty ImagesA Danish artist has been ordered to return nearly 500,000 kroner (€67,000) to a museum after he supplied it with two blank canvasses for a project he named "Take the Money and Run".

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Antarctic sea-ice at 'mind-blowing' low alarms experts

The sea-ice surrounding Antarctica is well below any previous recorded winter level, satellite data shows, a worrying new benchmark for a region that once seemed resistant to global warming. An unstable Antarctica could have far-reaching consequences, polar experts warn.

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The 'cosmic dust' sitting on your roof

It's in the dirt on the ground, the debris on your roof, and the dust that tickles your nose – tiny pieces of "cosmic dust", everywhere. These microscopic particles from outer space are micrometeorites – mostly the debris from comets and asteroids – and they have settled all over our planet.

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Scientists discover how brain cells die in Alzheimer’s

Scientists in the UK and Belgium think they have figured out how brain cells die in Alzheimer's disease. It has been a mystery and a source of scientific debate for decades.

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Taiwan tells Elon Musk it is 'not for sale'

Taiwan has told billionaire Elon Musk it is "not for sale" after he said the island was a part of China. At a business summit this week, Mr Musk compared Taiwan to Hawaii, calling it an "integral part" of China.

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Quest to bring priest charged with torture in Argentina to justice

Survivors of crimes committed by the 1970s military junta in Argentina are fighting to see a priest stand trial for his alleged role in kidnappings and torture against opponents of the regime.

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Should we be worried about older politicians?

Pauline Newman, now 96, holds a lifetime position as a US federal judge. Though she wants to carry on working, she's in the midst of lawsuits with colleagues who want her to retire. The US has become a hotspot for debates about whether people in the political sphere can ever be too old to lead.

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Nasa's UFO report: What we learned from UAP study

BBC NewsA Nasa probe into hundreds of UFO sightings found there was no evidence aliens are behind unexplained phenomena, but the space agency also could not rule out that possibility.If the truth is out there, this long-awaited report offers no conclusive evidence.

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France's Carrefour puts up 'shrinkflation' warning signs

French supermarket Carrefour has put stickers on its shelves this week warning shoppers of "shrinkflation" - where packet contents are getting smaller while prices are not. Lipton Ice Tea, Lindt chocolate and Viennetta ice cream are among the products being named and shamed.

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Libya flood: Satellite images and aerial photographs show destruction

Satellite images show the scale of destruction in the Libyan port of Derna after floodwaters swept away bridges, streets and communities - leaving thousands of people missing or dead.

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VRT-presentatrice Siska Schoeters laat zich ontdopen na "Godvergeten": "Alle banden met de Kerk doorknippen"

Presentatrice Siska Schoeters dient een verzoek in om zich te laten ontdopen. Ze doet dat na het bekijken van twee afleveringen van de documentairereeks "Godvergeten". Schoeters wil naar eigen zeggen niks meer te maken hebben met het instituut van de Kerk.

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Pachucos: The Latinx subculture that defied the US

The door to the bedroom closet opened wide, revealing dozens of brightly coloured zoot suits and shoes. On a nearby table, there were a wide-brimmed hat with feathers, a chain watch, suspenders and a pair of rhinestone cufflinks.

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'Overwhelming consensus' on AI regulation - Musk

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsTesla CEO Elon Musk says there was "overwhelming consensus" for regulation on artificial intelligence after tech heavyweights gathered in Washington to discuss AI.

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Why are women less likely to ask questions in public?

Over the years I've presented dozens of radio shows and chaired hundreds of public events in front of live audiences. The Q&A at the end is an important part of the session and so I want everyone to feel comfortable enough to ask their burning question.

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What NEW SCIENCE Would We Discover with a Moon Telescope?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime In order to see the faint light from objects in deepest space, astronomers go to the dar

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Princess Martha Louise: Norway's princess sets date to wed shaman

Norway's Princess Martha Louise will marry her American partner, self-styled shaman Durek Verrett, next summer, the couple has announced. King Harald V congratulated the pair, saying he was happy to welcome Mr Verrett to his family.

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France halts iPhone 12 sales over radiation levels

France has ordered Apple to stop selling the iPhone 12 for emitting too much electromagnetic radiation. On Tuesday, the French watchdog which governs radio frequencies also told the tech giant to fix existing phones.

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Ex-Secret Service agent reveals new JFK assassination detail

Six decades later, new details are still coming to light in one of the most scrutinised events in American history: the assassination of President John F Kennedy.

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What to know about the 'beach towel revolt' taking back Greek beaches

It was around sunset on Sunday 3 September in Paros, a popular holiday island in Greece's Cycladic region. A crowd of around 50 were gathered on Parikia beach, close to the island's main port. Behind them, the sky blazed a deep orange over the azure sea.

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Switzerland: Hundreds of sex abuse cases 'tip of the iceberg', say researchers

An official inquiry into the Roman Catholic Church in Switzerland has identified nearly a thousand cases of sexual abuse since 1950. Many involved children and 56% of the victims were male. The vast majority of the accused were men.

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We Did The Math - You Are Dead!

To get started planning a fulfilling career that does a lot of good, go to https://80000hours.org/kurzgesagt for your free career guide. Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources-boltzmannbrain/startseite?authuser=2 Absolutely everything you think about yourself and the univ

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French woman shot through wall in Marseille drug shooting dies

Image source, AFPBBC NewsA 24-year-old woman has died after a stray bullet aimed at a drug-dealing hotspot hit her in the head in her flat in the French city of Marseille.The bullet was fired at random and pierced a window panel in the woman's bedroom, prosecutors said.

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Tantalising sign of possible life on faraway world

Nasa's James Webb Space Telescope may have discovered tentative evidence of a sign of life on a faraway planet. It may have detected a molecule called dimethyl sulphide (DMS). On Earth, at least, this is only produced by life.

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Stolen Van Gogh handed to Dutch art sleuth in Ikea bag

Image source, Arthur BrandBBC NewsA Van Gogh painting stolen from a Dutch museum in March 2020 is back in safe hands after a three-and-a-half-year quest to recover it.

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Soviet invasions of Hungary and Czechoslovakia were wrong, Putin says

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said the Soviet invasions of Hungary and Czechoslovakia were wrong. Speaking at a forum in eastern Russia, he said it is not right to do anything in foreign policy that harms the interests of other people.

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Libya floods: Derna city looks like a tsunami hit it - minister

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsThe death toll from floods in Libya in one city alone stands at more than 1,500, a minister who visited the eastern port of Derna has told the BBC.

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Boy, aged seven, climbs Old Man of Hoy sea stack

BBC Scotland NewsA seven-year-old boy from America is believed to have become the youngest person to climb the Old Man of Hoy, off the coast of Orkney.Cody Weishaar scaled the 449ft (137m) sea stack with his father and three of his friends in early August.

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Ruby Franke and 8 passengers: The rise and fall of a parenting influencer

A woman who sprang to fame giving controversial parenting advice has been charged with six counts of child abuse. What happened to Ruby Franke and her family?

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xkcd: Gold

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French shrug off Muslim upset at abaya ban in schools

Why should a teenage girl not be able to express her religious beliefs and at the same time pursue an education at school? It is a tough question, but one to which the French believe they have an answer.

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Morocco earthquake: More than 2,000 dead as tremors felt in several regions

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsA strong earthquake of magnitude 6.8 has struck central Morocco, killing more than 2,000 people and causing severe damage in several areas.

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Elon Musk says he withheld Starlink over Crimea to avoid escalation

Elon Musk says he refused to give Kyiv access to his Starlink communications network over Crimea to avoid complicity in a "major act of war". Kyiv had sent an emergency request to activate Starlink to Sevastopol, home to a major Russian navy port, he said.

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The fear of a nuclear fire that would consume Earth

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South Korean cult Grace Road Church members arrested in Fiji

Four suspected high-ranking members of a South Korean doomsday cult have been arrested in Fiji. Two were deported, but a legal injunction prevented the others from being ejected, Fiji media report.

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Period trackers to be reviewed over data concerns

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) is reviewing period and fertility trackers over data security concerns. The apps work by plotting menstrual cycles, based on user information.

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Aditya-L1: India's solar mission on way to Sun sends first photos

The Indian space agency Isro has shared the first images sent by the country's solar observation mission as it makes its way towards the Sun. Aditya-L1 lifted off on Saturday and is on a journey that will take it 1.5 million km (932,000 miles) from the Earth - 1% of the Earth-Sun distance.

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How AI may be a powerful tool in treating male infertility

Infertility affects 7% of the male population. Now artificial intelligence (AI) may be about to help solve the problem.

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Florida man arrested after trying to cross Atlantic in hamster wheel vessel

Image source, Flagler County Sheriff's OfficeBBC NewsA Florida man was arrested after trying to "run to London" across the Atlantic Ocean in a homemade vessel resembling a hamster wheel. The US Coast Guard intercepted Reza Baluchi about 70 miles (110km) off Tybee Island, Georgia on 26 August.

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Scientists grow whole model of human embryo, without sperm or egg

Scientists have grown an entity that closely resembles an early human embryo, without using sperm, eggs or a womb. The Weizmann Institute team say their "embryo model", made using stem cells, looks like a textbook example of a real 14-day-old embryo.

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Dead Sea reveals four 1,900-year-old Roman swords in cave

Image source, Amir Ganor/Israel Antiquities AuthorityBBC NewsA cache of four excellently-preserved Roman swords and a javelin have been discovered by Israeli researchers in a cave overlooking the Dead Sea.

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What we can learn from California's surfing sea otter

At first it looks like she is up to her usual tricks again. A southern sea otter, with her thick, dark fur glistening with water – as though she has been dipped in tar – is floating along in the foamy waves off the coast of Santa Cruz, California. On a surfboard.

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French state schools turn away dozens of girls wearing Muslim abaya dress

The French education minister has said that nearly 300 pupils arrived at school on Monday wearing the abaya, the long Muslim robe which was banned in schools last week. Most of the girls agreed to change into other clothes.

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Woody Allen greeted by cheers, praise and protests at Venice Film Festival

Woody Allen's return to the Venice Film Festival was greeted with cheers and positive reviews from some, but also by loud protests on the red carpet at the premiere of the US director's new film. Most reviews called Coup De Chance, Allen's first film entirely in French, his best work in a decade.

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How worrying is a Russia-Kim Jong Un alliance?

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's reported plans to visit Russia this month have caused concern among the US and its allies. He and President Vladimir Putin intend to discuss the possibility of North Korea providing Moscow with weapons to support its war in Ukraine, US officials say.

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China: Great Wall damaged by workers looking for shortcut

Image source, Youyu County Police ReleaseBBC News A part of China's Great Wall has been severely damaged by construction workers in central Shanxi province, who used an excavator to dig through it. Police say two men are suspected of trying to create a shortcut for their construction work.

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Somalis with albinism: Pelted with stones and raw eggs

Referring to the stigma he faces in Somalia because he has albinism, 25 year-old Elmi Bile Mohamed says: "People tell me I am a cannibal and that I will eat their children. They are terrified of me."

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Collatz Conjecture in Color - Numberphile

The Great Courses Plus (free trial): http://ow.ly/RqOr309wT7v This video features Alex Bellos. More info and links in full description. Extra footage with Alex and coloring: https://youtu.be/w8nc8wbgXPU Or real-time video of the coloring: https://youtu.be/wH141HLD57o Our previous Collatz Conjectur

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UNCRACKABLE? The Collatz Conjecture - Numberphile

Catch David on the Numberphile podcast: https://youtu.be/9y1BGvnTyQA Professor David Eisenbud on the infamous Collatz Conjecture, a simple problem that mathematicians may not be "ready" to crack. More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ Extra footage from this interview: https://youtu

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Violent protests after Quran burning in Sweden

Three men have been arrested in connection with a violent riot following a Quran burning in Sweden. Unrest erupted after an Iraqi anti-Islam activist Salwan Momika set fire to a copy of the Islamic holy book on Sunday.

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Moon base: Bangor scientists design fuel to live in space

Scientists have developed an energy source which could allow astronauts to live on the Moon for long periods of time. The NASA-led Artemis Program hopes for an outpost on the Moon by around 2030.

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Macron looks on as France's Africa policy crumbles

Why is it so often that problems seem to get worse just when they ought to be getting better?

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The unexpected maths problem at work during the women's World Cup

There was something strange about the recent Women's World Cup in Australia. If you were paying close attention, you might have spotted it. Many of the international teams had players who were born on the same day of the year – they shared birthdays. What was going on?

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Abba's Agnetha Fältskog returns with solo song: 'I didn't know if I could do this'

Abba's Agnetha Fältskog has revealed her first new music in 10 years, a solo song called Where Do We Go From Here? The star says she was was lured back to the studio by producer Jörgen Elofsson, who oversaw her 2013 album, A.

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Andrew Tate: Chats in 'War Room' suggest dozens of women groomed

Evidence that dozens of women were groomed into online sex work by members of influencer Andrew Tate's "War Room" group has been uncovered by the BBC. Leaked internal chat logs identify 45 potential victims between March 2019 and April 2020 but the total number is likely to be higher.

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Wildlife Photographer of the Year: ghostly face or fish?

What do you see when you look at this photo? The image appears to show an enormous, scary face suddenly emerging from the ocean.

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Gabon coup leaders name General Brice Oligui Nguema as new leader

Army officers who seized power in a coup in Gabon on Wednesday have named General Brice Oligui Nguema as the West African state's transitional leader. Gen Nguema was earlier carried triumphally through the streets of the capital Libreville by his troops.

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Why there's a rush to explore the Moon's enigmatic South Pole

It's a place where no human-made object has trundled before. Last week, however, the diminutive Pragyaan rover slid down a ramp from its mothership, India's Vikram lander, and began exploring the region around the Moon's South Pole.

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Why young children don't understand 'pranks'

A small boy in a dinosaur shirt stands at a countertop in front of an empty bowl, looking expectant. Next to him, a woman – apparently his caregiver – holds an egg. As he watches, she goes to crack it – and smacks it on his forehead, not the bowl. "Ow!" he says, rubbing his head.

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Chess rivals settle long-running cheating dispute

Image source, Getty ImagesBBC NewsA Norwegian world champion and the US prodigy who unexpectedly beat him have resolved a year-long cheating row that rattled the world of chess.Magnus Carlsen accused Hans Niemann of foul play after he lost in the Sinquefield Cup in September.

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How robotaxis are dividing San Francisco

My heartbeat quickens just a little as the cab approaches. It's a bizarre sight, one that I thought I wouldn't see in my lifetime. The cab has no driver. It stops in front of me and invites me to unlock its door with my phone - before whisking me into the night.

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Amsterdam: The European capital fighting bad tourists

The Dutch capital is one of the most-visited cities in Europe, with its 800,000-person population welcoming up to 20 million tourists a year.

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France to ban female students from wearing abayas in state schools

Students will be banned from wearing abaya, a loose-fitting full-length robe worn by some Muslim women, in France's state-run schools, the education minister has said. The rule will be applied as soon as the new school year starts on 4 September.

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Hallstatt: Austrian town protests against mass tourism

Locals in the Austrian town of Hallstatt have taken part in a protest against mass tourism. Hallstatt, which is a World Heritage Site, has just over 700 inhabitants - but gets up to as many as 10,000 visitors a day during high season.

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Afghanistan: Taliban ban women from visiting national park

The Taliban have banned women from visiting the Band-e-Amir national park in the central Bamiyan province. Afghanistan's acting minister of virtue and vice, Mohammad Khaled Hanafi, said women had not been observing hijab inside the park.

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The rival to the Panama Canal that was never built

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Franklin expedition: Portraits of doomed Arctic explorers go to auction

An original portrait photograph of a famous Arctic explorer, taken shortly before the doomed Franklin expedition, will be auctioned in London next month. Capt Francis Crozier and 13 other senior officers were photographed in May of 1845.

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Heineken sells off Russian beer business for €1

Heineken has finally sold off its Russian business for €1 - or 86p - nearly a year and a half after first pledging to do so. The Dutch brewer said it will take a loss of €300m on the division, which is being offloaded to Russia's Arnest, which makes aerosol cans.

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Praggnanandhaa: India chess prodigy's 'remarkable' impact on the sport

Indian chess prodigy R Praggnanandhaa's World Cup run has ended without a trophy, but experts say that his stellar performances will have a monumental impact on the game in the country.

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88 UK deaths linked to Canada 'poison seller'

Eighty-eight people in the UK died after buying a poisonous substance from a seller in Canada, the National Crime Agency (NCA) has said. The NCA says it cannot confirm the chemical was the direct cause of the deaths in the UK but is investigating potential criminal offences.

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The place where no humans will tread for 100,000 years

I'm always upbeat on the way to interviews. To me they're the most enjoyable part of the storytelling process. But this time I feel different.

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What If Space is NOT Empty?

To Learn More About Surfshark Check Out: http://surfshark.deals/spacetime PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Spacetime on

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Gaslighting and shame: Uncovering the stories of Ireland's Magdalene Laundries

The Magdalene Laundries were back in the spotlight recently following the death of Irish singer Sinead O'Connor, who spent time in one of the former asylums as a teenager. A new BBC drama examines the impact of the abuse which took place at some of these notorious institutions.

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The curious ways your skin shapes your health

I'm canoeing through the Ardèche gorge in southern France – and attracting some peculiar looks. It's early afternoon on a blazing July day, and the sky is a perfect canvas of cobalt blue.

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What we know about Russia plane crash that reportedly killed Prigozhin

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsWagner mercenary chief Yevgeny Prigozhin is presumed dead, having been named on the passenger list of a private jet that crashed north of the Russian capital, Moscow.

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Chandrayaan-3: India makes historic landing near Moon's south pole

India has made history as its Moon mission became the first to land in the lunar south pole region. With this, India joins an elite club of countries to achieve a soft landing on the Moon, after the US, the former Soviet Union and China.

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Chandrayaan-3: India's Moon lander Vikram aims for historic lunar south pole landing

India is looking to make history on Wednesday with its third lunar mission is set to land on the Moon. If Chandrayaan-3 is successful, India will be the first country to land near its little-explored south pole.

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How hunger can warp our minds

Diets are widely celebrated as the noble, often celebrity-endorsed, route towards improved health and wellness – and form the basis of a booming $250bn (£203bn) industry. But let's face it: dieting can also be miserable.

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How A Nuclear War Will Start - Minute by Minute

This video was made possible through a grant by Open Philanthropy. Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources-mr-president/ Join us over on Discord to discuss and share your thoughts: https://kgs.link/Discord Mr. President! Nuclear missiles will strike our country in 14 minut

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Pakistan cable car incident as rescue under way for eight people trapped

Image source, Pakistan National Disaster Management AgencyBBC NewsA rescue is under way in Pakistan for eight people - including six children - trapped in a cable car dangling over a valley in the country's north-west.

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Did JWST Discover Dark Matter Stars?

Check Out Human Footprint on PBS Terra: https://youtu.be/-c_KBWyPGaQ PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime We knew that the J

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Is this the summer of bad tourists?

This summer, every day seems to bring another headline of tourists around the world behaving badly. Last week, it was two drunk Americans sneaking into a closed section of the Eiffel Tower and sleeping off their bender high above Paris.

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Pioneering wind-powered cargo ship sets sail

Shipping firm Cargill, which has chartered the vessel, hopes the technology will help the industry chart a course towards a greener future. Using the wing-sized rigid WindWings sails aims to cut fuel consumption and therefore shipping's carbon footprint.

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Hundreds of migrants killed by Saudi border guards - report

Saudi border guards are accused of the mass killing of migrants along the Yemeni border in a new report by Human Rights Watch. The report says hundreds of people, many of them Ethiopians who cross war-torn Yemen to reach Saudi Arabia, have been shot dead.

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Chandrayaan-3: The race to unravel the mysteries of Moon's south pole

The sun lingers slightly above or just below the horizon, while towering mountains project dark shadows. Deep craters provide a haven for unending darkness. Some of these areas have been shielded from sunlight for billions of years.

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Baghdad advertising boards turned off over porn screening

Iraqi officials have ordered all electronic advertising screens to be shut down in Baghdad after a hacker used one to show a pornographic film. It happened at a major road junction in the Iraqi capital. Videos have been shared widely on social media.

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Russia's Luna-25 spacecraft crashes into Moon

Russia's unmanned Luna-25 spacecraft has crashed into the Moon after spinning out of control, officials say. It was Russia's first Moon mission in almost 50 years.

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Vietnam War: The pastor who survived 17 years in forgotten jungle army

Pastor Y Hin Nie, 75, preaches the gospel from the comfort of his church in the US state of North Carolina. But as a young man he survived nearly two decades in the jungle, giving sermons to his comrades fighting Vietnamese troops long after the war had ended - his AK-47 never far from his side.

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Van "De Wollebollen" tot "De seizoensfinale": 164 avonturen voor de familie Kiekeboe dankzij striptekenaar Merho

Na 164 albums houdt Robert Merhottein, beter gekend als Merho, het voor bekeken. Hij stopt met "de Kiekeboes". De familie zag 46 jaar geleden het licht, en groeide uit van een wekelijkse krantenstrip tot de populairste stripreeks van Vlaanderen, met meer dan 25 miljoen verkochte exemplaren. 

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Did Australia's boomerangs pave the way for flight?

The aircraft is one of the most significant developments of modern society, enabling people, goods and ideas to fly around the world far more efficiently than ever before.

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Russian priest censured for blessing Stalin statue

Image source, ReutersBBC NewsA Russian Orthodox priest is under investigation after he was filmed blessing a new statue of the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. The incident happened on Tuesday at the unveiling of the eight-metre (26ft) monument in the city of Velikiye Luki.

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Stunning photos of a new African wonder

Legend has it that the dramatic rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were created with the help of a team of angels.

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Graham Linehan: Second venue cancels Father Ted writer's comedy show

Image source, PA MediaA second Edinburgh venue has cancelled a stand-up comedy show featuring Father Ted writer Graham Linehan, according to organisers. Hours before the gig was due to begin, Comedy Unleashed said it would still go ahead despite the new cancellation.

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How to have "real" orgasms | Emily Nagoski

The best orgasms come when you learn how to unlock a sexual “flow state.” Emily Nagoski, a sex educator, shares a meditation to help you get started. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, How to have better se

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Pakistan: Mob burns churches over blasphemy claims

Thousands of Muslims in Pakistan have set fire to churches and vandalised homes belonging to Christians over claims that two men had desecrated the Quran, police say. The attacks took place in Jaranwala in the province of eastern Punjab.

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It's Impossible To Destroy A Black Hole – We Did It Anyway

Go ‘beyond the nutshell’ at https://brilliant.org/nutshell/ and dive deeper into these topics and more with a free 30-day trial! This video was sponsored by Brilliant. Thanks a lot for the support! Grab your Limited Edition Wheel of Fear Pin before the pre-order ends!: https://shop.kgs.link/fea

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How undercover sting outwitted pangolin traffickers

The leaders of a global wildlife trafficking gang have been convicted after a four-year investigation and a trial in Nigeria. They pleaded guilty last month to smuggling the scales of endangered African pangolins.

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The ancient technology keeping space missions alive

It took more than 10 years to design and build Europe's four identical Cluster satellites for launch; and just 39 seconds to lose them all in an enormous fireball. Their remains rained down over the South American jungle as the Ariane 5 rocket veered off course and exploded.

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Texas woman awarded $1.2bn in revenge porn case

The woman, who was named only by the initials DL in court documents, filed a harassment lawsuit against her former boyfriend in 2022. The suit alleged that he posted intimate pictures of her online to "publicly shame" her after a break-up.

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Five key moments in the crushing of Afghan women's rights

"We are going to allow women to study and work within our framework. Women are going to be very active in our society," the Taliban announced in their first press conference shortly after seizing power on 15 August 2021.

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How 'the fidget factor' improves health

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Talking to the Taliban: Right or wrong?

Two years since the Taliban swept into power in Afghanistan, not a single country has formally recognised their rule. Even engaging with the Taliban government remains deeply controversial.

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England's mysterious sunken roads

The path began to descend into the earth as if burrowed out in ancient times by the slithering of a giant worm. As we followed it downwards, the atmosphere changed: the wind became still, the air warmer. The plant life changed, too, the verges of the path becoming a jungle of curling ferns.

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Fourteen days across the Atlantic, perched on a ship’s rudder

Four Nigerian stowaways set out for Europe on the rudder of a tanker. They had no idea they were bound for Brazil, and a two-week ocean voyage that would nearly kill them.

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Big freeze drove early humans out of Europe

Science correspondentA big freeze previously unknown to science drove early humans from Europe for 200,000 years, but they adapted and returned, new research shows.Ocean sediments from 1.1 million years ago show temperatures suddenly dropped more than 5C, scientists say.

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Scientists at Fermilab close in on fifth force of nature

Scientists near Chicago say they may be getting closer to discovering the existence of a new force of nature. They have found more evidence that sub-atomic particles, called muons, are not behaving in the way predicted by the current theory of sub-atomic physics.

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Boy, 6, boasted about shooting Virginia teacher Abigail Zwerner

The six-year-old student who shot his teacher in the US earlier this year, boasted about the incident saying "I shot [her] dead", unsealed court documents show.

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Texas woman seriously injured after hawk drops snake on her

BBC NewsA Texas woman was attacked by a hawk and a snake at the same time after the bird - which eats snakes - accidentally dropped the wriggling serpent on her.

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Facebook's spread not linked to psychological harm, study finds

There is no evidence the global spread of Facebook is linked to widespread psychological harm, an Oxford Internet Institute (OII) study suggests. The research looked at how wellbeing changed in 72 countries as use of the social media platform grew.

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The atomic bomb marker inside your body

Nuclear weapons tests in the mid-20th Century left a hidden legacy within our cells – along with most living things on Earth. This "bomb spike" has proven surprisingly useful to scientists, helping them crack police investigations and bust brain myths.

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Kazakhstan: A road trip through the nation's immense landscapes

Sipping black tea with milk from a blue-and-white piala ceramic bowl, I felt like a child again. We'd arrived at Saty, a small village in southern Kazakhstan, after driving all day from Almaty through an otherworldly terrain of wide steppe grasslands, narrow gorges and snow-capped mountains.

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New York City beach closed after woman suffers shark bite

New York City closed its popular Rockaway Beach on Tuesday after a 50-year-old woman was bitten by a shark Monday evening, officials said. The woman was swimming near Beach 59th Street when a shark bit her leg, New York City Parks officials said.

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Weight-loss drug reduces stroke and heart risk

The makers of Wegovy say it cuts risk of a cardiovascular event in overweight people with heart disease by a fifth. The injection is popular in places like the US and was approved for weight loss in the NHS in England in June.

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Mushroom poisoning deaths: Family lunch mystery grips Australia

Two Saturdays ago, five people sat down for a family meal in a tiny Australian town. Within a week, three would be dead, a fourth fighting for life, and the fifth under investigation for potentially poisoning her guests with wild mushrooms.

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Solar Panel Placement

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Investigating the 'spiritual healers' sexually abusing women

Spiritual healing, also known as "Quranic healing", is a popular practice in the Arab and Muslim world. It is mostly women who visit healers - believing that they can solve problems and cure illness by expelling evil spirits known as "jinn".

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Do people really swallow spiders in their sleep?

According to the rhyme and song, the unfortunate woman swallowed the arachnid to catch a fly she had previously eaten - followed by a number of other creatures in an attempt to solve the original issue. But... let's concentrate on the spider.

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Italian fugitive caught in Corfu thanks to photo celebrating football win

One of Italy's most dangerous fugitives has been caught in Corfu after a photo of him cheering on his football team gave away his whereabouts. Vincenzo La Porta, 60, is thought to have close ties to the Camorra organised crime gang in Naples.

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Uganda paternity testing causes huge controversy

With reports of a sharp increase in the number of men in Uganda seeking paternity tests, fears are growing it could break up families and leave children psychologically scarred.

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Voyager 2: Nasa fully back in contact with lost space probe

Nasa is back in full contact with its lost Voyager 2 probe months earlier than expected, the space agency said. In July a wrong command was sent to the spacecraft, sent to explore space in 1977, changing its position and severing contact.

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In Pictures: The protectors of a 7,000-year-old faith

Located 125km north-east of Erbil (the capital of Kurdistan, an autonomous region of northern Iraq), lies the hamlet-sized shrine complex of Lalish, the holiest site of Yazidism, an ancient religion with an estimated 700,000 followers worldwide.

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What is the best clothing to keep you cool?

As the world continues to grapple with extreme heatwaves, which are becoming ever more regular thanks to climate change, the clothing we wear is a vital component in how we stay cool. Researchers have found that by wearing appropriate clothes, it is possible to turn the air-conditioning up by 2C (3.

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Worldcoin suspended in Kenya as thousands queue for free money

The Kenyan government has ordered cryptocurrency project Worldcoin to stop signing up new users, citing data privacy concerns. Worldcoin, founded by US tech entrepreneur Sam Altman, offers free crypto tokens to people who agree to have their eyeballs scanned.

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AI could be used to assess breast cancer scans

Artificial intelligence can "safely" read breast cancer screening images, a Swedish study suggests. Researchers led by a team at Lund University found computer-aided detection could spot cancer at a "similar rate" to two radiologists.

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Uren vertraging, lege brandstoftank en het verkeerde adres: de helse tocht van chiro Wacko uit Anderlecht

De terugreis van chiro Wacko vanuit hun kamp in de provincie Luik naar Anderlecht heeft veel langer geduurd dan verwacht. Door allerlei problemen is een deel van de leden en leiders pas in het midden van de nacht thuis gekomen.

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Henrietta Lacks: Family of black woman whose cells were taken settle case

The family of a black woman whose cervical cells were harvested in 1951 without her knowledge and replicated infinitely ever since have reached a settlement with a biotech company.

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Voyager 2: Nasa loses contact with probe after sending wrong command

Nasa has lost contact with its Voyager 2 probe billions of miles away from Earth after sending it the wrong command, the space agency has revealed. Last month, the spacecraft - exploring the universe since 1977 - tilted its antenna to point two degrees away from Earth after the mistake was made.

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Lori Vallow: Cult mum who killed children sentenced to life in prison

An Idaho mother in a doomsday cult has been sentenced to life in prison for murdering her two youngest children and conspiring in the murder of her husband's former wife. Lori Vallow Daybell, 50, was found guilty of first-degree murder and multiple conspiracy charges in May.

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xkcd: Moon

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Afghanistan: Taliban burn ‘immoral’ musical instruments

The Taliban have burned musical instruments in Afghanistan, claiming music "causes moral corruption". Thousands of dollars worth of musical equipment went up in smoke on a bonfire on Saturday in western Herat province.

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Are luggage-free trips the future?

Far too many clothes will be packed, of course, followed by sunglasses and swimwear and sandals, last year's suntan lotion and a good book. A sweater or jacket will probably be thrown in too, just in case. Perhaps, some of us will reassess how much luggage we really need to take. Most will not.

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WeChat: Why does Elon Musk want X to emulate China's everything-app?

Earlier this week Elon Musk rebranded Twitter to X - another step in his plan to emulate Chinese mega app WeChat. Mr Musk has long said that he wants to transform his social media firm, which he bought last year for $44bn (£34.4bn), into a much larger platform.

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Tiger population growing in Himalayan kingdom Bhutan

Bhutan has reported a marked increase in its wild tiger population, according to the results of a new survey. The latest figures show the tiny Himalayan kingdom is now home to 131 tigers - up 27% from the last count, held in 2015.

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Taylor Swift Seattle concert generates seismic activity

Taylor Swift's concerts in the US city of Seattle generated seismic activity equivalent to a 2.3 magnitude earthquake, a seismologist has said. The data was recorded at Swift's sell-out Eras tour performances at Lumen Field on 22 and 23 July.

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The Poignancy of Old Pornography

There’s something especially poignant about pornography in which all the participants are long dead. We explore the history of 19th century pornography for its melancholy yet redemptive associations. If you like our films, take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://goo.gl/yYdqqw Join o

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xkcd: Daytime Firefly

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Was the Gravitational Wave Background Finally Discovered?!?

Learn More About Opera One: https://opr.as/Opera-browser-PBS-Space-Time PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to: http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime A few weeks ag

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Ancient 2,000-year-old Roman shipwreck found off coast of Italy

The wreckage of an ancient Roman ship from more than 2,000 years ago has been found off the coast of Italy. The cargo ship was found off the port of Civitavecchia, about 50 miles (80km) north-west of Rome.

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Melting Swiss glacier uncovers climber missing since 1986

Human remains found on a glacier close to Switzerland's famous Matterhorn have been confirmed to be the body of a German climber missing since 1986. The discovery is the latest in a number of long held secrets that the Alpine glaciers, now rapidly shrinking due to climate change, have revealed.

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Essex dachshund Twiglet returned after video of theft shared

Twiglet, a 16-month old dachshund, was snatched by a thief who smashed a patio door at a house in Catmere End, near Saffron Walden, at about 15:00 BST. Essex Police released camera footage of the dog squealing and struggling to get away from the intruder.

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Cornwall photographer catches 'once in a lifetime' kestrel picture

Andy Maher, from Hayle, told BBC Radio Cornwall he was out taking photos of birds in flight when he saw the kestrel hovering above him. He said the bird then dived towards him and swooped away at the last second.

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False claims of bogus heatwave spread online

False claims suggesting that the BBC has been misreporting temperatures in southern Europe have been spreading on social media.

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Elke Roex stopt als schepen in Anderlecht: 'Tijd voor iets anders'

Elke Roex (Vooruit) stopt na september als schepen in Anderlecht. Ze gaat voor het Neerhof werken, een educatieve boerderij van de Vlaamse Gemeenschapscommissie in Dilbeek, op de grens met Anderlecht. Ze wordt als schepen opgevolgd door Bieke Comer.

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Your brain doesn’t detect reality. It creates it. | Lisa Feldman Barrett

This interview is an episode from @The-Well , our publication about ideas that inspire a life well-lived, created with the @JohnTempletonFoundation. Subscribe to The Well on YouTube ► https://bit.ly/thewell-youtube Watch Lisa Feldman Barrett’s next interview ► https://youtu.be/0QfCvIJRtE0 Ou

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N Korea: Kim Jong Un shows latest missiles to Russia defence chief

Kim Jong Un showed off North Korea's latest weapons to Russia's defence chief Sergei Shoigu on Wednesday. Pyongyang invited the Russian delegation led by Mr Shoigu as well one from China.

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Singapore to execute first woman on drugs charge for the first time in 20 years

Singapore is scheduled to execute a woman for the first time in almost 20 years, human rights advocates say. Singaporean national Saridewi Djamani, 45, was found guilty of trafficking 30g (0.03oz) of heroin in 2018.

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Niger soldiers declare coup on national TV

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsSoldiers in the West African country of Niger have announced a coup on national TV.They said they had dissolved the constitution, suspended all institutions and closed the nation's borders.

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UFOs and aliens bring a divided US Congress together

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsIf the truth is out there, the US Congress wants to know.

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The UFO reports piquing Nasa's interest

It was just a normal day's flying for Alex Dietrich – until it wasn't. Streaking through the sky over the tranquil expanse of the Pacific Ocean near San Diego, the US Navy lieutenant commander was taking her F/A-18F Super Hornet fighter jet on a training mission with a colleague in another plane.

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Will the Gulf Stream really collapse by 2025?

The Gulf Stream system of warm ocean currents could collapse as early as 2025, a scientific study has warned. The end of the system, which drives the Atlantic's currents and determines western Europe's weather, would probably lead to lower temperatures and catastrophic climate impacts.

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Colonisation by British 'luckiest thing' to happen to Australia - John Howard

Colonisation was "the luckiest thing that happened" to Australia, the nation's second-longest serving Prime Minister John Howard has said. His remarks were made in relation to a historic referendum due to take place this year on Indigenous recognition.

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Brussels bombers found guilty after long murder trial

Image source, ReutersA court in Brussels has found six men guilty of terrorist murder, more than seven years after suicide bomb attacks killed 32 people at the city's airport and a metro station in March 2016.

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Is Musk right to ditch the Twitter logo?

When Jean-Pierre Dube saw the news that billionaire Elon Musk was scrapping Twitter's blue bird logo in favour of an Art Deco-style black and white X, the marketing professor thought it was a joke. Mr Musk's takeover of Twitter last year has been punishing for the social media platform.

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Paris to bring back swimming in Seine after 100 years

With a year to go to the Olympics, Paris is in the final phase of a historic clean-up which will soon see swimmers and divers back in the River Seine. Banned for a century because of the filthy water, city swimming is set to be one of the major legacies of the Games thanks to a €1.4bn (£1.

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Worldcoin: Sam Altman launches eyeball scanning crypto coin

Worldcoin gives people digital coins in exchange for a scan of their eyeballs. In sites around the world people queued to gaze into silver orbs on day one of the project's full launch.

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Can slow breathing guard against Alzheimer's?

Stop scrolling. Now inhale slowly, concentrating on expanding your lungs, to a count of five. Exhale, just as slowly and deliberately, as you count to five. You might find that, in just that 10 seconds, you suddenly feel just a little bit more relaxed or centred.

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Elke Roex (ex-politica): ‘Ik kies niet alleen een andere job, maar ook een ander leven'

In de zomer publiceert BRUZZ elke maandag een uitgebreid interview met een Brusselaar die professioneel of privé een boeiend jaar achter de rug heeft, en tijdens de zomer even de tijd neemt om te reflecteren.

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Why is technology not making us more productive?

We are often told that we are in the midst of a technological revolution. That business and the world of work continue to be transformed and improved by computers, the internet, the increased speed of communication, data processing, robotics, and now - artificial intelligence.

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Elon Musk: Twitter rebranded as X as blue bird logo killed off

Twitter has changed its brand and logo from its famous blue bird to "X". The new white X on a black background has replaced the blue bird on the desktop version of the social network, although is yet to appear on the mobile app.

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Intel's deepfake detector tested on real and fake videos

In March last year a video appeared to show President Volodymyr Zelensky telling the people of Ukraine to lay down their arms and surrender to Russia. It was a pretty obvious deepfake - a type of fake video that uses artificial intelligence to swap faces or create a digital version of someone.

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Does Antimatter Explain Why There's Something Rather Than Nothing?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to: http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE ↓ More info below ↓ Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Check out the Space Time Merch Store https://pbsspacetime.com/

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Seven AI companies agree to safeguards in the US

Seven leading companies in artificial intelligence have committed to managing risks posed by the tech, the White House has said. This will include testing the security of AI, and making the results of those tests public.

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AI will 'lead to more games being made and more jobs'

Artificial Intelligence will lead to more jobs in the video game industry, one of the bodies representing games developers has told the BBC. Dr Richard Wilson, boss of TIGA, says AI will "reduce the cost of making games and speed up the process".

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Can houseplants purify the air in your home?

Most people don't realise just how many pollutants are swirling around indoors, where they typically spend most of their time. For example, many of the products we use for cleaning and freshening our homes, schools and workplaces are adding invisible toxins to the air.

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Amsterdam bans cruise ships to limit visitors and curb pollution

Amsterdam's council has banned cruise ships from the city centre as the Dutch capital tries to limit visitor numbers and curb pollution. Politicians said the vessels were not in line with the city's sustainable ambitions.

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The Blue Flash: How a careless slip led to a fatal accident in the Manhattan Project

During World War Two, the US government formed the Manhattan Project, recruiting scientists and engineers from across the country to live and work at a secret research centre in Los Alamos, New Mexico.

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What If The Speed of Light is NOT CONSTANT?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to: http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime One of the most fundamental physics facts is that the speed of light in a vacuum is con

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Will workers be paid differently in the age of AI?

Artificial intelligence is already finding its way into daily workflows for many employees, and necessitating others to think about the AI skills they’ll need to keep their jobs secure when companies embrace the technology.

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Facebook-owner Meta exec Nick Clegg says AI 'quite stupid'

Current Artificial Intelligence (AI) models are "quite stupid", Facebook-owner Meta's president of global affairs Nick Clegg said as he played down the risks of the technology. The former UK deputy prime minister said the "hype has somewhat run ahead of the technology".

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Paris 2024 Olympics: Concern over French plan for AI surveillance

Abandoned luggage and unexpected crowds - real-time cameras will use artificial intelligence (AI) to detect suspicious activity on the streets of Paris during next summer's Olympics. But civil rights groups say the technology is a threat to civil liberties, as the BBC's Hugh Schofield reports.

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Kitchen shrine serpents and other fascinating new Pompeii discoveries

A kitchen shrine adorned with serpents, a bakery, human skeletons, exquisite frescos, and yes, a picture of something that looks very much like pizza. These are among the new finds being turned up at the Pompeii Archaeological Park.

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Why some celebrities are embracing Artificial Intelligence deepfakes

Singaporean actress, model and former radio DJ Jamie Yeo has no problem with being deepfaked. In fact, she signed up for it. She was speaking to the BBC the day after the release of the new series of Charlie Brooker's Netflix show.

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How AI is bringing film stars back from the dead

Most actors dream of building a career that will outlive them. Not many manage it – show business can be a tough place to find success. Those that do, though, can achieve a kind of immortality on the silver screen that allows their names to live on in lights.

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Geohydrotypography

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AI in dance music: What do DJs and producers think of it?

You're in a club, the music's pounding and the lights are flashing. You look up to the DJ booth but there's no-one there, because it's an AI-generated mix.

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How 2013 film The Congress predicted Hollywood's current AI crisis

With Hollywood all but shut down indefinitely due to strikes by the actors' union, SAG-AFTRA, and the Writers Guild of America, some powerful players have weighed in. George Clooney told CNN last week: "This is an inflection point in our industry".

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Drug donanemab seen as turning point in dementia fight

Results out today confirm that the drug donanemab, hailed as a turning point in the fight against Alzheimer's, slows cognitive decline by about a third. Mike Colley, who is 80, is one of only a few dozen patients in the UK to take part in the global trial, now published in the journal JAMA.

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Banksy: What it was like to work for anonymous superstar artist

For years, art fans and journalists have been trying to figure out the identity of the Bristolian renegade and global phenomenon that is the street artist Banksy.

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Manipur: The abandoned villages in the crosshairs of India violence

Ethnic violence has plunged Manipur, India's scenic state bordering Myanmar, into turmoil. Persistent clashes between the Meiteis and Kukis for over two months have left both feeling besieged. The neighbouring villages of these communities appear to be particularly susceptible to attacks.

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Twitter loses nearly half advertising revenue since Elon Musk takeover

Twitter has lost almost half of its advertising revenue since it was bought by Elon Musk for $44 billion (£33.6bn) last October, its owner has revealed. Mr Musk sacked about half of Twitter's 7,500 staff when he took over in 2022 in a effort to cut costs.

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Iran's morality police to resume headscarf patrols

Iranian police are resuming controversial patrols to ensure women obey dress codes and cover their hair in public, state media reports. The "morality police" will return to the streets to enforce Iran's hijab laws, a spokesman said on Sunday.

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Fireflies

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The Black Mirror plot about AI that worries actors

Hollywood actors are striking for the first time in 43 years, bringing the American movie and television business to a halt, partly over fears about the impact of artificial intelligence (AI).

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Chandrayaan-3: India set to launch historic Moon mission

India is set to launch its third Moon mission, aiming to be the first to land near its little-explored south pole. The Chandrayaan-3 craft with an orbiter, lander and a rover is due to lift off at 14:35 on Friday (09:05 GMT) from Sriharikota space centre.

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ChatGPT owner in probe over risks around false answers

US regulators are probing artificial intelligence company OpenAI over the risks to consumers from Chat GPT generating false information. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) sent a letter to the Microsoft-backed business requesting information on how it addresses risks to people's reputations.

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Who was the real Robert Oppenheimer?

It was the early hours of 16 July 1945, and Robert Oppenheimer was waiting in a control bunker for a moment that would change the world.

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Milan Kundera, author of The Unbearable Lightness of Being, dies aged 94

Milan Kundera, one of the biggest names in European literature in recent decades, has died in Paris aged 94. His best-known work was his 1984 novel The Unbearable Lightness of Being.

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India CEO criticised for picking AI bot over human staff

An Indian CEO is being criticised after he said that his firm had replaced 90% of its support staff with an artificial intelligence (AI) chatbot. Suumit Shah, founder of Dukaan, said on Twitter that the chatbot had drastically improved first response and resolution time of customers' queries.

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Birds get revenge by using anti-bird spikes in nests

In cities around the world, anti-bird spikes are used to protect statues and balconies from unwanted birds - but now, it appears the birds are getting their own back.

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Essex lorry deaths: Marius Draghici jailed for more than 12 years

A people trafficker has been jailed for 12 years and seven months over the deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants who died in a lorry container.Marius Draghici, 50, from Romania, admitted 39 counts of manslaughter and one count of conspiracy to assist unlawful immigration.

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How harvesting electricity from humid air could one day power our devices

No-one in the lab could quite believe what they were seeing. An experimental device, a humidity sensor, had started generating electrical signals. Fine, you might think – except that shouldn't have been possible.

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A simple guide to help you understand AI

And it tells you this is a car. It’s pretty clear what’s gone wrong.

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Putin meets Prigozhin: Getting to grips with latest twist in Wagner saga

Russian President Vladimir Putin met Yevgeny Prigozhin five days after the Wagner mercenary boss led a failed mutiny, the Kremlin has revealed. The BBC's Russia Editor gets to grips with the latest twist in the Wagner saga. So, let me get this straight.

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The troubling rise in congenital syphilis

Syphilis has been called many names since the first record of it in the 1490s, most of them uncomplimentary – "the French disease", "the Neapolitan disease", "the Polish disease". One however has stuck: "the great imitator".

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Work 'love bombing': When companies come on too strong

They check in several times a day: texts, emails, phone calls. They lavish flattery and compliments, make it clear you're the one. You only met each other a few days ago, but the hours since have been a whirlwind of attention and promises. There's a term for this kind of behaviour: 'love bombing'.

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Sri Lanka: The fate of a protest that toppled a president

Udeni Kaluthantri, a 54-year-old port worker, became an overnight sensation last year for reasons that had nothing to do with his job.

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Ukraine war: Twitter's paid-for Blue accounts fuel misinformation

False and misleading posts about the Ukraine conflict continue to go viral on major social media platforms, as Russia's invasion of the country extends beyond 500 days.

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Neutral Swiss and Austrians join Europe's Sky Shield defence

Switzerland and Austria have signed a declaration of intent to join the European air defence system Sky Shield. The system was initiated by Germany following Russia's invasion of Ukraine, and is designed to allow European countries to buy defence systems together, and train together.

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Netherlands to return treasures to Indonesia and Sri Lanka

The Netherlands is set to hand back hundreds of precious artefacts taken from Indonesia and Sri Lanka during its colonial period. Objects to be returned include a gem-encrusted bronze cannon and a looted cache of jewels from the "Lombok treasure".

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Threads could cause real problems for Twitter

First impressions of Threads: can Meta do this? Is this not somehow plagiarism? The app looks almost identical to Twitter. The character limit, the reposting, the feed. It's all incredibly familiar.

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Special Forces at centre of Afghanistan war crimes inquiry, MoD confirms

The Ministry of Defence has confirmed for the first time that UK Special Forces are at the centre of a war crimes inquiry. The MoD on Wednesday abandoned an effort to restrict any mention of Special Forces' involvement in the alleged war crimes in Afghanistan.

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E2E encryption: Should big tech be able to read people's messages?

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.

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Ocomtún: A long-lost Maya city that was just discovered

"You need to be a little crazy for this work," said Dr Ivan Šprajc, taking a drag of his cigarette and staring at me with ice-blue eyes. "You have to be careful about the snakes, insects, jaguars and everything else. But there is something pushing us.

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Facebook owner Meta to launch Twitter rival on Thursday

Facebook owner Meta is launching its new app to rival Twitter and says it will go live on Thursday. The app, which is called Threads and is available for pre-order on the Apple App Store, will be linked to Instagram.

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'I have been rejected by dozens of men over dowry'

Dowries have been illegal in India since 1961, but the bride's family is still expected to gift cash, clothes and jewellery to the groom's family.

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Actual Progress

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Why Saturn's moons have remained hidden from view

Ever since humanity began looking skywards, our Moon has stared back at us from its orbit a relatively short distance from our planet. It is the most visible of our Solar System's natural satellites, but it is by no means the only one.

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Thai elephant flown home after alleged abuse in Sri Lanka

The 29-year old Muthu Raja arrived in Thailand on Sunday on a 19 million baht (£425,000; $540,000) commercial reparation flight. Bangkok had demanded the return of the animal after claims it was tortured while kept at a Buddhist temple.

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ScholarAI | Home

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Euclid: Europe's 'dark explorer' telescope set for launch

By Jonathan AmosBBC Science Correspondent@BBCAmosA European space telescope is about to launch from Florida on a quest to resolve one of the biggest questions in science: what is the Universe made of?The Euclid mission will make an immense 3D map of the cosmos in an effort to tie down some of the pr

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Boost for Wagner as Mali shuns UN troops, but at what cost?

The outcome of Friday's UN Security Council vote on the future of the peacekeeping force in Mali is not in doubt: they have little choice but to terminate what has been the most deadly of all such UN operations around the world.

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Colosseum: Man who carved names on ancient Rome amphitheatre is UK tourist, Italian police say

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.A man filmed carving names into a wall at Rome's ancient Colosseum amphitheatre last week is a tourist who lives in the UK, Italian police say.

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What Titan sub wreckage can tell us about the tragedy

The recovery ship Horizon Arctic has now delivered all the debris it was able to collect from the shattered remains of the Titan submersible on the Atlantic seafloor. As shown by the amount of material that came ashore, the ship's deep-sea robot managed to bring up significant components.

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Sweden Quran burning sparks anger across Muslim world

Several Muslim-majority countries have condemned the burning of a copy of the Quran in Sweden at a protest. Salwan Momika, said to be an Iraqi living in Sweden, set fire to a copy of the Muslim text in front of Stockholm's central mosque on Wednesday.

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Quantum Galaxies: The Case for Axionic Dark Matter

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Quantum mechanics is our best theory of the fundamental nature of reality, but it's usua

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Sri Lanka: Five-day bank holiday for domestic debt restructuring

Sri Lanka began a five-day bank holiday from Thursday to allow the crisis-hit nation to restructure $42bn (£33.2bn) in domestic debt. This comes as it secured $700m in support from multinational lender the World Bank.

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What If Light Was Really Slow?

What does our world look like if the speed of light was really slow? The results are nothing short of crazy. Check out the playable version of the project here: https://lermand7.itch.io/openrelativity If you are feeling generous: https://www.patreon.com/worldsinmotion - - - - - - - - - - 📺 Ch

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Scientists pick up shock waves from colliding galaxies

Scientists have picked up shock waves from the orbit of supermassive black holes at the heart of distant galaxies as they begin to merge. This may be the first direct evidence of giant black holes distorting space and time as they spiral in on each other.

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Theyyam: The Indian trance where men become gods

I could hear the staccato drumming rising to a crescendo through the trees, suppressing the chirping of the dawn chorus of birds at 04:30. Descending the steps to the temple, I walked barefoot towards a small crowd of women dressed in their finest saris.

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Chess player Hans Niemann's $100m lawsuit over cheating claims dismissed

Image source, AFPBBC NewsA court in the US state of Missouri has dismissed a $100m (£78m) lawsuit filed by top chess player Hans Niemann over cheating allegations.

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8 Ursae Minoris b: Scientists unlock mystery of planet that escaped death

Scientists baffled by a mysterious planet that should have been destroyed believe they have discovered why it survived. The planet - 8 Ursae Minoris b - was identified in 2015 in the Milky Way.

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South Koreans become a year younger under new age-counting law

South Koreans have become a year or two younger as a new law aligns the nation's age-counting system with international standards. The law scraps a centuries-old system that deems South Koreans one year old at birth, counting time in the womb.

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Illegal trade in AI child sex abuse images exposed

Paedophiles are using artificial intelligence (AI) technology to create and sell life-like child sexual abuse material, the BBC has found. Some are accessing the images by paying subscriptions to accounts on mainstream content-sharing sites such as Patreon.

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Pompeii archaeologists discover 'pizza' painting

Archaeologists in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii have uncovered a painting which depicts what might be the precursor to the Italian pizza. The flatbread depicted in the 2,000-year-old fresco "may be a distant ancestor of the modern dish", Italy's culture ministry said.

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Spanish swimming pools in Catalonia told not to ban topless bathing

Activists in Catalonia are celebrating after the government of the Spanish region informed its town and city halls that they must allow women to go topless in public swimming pools. Going topless is enshrined under a 2020 Catalan equality law.

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Climate change: Deforestation surges despite pledges

An area of tropical forest the size of Switzerland was lost last year as tree losses surged, according to new research. It means that a political pledge to end deforestation made at COP26 by world leaders is well off track.

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Trump heard on CNN tape discussing secret documents

An audio recording in which Donald Trump appears to acknowledge keeping a classified document after leaving the White House has been obtained by US media. In the recording, the former president is heard riffling through papers and saying: "This is highly confidential".

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The biggest myths about emotions, debunked | Lisa Feldman Barrett

No, emotions don’t happen TO you. Here’s what happens instead. ❍ Subscribe to The Well on YouTube: https://bit.ly/welcometothewell ❍ Up next: What trauma does to your brain and body https://youtu.be/ZKa7V_mV8l8 With the growth of self-help books and the fight to destigmatize therapy, peop

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New images show Chinese spy balloons over Asia

New evidence of China's spy balloon programme - including flights over Japan and Taiwan - has been uncovered by BBC Panorama. Japan has confirmed balloons have flown over its territory and said it's prepared to shoot them down in future.

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The tech flaw that lets hackers control surveillance cameras

Chinese-made surveillance cameras are in British offices, high streets and even government buildings - and Panorama has investigated security flaws involving the two top brands. How easy is it to hack them and what does it mean for our security?

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Bioluminescent plankton: 'It's the northern lights of the ocean'

This was Emma Tumulty's response to seeing a magical natural phenomenon on the coasts of Wales after years of hoping. The light in question is an ethereal blue that flashes along the edge of a wave as is rolls in to shore.

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Intelligence report says US split on Covid-19 origins

US intelligence agencies have found no direct evidence that Covid-19 broke out from a Chinese laboratory, a declassified report has said. The Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) said both a natural and laboratory origin remain plausible scenarios.

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The human-chimp bond captured in an iconic photo

On 14 July 1960, 26-year-old Jane Goodall arrived by boat to the shores of Lake Tanganyika, Tanzania. Here, in what is now Gombe Stream National Park, her ground-breaking scientific research into chimpanzee behaviour began.

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Does Gravity Require Extra Dimensions?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to: http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE ↓ More info below ↓ It’s been 120 years since Henry Cavendish measured the gravitational constant with a pair of lead balls suspended by a wire. The fundamental nature of gravity

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Facial Recognition: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

John Oliver takes a look at facial recognition technology, how it’s used by private companies and law enforcement, and why it can be dangerous. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/

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Why REM sleep is your brain's superpower—and 3 ways to trigger more of it | Patrick McNamara

This interview is an episode from @The-Well, our publication about ideas that inspire a life well-lived, created with the @JohnTempletonFoundation. Subscribe to The Well on YouTube ► https://bit.ly/thewell-youtube Watch Patrick McNamara’s next interview ► https://youtu.be/GRPjIqxVUbo Neurosc

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Kids don’t always make you happier. Here’s why people have them anyway. | Paul Bloom

This interview is an episode from The Well, our new publication about ideas that inspire a life well-lived, created with the John Templeton Foundation. Subscribe to The Well on YouTube ► https://bit.ly/thewell-youtube Up Next ► Why you should want to suffer — just a little bit https://youtu.b

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Wagner chief vows to topple Russian military leaders

The head of Russia's Wagner mercenary group has vowed to "go all the way" to topple Russia's military leadership, hours after the Kremlin accused him of "armed rebellion". Yevgeny Prigozhin said his Wagner fighters had crossed the border from Ukraine into Russia, entering the city of Rostov-on-Don.

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Titanic director James Cameron accuses OceanGate of cutting corners

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Science Editor, BBC NewsHollywood film director James Cameron, who directed the 1997 movie Titanic, has told the BBC the team who built the submersible which imploded with the loss of five lives had "cut corners".

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Roseate House: India man 'cons' posh Delhi hotel for two-year free stay

Image source, Getty ImagesA man in India has allegedly managed to stay in a five-star hotel in the capital, Delhi, for close to two years without paying the bill.

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Maya civilisation: Archaeologists find ancient city in jungle

Archaeologists in Mexico have discovered the remains of an ancient Maya city deep in the jungle of the Yucatán Peninsula. Experts found several pyramid-like structures measuring more than 15m (50ft) in height.

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Why the waters around the Titanic are still treacherous

At some point in Autumn 1911, an enormous chunk of ice cleaved away from a glacier on the southwest of Greenland's vast ice sheet. Over the following months, it slowly drifted south, melting gradually as it was carried by the ocean currents and the wind.

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Titan sub: Cramped vessel is operated by video game controller

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsBefore the five-person crew of a missing submersible vessel began to descend to the ocean floor, they first had to be locked inside by a support crew who sealed it shut with bolts.

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Japan sterilisation law victims included nine-year-olds

Two nine-year-olds were among the 25,000 people forcibly sterilised in Japan under its post-World War Two eugenics law, a parliament report has revealed. The law, in place for 48 years, forced people to undergo operations to prevent them having children deemed "inferior".

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What did the Vikings eat?

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A daytime nap is good for the brain

Regularly finding time for a little snooze is good for our brain and helps keep it bigger for longer, say University College London researchers. The team showed nappers' brains were 15 cubic centimetres (0.9 cubic inches) larger - equivalent to delaying ageing by between three and six years.

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Titan sub implosion: What we know about catastrophic event

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.US authorities say a debris field located in the North Atlantic leads to a conclusion that OceanGate's Titan submersible suffered a "catastrophic implosion" (a violent collapse inwards), instantly killing all five passengers on board.

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Titanic tourist submersible goes missing with search under way

The Boston Coastguard told BBC News that a search and rescue operation was under way off the coast of Newfoundland. It is unclear how many people were on board when it went missing.

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Graf Spee: Nazi battleship's bronze eagle saved from smelter

The future of a bronze eagle which once adorned the Nazi battleship Admiral Graf Spee remains uncertain after plans to melt it down were scrapped. Treasure hunters raised the eagle in 2006 off the coast of Uruguay, where the Graf Spee had been scuttled in 1939 to stop it falling into enemy hands.

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Antidepressants: Two million taking them for five years or more

More than a quarter of patients on antidepressants in England - about two million people - have been taking them for five years, the BBC has found. This is despite there being limited evidence of the benefits of taking the drugs for that length of time.

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Deepfake porn documentary explores its 'life-shattering' impact

The director of a documentary about the impact of deepfake porn has said she hopes her film will help people understand the immeasurable trauma it causes.

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Dazzling ancient bronze sword found in Germany

German archaeologists are thrilled to have dug up a Bronze Age sword more than 3,000 years old which is extraordinarily well preserved. The bronze sword with an octagonal hilt was found in a grave in the southern town of Nördlingen. It is thought to be from the late 14th Century BC.

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The women baring all in Smoke Sauna Sisterhood film

Female friends have long gathered together to share life stories and laughs, but they generally keep their clothes on. In the documentary film Smoke Sauna Sisterhood, however, the women are naked.

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The Beatles' 'final' record: Should we bring singers back from the dead?

"I think we're actually on the cusp of something exhilarating and terrifying… it's an alien life form." When Bowie voiced these thoughts in a 1999 interview, he was greeting the creative dawn – or potential cataclysm – of the digital age.

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Richard Branson: Virgin Galactic commercial space flights to start this month

Sir Richard Branson's space tourism company Virgin Galactic says it will launch its first commercial flight before the end of this month. The firm is targeting a launch window for the flight, which is called Galactic 01, from 27 June to 30 June.

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The workers already replaced by artificial intelligence

Until recently Dean Meadowcroft was a copywriter in a small marketing department. His duties included writing press releases, social media posts and other content for his company.

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How the colour of your swimsuit can save your life

It is a beautiful evening in early summer, and instead of sitting on the patio, enjoying the sunshine, I am on my computer, scrolling through image after image of swimsuits for my toddler. The options seem endless. Ruffled and white with a pattern of blue seashells and a matching, wide-brimmed hat.

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Peru archaeology: Ancient mummy found under rubbish dump

Archaeologists in Peru conducting a dig at the site of a rubbish dump in the capital Lima have found a mummy they think is around 3,000 years old. Students from San Marcos University, who are helping with the dig, first spotted the mummy's hair and skull.

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First synthetic human embryo raises ethical issues

Scientists have created the first synthetic human embryos - using no eggs or sperm - provoking deep ethical questions, according to reports. The synthetic embryos - only days or weeks old - could help researchers study the earliest stages of human development and explain pregnancy loss.

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What Supernova Distance Would Trigger Mass Extinction?

Thank you to Brilliant for Supporting PBS. To learn more go to https://brilliant.org/SpaceTime/ PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbssp

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How a dose of MDMA transformed a white supremacist

In February 2020, Harriet de Wit, a professor of psychiatry and behavioural science at the University of Chicago, was running an experiment on whether the drug MDMA increased the pleasantness of social touch in healthy volunteers.

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Is the US trying to kill crypto?

Is the US out to kill crypto? Three years ago, the majority of the firms in the sector that Andrew Durgee's company invested in were based in the US.

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Harvard morgue manager charged with selling body parts

The manager of Harvard Medical School's morgue and three others have been charged with buying and selling stolen human remains. Cedric Lodge allegedly took "heads, brains, skin and bones" from cadavers donated to Harvard University's medical school and sold them online.

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North Korea: Residents tell BBC of neighbours starving to death

People in North Korea have told the BBC food is so scarce their neighbours have starved to death. Exclusive interviews gathered inside the world's most isolated state suggest the situation is the worst it has been since the 1990s, experts say.

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Super-engineered vaccines created to help end polio

Scientists have "super-engineered" polio vaccines to prevent them mutating into a dangerous form that can cause outbreaks and paralysis. The oral vaccines contain weakened live polio viruses and the genetic redesign locks them into that weakened state.

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Dylan Mulvaney: Bud Light loses top spot in US after boycott

Bud Light has lost its position as the best-selling beer in the US after facing a boycott, new figures show. In the four weeks to 3 June sales were down by almost a quarter, according to consulting firm Bump Williams.

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The ultimate insider view of The Beatles and Beatlemania

In the 60s, youth culture exploded, spawning pop music, short hemlines and screaming fans. One witness saw this exciting time closer up than almost anyone else. "Millions of eyes were suddenly upon us, creating a picture I will never forget for the rest of my life," he recalls.

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Finland's plan to bury spent nuclear fuel for 100,000 years

"Onkalo" is a Finnish word for a cave or a hollow. It implies something big and deep: you don't know where an onkalo ends or whether it ends at all. It's a fitting name for a huge grave made in Finland over the last 20 years.

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Discrimination bigger concern from AI than human extinction, says EU chief

Discrimination is a more pressing concern from advancing artificial intelligence than human extinction, says EU chief Margrethe Vestager. Ms Vestager told the BBC "guardrails" were needed to stop the technology's biggest risks from materialising.

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Southwark: Rare Roman mausoleum unearthed in London

The remains of the structure at the Liberty of Southwark site in Borough have been described as "extremely rare" and feature preserved floors and walls. Archaeologists think the site was used as some form of burial ground or tomb for wealthier members of Roman society.

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Sir Paul McCartney says artificial intelligence has enabled a 'final' Beatles song

Sir Paul McCartney says he has employed artificial intelligence to help create what he calls "the final Beatles record". He told BBC Radio 4's Today programme the technology had been used to "extricate" John Lennon's voice from an old demo so he could complete the song.

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Jack Dorsey: India threatened to shut Twitter and raid employees

Former Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey has alleged that the Indian government had threatened to shut the platform and raid employees' houses in the country.

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'Dead' woman found breathing in coffin at own funeral

Mourners at the funeral of an Ecuadorian woman were startled to discover she was still alive. Bella Montoya, 76, was declared dead last week following a suspected stroke.

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Five key challenges to make AI safe

Artificial-intelligence experts generally follow one of two schools of thought - it will either improve our lives enormously or destroy us all. And that is why this week's European Parliament debate on how the technology is regulated is so important.

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Amritsar: The Indian city where no one goes hungry

Amritsar, a north Indian city of two million people, is famous for many things: delectable cuisine, its historical old town and the spectacular Golden Temple – the most significant shrine of the Sikh religion.

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Stepping Through Film: Man trots globe blending scenes into film locations

An Essex photographer who turned a "passion project" into a full-time job that has taken him around the world said it had been a "truly amazing adventure".

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Belgium's Africa Museum rethinks its relationship with Congo

In the darkest corner of a grand museum that looks like a neo-classical palace lies a not-so-secret room. It is filled with statues of Congolese people, which have been regarded as racist, that were once part of the permanent exhibition.

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How many shipwrecks are there in the world's oceans?

When Elias Stadiatis descended into the indigo-blue water, he had a normal day of searching for sponges ahead of him. Weighed down in a copper diving suit, surrounded by a tangle of breathing tubes, Stadiatis eventually reached the seafloor.

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The Light: Inside the UK’s conspiracy theory newspaper that shares violence and hate

BBC disinformation and social media correspondentA UK conspiracy theory newspaper sharing calls for trials and executions of politicians and doctors has links with the British far-right and a German publication connected to a failed coup attempt, the BBC can reveal.

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The Black Hole That Kills Galaxies

Go ‘beyond the nutshell’ at https://brilliant.org/nutshell/ and dive deeper into these topics and more with a free 30-day trial! This video was sponsored by Brilliant. Thanks a lot for the support! The next Limited Edition Pin is here – it’s your very own Dyson Sphere! It’s available only

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Diego Garcia: The tropical island ‘hell’ for dozens of stranded migrants

Dozens of migrants have been stranded for months on a tiny British territory in the Indian Ocean after being rescued from their struggling fishing boat.

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Colombia plane crash: The clues that helped find the children

Four children have been found alive in Colombia's Amazon jungle more than a month after the plane they were travelling on crashed.

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Why is there taurine in energy drinks?

There's an elderly Scottie dog with a walking stick. Naturally, he is considering the skateboard in front of him – and beyond it, a skate ramp.

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Legendary Mozambican ruby sells for record price

The biggest ruby ever to come to auction has been sold in New York for a record sum of $34.8m (£28m). Sotheby's, which auctioned the 55.22-carat gem, described it as a "once-in-a-lifetime" jewel.

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Tiny 12,000-year-old bird bone flutes found in Israel

Tiny bones from prehistoric birds found at a birdwatching site in northern Israel have been identified as 12,000-year-old flutes, researchers say. Seven wing bones from coots and teals were found to have holes bored into them, which mimicked the sound of birds of prey when tested on replicas.

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Ukraine war: Oleg Orlov faces jail time for criticising Putin's war

As soon as he enters the courtroom, Oleg Orlov makes his feelings about this trial crystal clear. The veteran Russian human rights defender opens his briefcase and takes out a book. He holds it up to the TV cameras. The title is End of the Regime.

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What's in the Trump indictment: US nuclear secrets and files kept in shower

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC News, Washington DCFormer President Donald Trump has been charged with mishandling hundreds of classified documents, including about US nuclear secrets and military plans.

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The workers quitting digital nomadism

The digital nomad has become an iconic character of the modern remote-work era. The words often conjure the image of a professional writer or tech worker with a computer, meandering through the streets of a picturesque foreign city, or tapping away at a keyboard in a beachfront café.

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Canada wildfires: Will they change US climate attitudes?

In the 1500s, the artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder produced a painting about people's indifference to distant suffering. Called Landscape with the Fall of Icarus, a copy of the original that's now on display in Brussels shows a farmer ploughing his field in the foreground.

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He ran out of countries to visit, so he created his own

Editor’s Note: Sign up for Unlocking the World, CNN Travel’s weekly newsletter. Get news about destinations opening, inspiration for future adventures, plus the latest in aviation, food and drink, where to stay and other travel developments.

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Religious US broadcaster Pat Robertson dies at 93

Evangelical Christian leader Pat Robertson has died at the age of 93. He was one of the driving forces of a movement to increase the influence of the religious right in US politics.

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Children among several stabbed in Annecy attack

Several children have been stabbed in an attack in a park near Lake Annecy, in France's south-east, the interior minister says. Gerald Darmanin confirmed the perpetrator had been arrested by police.

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Unmasking the men who trade in subway train groping videos

Women who are groped on trains in East Asia face the further threat of their assault being filmed and uploaded for sale online. In a year-long investigation, the BBC World Service's investigative unit, BBC Eye, has gone undercover to unmask the men cashing in on sexual violence.

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Crocodile found to have made herself pregnant

The first case of a crocodile who made herself pregnant has been identified at a zoo in Costa Rica. She produced a foetus that was 99.9% genetically identical to herself.

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Vision Pro: BBC editor tries out Apple's $3,499 headset

The first thing you notice about Apple's Vision Pro headset is that it's fairly comfortable - as much as wearing a pair of giant ski goggles on your face can possibly be.

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No means no: Japan is set to redefine rape in landmark legal reform

Warning: this article contains details that some readers may find distressing. Days after their rape, Megumi Okano says, they already knew the attacker would get away scot-free.

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How to tip around the world

The ongoing debate about tipping culture in the United States has been reignited with the recent news that employees at the first-ever unionised Apple Store in the US are proposing asking for tips.

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'Ducking hell' to disappear from Apple autocorrect

Apple will improve its autocorrect feature so it stops changing one of the most common swear words to "ducking". Although iPhone users can disable the autocorrect, the keyboard's factory settings on the device change the word automatically.

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Robert Hanssen: The fake job that snared FBI agent who spied for Moscow

For nearly 20 years, FBI agent Robert Hanssen was leaking highly sensitive material to the Soviets. Then the US came up with an elaborate plan to stop him. In December 2000, FBI agent Richard Garcia had a curious visit from a colleague overseeing the Russia desk.

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The search for Earth's hidden mountains

It was a glaring summer's day in Antarctica. Through frozen eyelashes, Samantha Hansen blinked out at the featureless landscape: a wall of white, where up was the same as down, and ground blended seamlessly into sky.

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Jim Hines: First sprinter to run 100m in under 10 seconds dies

US sprinter Jim Hines, the first man to run the 100m in under 10 seconds, has died at the age of 76. He broke the record in 1968 when he recorded a hand-timed 9.9 seconds at the US Championships.

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Apple expected to launch mixed-reality headset at WWDC

All eyes are on Apple as it is expected to launch a mixed-reality headset at its annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC), in California. It would be the technology giant's most significant product release since it unveiled the Apple Watch, in 2015.

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France: Paris Champs-Élysées hosts mass spelling contest

Paris's most famous avenue was turned into an open-air classroom on Sunday, as almost 1,400 people took part into a record-breaking spelling exercise. About 1,700 desks were laid out on the Champs-Élysées for an event billed as the "largest dictation in the world".

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Can sci-fi films teach us anything about an AI threat?

In an apocalyptic warning this week, big-name researchers cited the plot of a major movie among a series of AI "disaster scenarios" they said could threaten humanity's existence.

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Utah primary schools ban Bible for 'vulgarity and violence'

BBC NewsA school district in the US state of Utah has removed the Bible from elementary and middle schools for containing "vulgarity and violence".The move follows a complaint from a parent that the King James Bible has material unsuitable for children.

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YouTube stops deleting false 2020 election claims

YouTube will stop removing videos with false claims of fraud in the 2020 presidential election, the social media platform announced on Friday. The move, ahead of the 2024 elections, is a reversal of its policy put in place after the 2020 vote.

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Eight ways to make your clothes last longer

Shelley Tobin, costume curator at the National Trust's Killerton House, near Exeter in the UK, is musing about what happens to waste materials in the fashion industry.

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What are the risks of being an older father?

Fathers, it seems, are getting older. In some cases, by quite a bit.  This week, representatives for the actor Al Pacino, aged 83, confirmed he is having a child with his girlfriend 29-year-old Noor Alfallah.

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Is 'Perpetual Motion' Possible with Superfluids?

Thank you to Brilliant for Supporting PBS. To learn more go to https://brilliant.org/SpaceTime/ PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbssp

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Lake Maggiore boat accident: Questions remain over spy deaths

The story of a boat that sank on Lake Maggiore on 28 May has elements of a spy novel. Four people tragically drowned on the picturesque and popular lake south of the Swiss Alps.

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Sanda Dia: Belgium reckons with verdict over black student's hazing death

The death of black Belgian student Sanda Dia shocked Dutch-speaking Flanders in 2018. Warning: Some readers may find some of the details in this article upsetting.

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US Air Force denies AI drone attacked operator in test

Technology editorA US Air Force colonel "mis-spoke" when describing an experiment in which an AI-enabled drone opted to attack its operator in order to complete its mission, the service has said.

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Multi-cancer blood test shows real promise in NHS study

The test correctly revealed two out of every three cancers among 5,000 people who had visited their GP with suspected symptoms, in England or Wales. In 85% of those positive cases, it also pinpointed the original site of cancer.

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Why cultivated meat is still so hard to find in restaurants

In summer 2013, a handful of people gathered in London in what looked like a TV set for a cookery show. A man in a white coat and chef's hat basted a burger. The camera filming him cut to a close-up as he spooned oil onto the minced patty.

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Can We Move PLANET EARTH Across the Universe?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Interstellar travel is horrible-what with the cramped quarters of your spaceship and onl

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Why Einstein is a “peerless genius” and Hawking is an “ordinary genius” | Albert-László Barabási

This interview is an episode from @The-Well, our publication about ideas that inspire a life well-lived, created with the @JohnTempletonFoundation. Subscribe to The Well on YouTube ► https://bit.ly/thewell-youtube Watch Albert-László Barabási’s next interview ► https://youtu.be/sVQKxX2c2G

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Elon Musk: Twitter boss reclaims title of world's richest person

Elon Musk has reclaimed his title as the world's richest person, knocking the boss of luxury goods giant LMVH, Bernard Arnault, off the top spot. His net worth has soared by $55.3bn (£44.44bn) since January to $192bn (£153.24bn), after a rise in the value of his electric car company Tesla.

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The five best places to eat Catalan food in Barcelona

The proud capital of Catalonia, Barcelona not only has own independent-minded identity and language, but also boasts its own unique cuisine.

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What did Stonehenge sound like?

These miniature standing stones aren't on public display, although they might help give the million annual visitors who come to the real site a better understanding of the imposing, lichen-covered stone structure built roughly 5,000 years ago.

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France influencers: Jail threat for those found flouting new ad laws

Influencers in France could now face jail time if they are found to have broken new promotion regulations, after legislation was formally adopted on Thursday. The tough new laws aim to protect consumers from misleading or fake commercial practices online.

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Andrew Tate BBC interview: Influencer challenged on misogyny and rape allegations

Andrew Tate has denied fuelling a culture of misogyny and defended his reputation in a combative interview with the BBC.

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The Truman Show: Has a film ever predicted the future so accurately?

"Good morning, and in case I don't see ya… good afternoon, good evening, and good night!" Truman Burbank (Jim Carrey) cheerfully calls out to his neighbour. It's as predictable as the sun rising and setting, a part of Truman's unchanging everyday routine.

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Fawlty Towers: Andrew Sachs talks about the Fawlty cast

If you have any favourite clips from the show, let us know and we'll upload them! All copyrights belong to the BBC.

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AI: War crimes evidence erased by social media platforms

Evidence of potential human rights abuses may be lost after being deleted by tech companies, the BBC has found. Platforms remove graphic videos, often using artificial intelligence - but footage that may help prosecutions can be taken down without being archived.

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Amazon to pay $30m over Alexa and Ring privacy violations

Amazon is to pay $25 million (£20 million) to settle allegations that it violated children's privacy rights with its Alexa voice assistant. The company agreed to pay the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) after it was accused of failing to delete Alexa recordings at the request of parents.

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How We Know The Universe is Ancient

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to: http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE ↓ More info below ↓ Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Check out the Space Time Merch Store https://pbsspacetime.com/

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UFOs: Five revelations from Nasa's public meeting

American authorities have examined around 800 mysterious reports of unidentified flying objects collected over decades - but only a small fraction are truly unexplained, a panel of researchers says.

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Every Canadian cigarette will soon carry a health warning

Canada will soon print warning labels directly on cigarettes in a world-first, the country's health agency announced. New packaging will feature a warning on each cigarette with phrases like: "Cigarettes cause cancer" and "Poison in every puff".

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French Open 2023: Novak Djokovic criticised for message about Kosovo after first-round win

Novak Djokovic's political message about Kosovo at the French Open was "not appropriate" and "shouldn't happen again", says France's sports minister. Amelie Oudea-Castera said there needs to be a "principle of neutrality for the field of play".

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James Webb telescope: Icy moon Enceladus spews massive water plume

Astronomers have detected a huge plume of water vapour spurting out into space from Enceladus, an icy moon of Saturn. The 504km-wide (313 miles) moon is well known for its geysers, but this is a particularly big one.

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Roald Dahl: The fierce debate over rewriting children's classics

Sir Salman Rushdie had his say. The UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak weighed in. The New York Times published a piece debating the pros and cons. Steven Spielberg offered his opinion. Even the Queen seemed to refer to it.

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AI 'godfather' Yoshua Bengio feels 'lost' over life's work

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Technology editorOne of the so-called "godfathers" of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has said he would have prioritised safety over usefulness had he realised the pace at which it would evolve.

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Manhattanhenge: How to see it this year

New Yorkers are gathering for the biannual spectacle of Manhattanhenge on Tuesday evening. The city's famous grid system will frame the setting sun, casting a warm glow over the concrete jungle.

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Shetland castle for sale for £30,000 but needs £12m upgrade

House-hunters could snap up Brough Lodge on the island of Fetlar for less than the price of a flat in Glasgow. The 200-year-old property is set in 40 acres of land, with folly towers, a courtyard and walled gardens.

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Ben Roberts-Smith: How war hero's defamation case has rocked Australia

For months on end, Australia's most-decorated living soldier sat stoically in a Sydney courtroom as dozens of witnesses accused him of war crimes, bullying peers, and assaulting his mistress. But Ben Roberts-Smith was not the one on trial.

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Artificial intelligence could lead to extinction, experts warn

Artificial intelligence could lead to the extinction of humanity, experts - including the heads of OpenAI and Google Deepmind - have warned. Dozens have supported a statement published on the webpage of the Centre for AI Safety.

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Kathleen Stock: Gender-critical academic 'determined' to do talk

BBC NewsA gender-critical academic says she is "determined" to speak at the Oxford Union after some students responded angrily to her invitation to a talk.There has been a row over whether Prof Kathleen Stock should be allowed to attend the debate.

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The cult of gender ideology is finally disintegrating

Susie Green, the former chief executive of Mermaids, who stood down “unexpectedly” last year, has been hiding in plain sight for so long that I sincerely hope we can see her clearly now.

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Malaysia detains Chinese ship suspected of looting British WW2 wrecks

Malaysia has detained a Chinese-registered vessel suspected of looting two British World War Two shipwrecks. The bulk carrier was seized on Sunday for anchoring illegally at the site in the South China Sea.

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Covid: Top Chinese scientist says don’t rule out lab leak

The possibility the Covid virus leaked from a laboratory should not be ruled out, a former top Chinese government scientist has told BBC News. As head of China's Centre for Disease Control (CDC), Prof George Gao played a key role in the pandemic response and efforts to trace its origins.

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The 'exploding' demand for giant heat pumps

There are 2.5 million litres of water in an Olympic-sized swimming pool. If for some reason you wanted to bring it from a pleasant 20C to boiling point, German firm MAN Energy Solutions (MAN ES) has a heat pump that could do it.

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The Overseas Highway: The US' 'floating' highway

Seagulls cried overhead as I glided across miles of glistening waters somewhere between the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. The sky melted into the teal sea, which turned turquoise as it shallowed into channels between the coral and limestone islands.

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Twitter pulls out of voluntary EU disinformation code

Twitter has pulled out of the European Union's voluntary code to fight disinformation, the EU has said. Thierry Breton, who is the EU's internal market commissioner, announced the news on Twitter - but warned the firm new laws would force compliance.

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Olivier Vandecasteele: Iran releases Belgian aid worker in prisoner swap

Iran has released Belgian aid worker Olivier Vandecasteele, as part of what Oman's government said was a prisoner swap between the two countries. Belgian Prime Minister Alexander de Croo said Mr Vandecasteele was on his way home "after 455 days in prison in Tehran in unbearable conditions".

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Neuralink: Elon Musk's brain chip firm says US approval won for human study

Elon Musk's brain-chip firm says it has received approval from the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) to conduct its first tests on humans. The billionaire's Neuralink implant company wants to help restore people's vision and mobility by connecting brains with computers.

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Venezuela: 'I'm paid to tweet state propaganda'

Rafael - not his real name - is a massive internet nerd. At 59 years old, he is active on all the main social media platforms, dabbles in cryptocurrencies and even calls himself an influencer. But that is not all he does online.

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Dad completes 1000 days of son's toy car photos

An Edinburgh dad has completed 1000 days of taking pictures of his son's toy cars. Ross Burns has taken pictures everyday of the miniature hot-wheels cars across different location in the UK.

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Nvidia: The chip maker that became an AI superpower

When ChatGPT went public last November, it sent a jolt well beyond the technology industry. From helping with speeches, to computer coding and cooking, all of a sudden, AI appeared real and useful.

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New superbug-killing antibiotic discovered using AI

Scientists have used artificial intelligence (AI) to discover a new antibiotic that can kill a deadly species of superbug. The AI helped narrow down thousands of potential chemicals to a handful that could be tested in the laboratory.

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Who is attracted to policing jobs? | Brian Klaas

Brian Klaas argues that the key to police reform is changing who wants to be a cop. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, Busting police brutality myth ► https://youtu.be/h4mw4v4vAH4 Watch the full New Zealand po

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Virgin Orbit: Branson's rocket firm permanently ceases operations

British billionaire Sir Richard Branson's rocket company Virgin Orbit has permanently ceased operations, just months after a major mission failure. The company sold its assets for $36m (£29m), just 1% of the $3.7bn valuation ahead of its Nasdaq debut last year.

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New York's skyscrapers are causing it to sink – what can be done about it?

On 27 September 1889, workers put the finishing touches to the Tower Building. It was an 11-storey building that, thanks to its steel skeleton structure, is thought of as New York City's first skyscraper.

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AI optimism: How embracing artificial intelligence is getting workers ahead

Some people find it hard not to panic when reading the latest iteration of the ‘AI is going to take your job’ headline – especially considering the rapid advancement of artificial intelligence tools in recent years.

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Exoplanet High-5

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Foresight: The mental talent that shaped the world

When humanity acquired the ability to imagine the future, it changed the trajectory of our species. But in the age of the Anthropocene, we need to harness this mental skill now more than ever, say the scientists Thomas Suddendorf, Jon Redshaw and Adam Bulley.

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The scientists coaxing back nature with sound

Beyond human hearing, a cacophony of natural clicks, whistles and hums pass all around us, linking billions of living beings in networks of sound. Mother whales whisper to their young so predators can't hear them. Bees emit unique buzzing signals to distinguish threats from specific predators.

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Can ‘enhanced rock weathering’ help combat climate change?

In a quarry surrounded by the din of heavy machinery Jim Mann crouches down and picks up a handful of tiny black rocks. He's holding pieces of basalt. It's a hard volcanic rock that is neither rare nor particularly remarkable.

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Jennifer Lawrence's secret filming in Afghanistan

Image source, Getty ImagesGender and identity correspondent"You only oppress women," the young woman says to the Taliban fighter. "I told you not to talk," he shouts back, "I will kill you right here!""Okay, kill me!" she replies, raising her voice to match his.

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Could LIGO Find MASSIVE Alien Spaceships?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Whenever we open a new window on the universe, we discover things that no one expected.

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Man scales BBC HQ and hits statue with hammer

A man has scaled the front of the BBC's HQ in London and has hit a controversial statue with a hammer in an apparent protest. There have been calls for Eric Gill's Prospero and Ariel statue to be removed because the sculptor recorded sexually abusing his daughters in his diaries.

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The Satanic Temple: Think you know about Satanists? Maybe you don't

This may be the world's largest ever gathering of Satanists - and it's about to begin at a Marriott hotel in downtown Boston. In a candle-lit room set aside for Satanic ceremonies, a neon sign welcomes you to The Little Black Chapel.

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Syria: Dismay and fear as Bashar al-Assad returns to Arab fold

President Bashar al-Assad strode into the Arab League summit in Jeddah, relishing the clearest recognition yet that he has won his war for Syria. He was embraced by the Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. A decade ago, the Saudis funded anti-Assad militias.

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Pale Male: Tributes pour in for celebrity red-tailed hawk

Tributes have poured in this week as New Yorkers say goodbye to Pale Male, a red-tailed hawk with a claim to being the city's original celebrity bird. The Central Park luminary was pronounced dead on Tuesday night, more than 30 years after he first settled in Manhattan's ritzy Fifth Avenue.

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The 5 core principles of life | Nobel Prize-winner Paul Nurse

Nobel Prize-winning scientist Paul Nurse defines the 5 core principles of life. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, You can slow down aging with zero weird tricks ► https://youtu.be/J_k95GvsOOM What is the es

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Oldest most complete Hebrew Bible sells for $38m at auction

The oldest most complete Hebrew Bible has been bought at Sotheby's New York for $38.1m (£30.6m), becoming the most valuable manuscript sold at auction. The Codex Sassoon is thought to have been written about 1,100 years ago.

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Woodward and Bernstein: Watergate reporters warn of the limitations of AI

US reporter Carl Bernstein has warned that artificial intelligence (AI) is a "huge force" which poses challenges for the future of journalism. Bernstein and his colleague Bob Woodward were the reporters at the heart of the Watergate scandal and the fall of President Nixon in 1972.

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Noise Filter

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Workplace AI: How artificial intelligence will transform the workday

Artificial intelligence has been around for years, but scarcely has it found itself in conversation as much as it has now.

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Elon Musk: I will say what I want even if it costs me

Twitter owner Elon Musk has defended his controversial social-media presence, saying he will "say what I want" even if it loses him money. Mr Musk was responding to accusations of antisemitism on Twitter, after his tweet George Soros "hates humanity" was criticised by the Israeli government.

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Global warming set to break key 1.5C limit for first time

Our overheating world is likely to break a key temperature limit for the first time over the next few years, scientists predict. Researchers say there's now a 66% chance we will pass the 1.5C global warming threshold between now and 2027.

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Titanic: First ever full-sized scans reveal wreck as never seen before

The world's most famous shipwreck has been revealed as never seen before. The first full-sized digital scan of the Titanic, which lies 3,800m (12,500ft) down in the Atlantic, has been created using deep-sea mapping.

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Albanian prisoners paid by UK government to return home

Albanian authorities have confirmed that most of its citizens forcibly sent back home from the UK this year were convicted of crimes there. The BBC has spoken to those men sent home, and learnt that some prisoners were offered £1,500 to leave - and some plan to come back.

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Marketing to Doctors: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Pharmaceutical companies spend billions of dollars marketing drugs to doctors. We have a few issues with that. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week

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Squaring Primes - Numberphile

Matt Parker is squaring primes. The Great Courses Plus free trial: http://ow.ly/JE3G30hIvoE (episode sponsor) More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ More Matt Parker on Numberphile: http://bit.ly/Matt_Videos Matt's book on Amazon... US: http://bit.ly/Matt_4D_US UK: http://bit.ly/Ma

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How to Fill a Klein Bottle - Numberphile

In a 3D world, it's possible to fill 4D Klein Bottles - featuring Cliff Stoll. More Cliff videos: http://bit.ly/Cliff_Videos More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ More Klein Bottle videos: http://bit.ly/KleinBottles You can buy a bottle from Cliff: https://www.kleinbottle.com Se

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French Resistance man breaks silence over German prisoners executed in 1944

Excavation work is to start soon to find the bodies of up to 40 German soldiers who were executed by the French Resistance in June 1944.

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Salman Rushdie warns free expression is under threat

Nine months after he was was stabbed on stage, acclaimed author Salman Rushdie in a rare public address has warned that freedom of expression in the West is under threat.

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ExxonMobil settles decades-old torture case with Indonesian villagers

Eleven Indonesian villagers from Aceh province have reached a confidential financial settlement with oil giant ExxonMobil. The villagers have been at the centre of a two-decade long legal battle over alleged human rights abuses.

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What will replace the International Space Station?

The space station is dead. Long live the space station. In eight years, the International Space Station (ISS) – a bastion of global collaboration and human ability – will end. But that dramatic finale doesn't need to be a sombre occasion.

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Kenya cult: Children targeted to die first, pastor says

Children were targeted as the first to be starved to death in the final days of a Christian doomsday cult in Kenya, according to fresh accounts emerging. Police investigating an apparent mass suicide have so far exhumed 201 bodies in a forest in the nation's southeast.

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Woman, 99, realises dream of facing circus knife thrower

Annie Duplock, from Sharnford, Leicestershire, stepped into the ring to brave the blades before a cheering crowd in Coventry on Friday. The former circus worker, who celebrates her centenary in three months, was part of the grand finale of the Zippo Circus show.

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AI creator on the risks, opportunities and how it may make humans 'boring'

Presenter, Sunday with Laura Kuenssberg"Humans are a bit boring - it will be like, goodbye!" That's the personal prediction - that artificial intelligence (AI) will supplant humans in many roles - from one of the most important people you've probably never heard of.

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How the 'naked' look took over fashion

No musician harnesses the power of an image quite like Beyoncé, so when she kicked off her Renaissance world tour this week, the costumes were as highly anticipated as the set-list.

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New York City's eight best literary venues

New York City has been the US' undisputed literary capital since the days when Herman Melville and Edith Wharton were scribbling away. In the generations since, the city has steadily lured wordsmiths from around the world seeking inspiration amid the city's "high growths of iron...

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Understanding One of Physics' Most Challenging Topics!

Check Out Changing Planet: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ut0Qdvnsd_s&ab_channel=PBS Comment Repsonse Live Stream with Matt: https://www.youtube.com/live/HmOQrEdhsuI?feature=share Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime If I roll a pair of

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Lori Vallow: US doomsday cult mother convicted of triple murder

An Idaho mother in a doomsday cult has been found guilty of murdering her two children and her husband's former wife, in a case that shocked the US. Lori Vallow and her husband, Chad Daybell, were charged with murder, conspiracy and grand theft in the killings.

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xkcd: Siphon

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Pope Francis warns pets must not replace children in Italy

Starting a family in Italy is becoming a "titanic effort" that only the rich can afford, Pope Francis has warned. Addressing a conference on Italy's demographic crisis, he said pets were replacing children in many households.

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How modern singing was invented

There was hysteria in the air at 81st Street Theatre in New York. Deep within the building, behind its white neoclassical arches and away from the steady chatter of crowds of adoring fans outside, a new kind of celebrity singer was walking onto a black-and-silver stage.

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New York City passes law barring weight discrimination

New York City has passed a bill outlawing discrimination based on weight, joining a growing movement in the US to make size a protected trait on par with race and gender. More than 40% of American adults are considered obese and studies show weight stigma is pervasive.

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How genetics determine our life choices

In the subterranean depths of a granite building on the outskirts of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík, a robot is slowly and methodically shuffling the chilled blood of tens of thousands of people from all over the world. Down in this concrete chamber, a well-honed process is taking place.

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Kambo: Australia investigates suspected frog mucus deaths

For the past two weeks, a small courthouse tucked away in a lush corner of eastern Australia has heard confronting and unusual evidence about the sudden deaths of two locals.

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More diverse gene map could lead to better treatments

Scientists have produced an updated map of all human DNA which could help to transform medical research. The original human genome, published 20 years ago, is mostly from one person, and does not represent human diversity.

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Will we ever...hibernate in space?

The year is 2039, and you're an astronaut on your way to Mars. You're only three months into the eight-month-long journey, and already your body is facing an onslaught of radiation from outer space. In zero gravity, your bones and muscles are at risk of wasting away.

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Baby born from three people's DNA in UK first

Most of their DNA comes from their two parents and around 0.1% from a third, donor woman. The pioneering technique is an attempt to prevent children being born with devastating mitochondrial diseases.

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E Jean Carroll: Jury finds Trump sexually abused writer in NY department store

BBC News, New YorkA jury in a civil lawsuit has found former President Donald Trump sexually abused a magazine columnist in a New York department store in the 1990s.But Mr Trump was found not liable for raping E Jean Carroll in the dressing room of Bergdorf Goodman.

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Louisiana girl shot in head while playing hide-and-seek

The 14-year-old was taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries after she was shot in the back of the head in rural Louisiana, police said. David Doyle, 58, is charged with aggravated assault and battery. He told officers he opened fire after seeing "shadows outside his home".

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Your Body Killed Cancer 5 Minutes Ago

Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources-cancervsimmune/ This video was partially financed by Gates Ventures. If you want to support this channel and get something nice in return check out our shop: https://kgs.link/shop-176 Somewhere in your body, your immune system just q

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Tom Hanks' debut novel lifts lid on movie industry, and his on-set behaviour

Tom Hanks says he has written his first novel as a "release from the never-ending pressure" of making movies. The two-time Oscar winner is publishing The Making of Another Major Motion Picture Masterpiece, inspired by his own screen career.

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Apple co-founder says AI may make scams harder to spot

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has warned that artificial intelligence (AI) could make scams and misinformation harder to spot. Mr Wozniak says he fears the technology will be harnessed by "bad actors".

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Iran executes two men convicted of blasphemy

Iran has executed two men who were convicted of "burning the Quran" and "insulting the Prophet of Islam", the country's judiciary says.

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St Kitts and Nevis is not totally free under King Charles III, says PM

The Prime Minister of a Caribbean nation has told the BBC his country is "not totally free" as long as King Charles III remains head of state. Dr Terrance Drew said that a public consultation on whether St Kitts and Nevis should become a republic would begin during his leadership.

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The crazy plan to explode a nuclear bomb on the Moon

The moment astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped out on to the Moon's surface in 1969 is one of the most memorable moments in history. But what if the Moon Armstrong stepped onto was scarred by huge craters and poisoned from the effects of nuclear bombardment?

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The jobs AI won't take yet

Since the start of the industrial revolution, there have been threats that new machines – from mechanised looms to microchips – would usurp human jobs. For the most part, the humans have prevailed.

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Police arrest man for opening store selling hard drugs in Canada

BBC News, TorontoA Canadian man has been arrested in British Columbia for opening a mobile shop to sell cocaine, heroin and other hard drugs.Jerry Martin, 51, has said he plans to challenge his arrest in court, arguing contaminated drug supplies cause harm.

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Covid global health emergency is over, WHO says

The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared that Covid-19 no longer represents a "global health emergency". The statement represents a major step towards ending the pandemic and comes three years after it first declared its highest level of alert over the virus.

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What a 1.5C lifestyle actually looks like

As 2020 drew to a close, Carys Mainprize set herself a challenge for the approaching year: to spend the next 12 months living on two tonnes of carbon: an amount equivalent to around half the average yearly emissions of a petrol car in the US. It was not an easy challenge.

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Coronation of King Charles III: Are you related to a King

Joy Ibsen, a retired Canadian journalist, had been an avid amateur geneaologist. Using digital census records, birth certificates and marriage documents, she painstakingly traced her family's ancestry back to the 14th Century.

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TikTok tracked UK journalist via her cat's account

Two days before Christmas, TikTok called London-based journalist Cristina Criddle to tell her two of its employees in China, and two in the US, had viewed user data from her personal account without her knowledge or consent.

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White House: Big Tech bosses told to protect public from AI risks

Tech bosses were summoned to the White House on Thursday and told they must protect the public from the dangers of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Sundar Pichai of Google, Satya Nadella of Microsoft, and OpenAI's Sam Altmann were told they had a "moral" duty to safeguard society.

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Why teaching robots to blink is hard but important

It's my first time drumming along with a robot. I'm sitting across a table from an adorable humanoid robot called the iCub. We each have our own stick and box, and are meant to strike the box with the stick in sync with a light pattern.

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Meteosat-12: Europe's new weather satellite takes first photos

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.By Jonathan AmosBBC Science Correspondent@BBCAmosThe first images from Europe's new weather satellite, Meteosat-12, have just been released.

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Can Morocco solve Europe’s energy crisis?

Morocco has big ambitions to export electricity produced by solar and wind farms to Europe, but should it be prioritising such renewable energy for its home market? Mr Zniber is a passionate man who senses opportunity out of crisis.

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US drug regulator approves world's first RSV vaccine

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved a vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) - an illness that kills thousands of Americans each year. The vaccine still needs approval from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention before it can be rolled out to the public.

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New Alzheimer's drug slows disease by a third

We could be entering the era of Alzheimer's treatments, after the second drug in under a year has been shown to slow the disease. Experts said we were now "on the cusp" of drugs being available, something that had recently seemed "impossible".

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Kremlin drone attack: Russia accuses Ukraine of trying to assassinate Putin

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Russia says it downed two drones that targeted the Kremlin in Moscow last night and accused Ukraine of attempting to kill President Vladimir Putin.

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Missing Australian fisherman's body found in crocodile

The body of an Australian man who vanished while fishing with friends has been found inside a crocodile. Kevin Darmody was last seen at Kennedy's Bend - well-known saltwater crocodile habitat in a remote part of northern Queensland - on Saturday.

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The Invisible Barrier Keeping Two Worlds Apart

In between two of the islands of Indonesia, there’s an ancient line that is both real and…not real. ***** PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to http://to.pbs.org/DonateEons ***** Produced by Complexly for PBS Digital Studios Super special thanks t

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AI: Which jobs are most at risk from the technology?

As the man widely seen as the godfather of artificial intelligence (AI) warns about growing dangers from how it is developing, businesses are scrambling to see how they can use the technology to their advantage.

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Fang Bin: China Covid whistleblower returns home to Wuhan after jail

Fang Bin, who documented the initial Covid outbreak in the Chinese city of Wuhan, has been freed from jail after three years, sources told the BBC. Mr Fang is one of several so-called citizen journalists who disappeared after sharing videos of scenes in Wuhan, the epicentre of the pandemic.

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AI 'godfather' Geoffrey Hinton warns of dangers as he quits Google

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsA man widely seen as the godfather of artificial intelligence (AI) has quit his job, warning about the growing dangers from developments in the field.

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Bill C-11: Why is YouTube mad at Canada?

BBC News, TorontoA new law that seeks to give Canadian artists a leg up online has left many influencers and tech giants alike seeing red.They took out subway ads, they posted TikToks, but in the end, the score was Silicon Valley-0, Ottawa-1.

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Maurizio Cattelan: Banana artwork eaten by Seoul museum visitor

Image source, Getty ImagesBBC News A South Korean art student ate a banana that was part of an installation by artist Maurizio Cattelan, saying he was "hungry" after skipping breakfast.

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Most populous nation: Should India rejoice or panic?

India's population has reached 1,425,775,850 people, surpassing the number of people in mainland China, according to the UN's estimates. India's decennial census - scheduled to be held in 2021 - has been delayed, so there's no official population data.

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The puzzle of Neanderthal aesthetics

Sometime between 135,000-50,000 years ago, hands slick with animal blood carried more than 35 huge horned heads into a small, dark, winding cave.

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When Physicists Try To Shoot a Monkey

Checkout our sponsor, Betterhelp, for 10% off your first month: https://www.betterhelp.com/actionlab Shop the Action Lab Science Gear here: https://theactionlab.com/ Checkout my experiment book: https://amzn.to/2Wf07x1 Twitter: https://twitter.com/theactionlabman Facebook: https://www.facebook.c

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Portugal: Four dead after suspected pigeon racer dispute

A man reportedly shot dead three men in Portugal before killing himself in what has been described as a feud related to the breeding of racing pigeons.The shooting took place in the city of Setubal, around 50 km (30 miles) south of the capital, Lisbon.

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Thailand: Southeast Asia's 'weed wonderland'

A new symbol has appeared in the kaleidoscopic jumble of neon signs that light up Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok's most international street.

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Sperm donor who fathered 550 children ordered to stop

The man named Jonathan, aged 41, could be fined more than €100,000 (£88,000) if he tries to donate again. He was banned from donating to fertility clinics in the Netherlands in 2017 after it emerged he had fathered more than 100 children.

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Wikipedia will not perform Online Safety Bill age checks

Wikipedia will not comply with any age checks required under the Online Safety Bill, its foundation says. Rebecca MacKinnon, of the Wikimedia Foundation, which supports the website, says it would "violate our commitment to collect minimal data about readers and contributors".

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Glass or plastic: which is better for the environment?

Dating back to between 325 and 350 AD, the Speyer wine bottle is thought to be the world's oldest bottle of wine. Now held in the Wine Museum in the German city of Speyer, where it was rediscovered in 1867, an analysis of its contents revealed that it holds an ethanol-based liquid.

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The Israeli plan to fit a fusion reactor into a container

From the outside it looks like an ordinary warehouse. But inside this unassuming building, in Hod Hasharon central Israel, is one of the most ambitious energy projects in the Middle East,

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Kenya cult deaths: Pastor Ezekiel Odero arrested in funeral home probe

Kenyan police have arrested a popular televangelist and closed his church on the country's Indian Ocean coast following reports of mass deaths. The move comes as investigations go on into a religious cult linked to the deaths of nearly 100 people.

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Gough Island: Worker sought for one of world's remotest places

Gough Island, a British territory in the southern Atlantic Ocean, has no permanent population. It is around 1,500 miles from the African mainland - and, with no airport, reaching Gough involves a seven-day boat ride from South Africa.

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Researchers identify three Roman camps in Arabia

Archaeologists have identified three undiscovered Roman fortified camps across northern Arabia. The University of Oxford school of archaeology made the discovery in a remote sensing survey, using satellite imagery.

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Governors Island: The uninhabited isle that birthed NYC

There's a moment setting out on the ferry from Manhattan's South Street to Governors Island that the receding skyline is all-consuming. Towering skyscrapers of glass, steel and concrete loom above the slate-coloured harbour.

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Trinity College's Berkeley Library to be renamed over slavery links

Ireland's oldest university has decided that its library will no longer be called after the philosopher George Berkeley, due to his links to slavery. Trinity College Dublin (TCD) has said it will "dename" the Berkeley Library as it has "been judged inconsistent with the university's core values".

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AI creators must study consciousness, experts warn

An open letter signed by dozens of academics from around the world calls on artificial-intelligence developers to learn more about consciousness, as AI systems become more advanced. Most experts agree AI is nowhere near this level of sophistication.

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Kenji Nagai: Missing camera reveals journalist's last moments in Myanmar

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.South East Asia correspondentIt is an image etched in Myanmar's collective memory of repression and loss.

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Steve Shanks: London Marathon runner dies on way home from race

Organisers of the event said Steve Shanks, 45, from Bingham, Nottinghamshire, died suddenly while travelling home on Sunday. Tributes have been paid to the experienced runner, whose cause of death has not yet been shared.

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The people replicating Moon dust

Even with the walls of a volcanic crater looming behind the white-washed single-storey buildings, it would be easy to miss the sleepy town of Tao. It only takes a few moments to pass through it as you drive along the LZ-20 highway that cuts across the middle of Lanzarote, in the Canary Islands.

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Roger Penrose explains Godel's incompleteness theorem in 3 minutes

good explanation from his interview with joe rogan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEw0ePZUMHA

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Taliban kills IS leader behind Kabul airport bombing

The Islamic State leader believed to have been responsible for the 2021 bombing at Kabul's airport has been killed by the Taliban, US officials have said. The August 2021 bombing killed 170 civilians and 13 US troops as people were trying to flee Taliban-controlled Afghanistan.

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How Tucker Carlson rode a wave of populist outrage

Last Wednesday night, Tucker Carlson opened his Fox News show in typical fashion. "Sometimes you wonder how filthy and dishonest our news media are," he mused.

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iSpace: First private moon landing likely to have failed

Image source, Getty ImagesBBC NewsA Japanese company hoping to make history by carrying out the first private Moon landing says its mission is likely to have failed. Communication was lost with the Hakuto-R lunar lander moments before it was due to touch down.

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Tangaraju Suppiah: Singapore to execute man over cannabis charge

Singapore is set to hang a man for trafficking cannabis, in the city-state's latest controversial execution. Activists say Tangaraju Suppiah was convicted on weak evidence. Authorities say he received due process, and have scheduled his execution for Wednesday.

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Recipe Relativity

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Recent, rapid ocean warming ahead of El Niño alarms scientists

This month, the global sea surface hit a new record high temperature. It has never warmed this much, this quickly. Scientists don't fully understand why this has happened.

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Kenya cult deaths: The unbearable stench of mass graves

In the middle of a forest about 65km (40 miles) from Kenya's coast, piles of fresh earth topped with crucifixes await the attention of forensic experts. About 14 mass graves have so far been dug up and Hussein Khalid has spent the past four days watching people exhume dozens of bodies.

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First edition Shakespeare text from 1623 goes on display

Guildhall library will be showcasing the rare book as part of a celebration of 400 years since the playwright's birth. Published just seven years after the Bard's death, the book contains all of his plays.

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Primo de Rivera: Spain to exhume fascist Falange leader

Spain is poised to exhume the remains of a fascist leader who was a pillar of support for the Franco dictatorship. José Antonio Primo de Rivera founded the Falange movement and his remains lie at a giant mausoleum created by the former fascist regime outside Madrid.

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Guy Ritchie's The Covenant and why Hollywood is afraid of the war in Afghanistan

Guy Ritchie's The Covenant is an intense action movie, full of gunfire and explosions that make you feel caught in the midst of danger. And like so many war films it relies on a slender plot about heroic choices.

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The nightmares that paralyse you in your sleep - BBC Future

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ChatGPT: How generative AI could change hiring as we know it

Since November 2022, AI chatbot ChatGPT has enabled anyone with internet access to generate anything in the written form: think intricate essays and code, succinct memos or poetry.

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Titanic plan from sinking inquiry sells for £195k

Medals awarded to telegraphist Harrold Cottam, who helped save 700 passengers on the Titanic, were also sold at the auction in Wiltshire on Saturday. Auctioneer Andrew Aldridge said he was "delighted" at the £395,000 total reached for the four Titanic lots.

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Kenya cult deaths: 21 bodies found in investigation into 'starvation cult'

Kenyan police have exhumed 21 bodies near the coastal town of Malindi, as they investigate a preacher said to have told followers to starve to death. Dead children were among those exhumed, and police said they expected to find even more bodies.

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From Akhenaten To Vlad The Impaler, Artist Brings Famous Historical Figures To Life

Time travel might not exist, but artworks throughout the ages give us glimpses of the past. Paintings and sculptures outlive their subjects, and we in the 21st century can sort of see the famous faces of Julius Caesar and Cleopatra.

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Is time up for Twitter?

It is almost a year to the day since Elon Musk announced that he wanted to buy Twitter. It was my first day in this job, and it was not exactly a quiet start.

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Most of you are NOT a science expert - Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, Matt Dillahunty

Most of you are not a science expert - Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, Matt Dillahunty #samharris #richarddawkins #science #mattdillahunty Full discussion here: https://youtu.be/fzKMhLcnJrw Pangburn Philosophy - A Celebration of Science & Reason LONDON with Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins & Matt Dillah

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Ralph Yarl, Kaylin Gillis and other senseless shootings rattle US

Ringing the wrong doorbell. Driving up the wrong road.

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Cocaine-smuggling submarine reveals Europe's drug crisis

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC News Europe correspondentI'm about to climb into the first "narco-sub" known to have brought cocaine from South America to Europe. It's 20 metres (65 ft) long, built out of fibreglass and - remarkably - homemade.

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NEW DISCOVERY About Supermassive Black Holes Explained!

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Astrophysicists have discovered a black hole that for millions of years has been blastin

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China: Dalai Lama furore reignites Tibet 'slave' controversy

An online backlash to the Dalai Lama has rejuvenated a long-running controversy over Tibetan history and boosted a Chinese government narrative. The Tibetan Buddhist leader has faced widespread criticism after a video surfaced showing him kissing a young boy and asking him to suck his tongue.

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I Made a Real-Life Invisibility Cloak! Watch My Hand Disappear With My Homemade Rochester Cloak!

In this video I show you a real-life invisibility cloak also called a Rochester Cloak. This device uses four lenses to curve light around an object in order to make it appear invisible! This is amazing! WARNING: This video is for entertainment purposes only. If you use the information from this vid

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Escape Speed

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Ricky Gervais on Religion for 10 minutes straight

Ricky Gervais on Religion for 10 minutes straight. ENJOY! Ricky Gervais is known for being an atheist and it is no secret that he is not a fan of god or religion, which he expressed on several different platforms like The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, in conversation with Richard Dawkins, His sta

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Anurag Maloo: Indian climber who fell in Nepal crevasse found alive

An Indian climber who went missing after falling into a crevasse on Mount Annapurna in Nepal has been found alive. Anurag Maloo, who went missing on Monday, was found in a critical condition by rescuers.

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Michael Schumacher: Seven-time F1 champion's family plan legal action after AI-generated 'interview'

Michael Schumacher's family are planning legal action against a magazine which published an artificial intelligence-generated 'interview' with the former Formula 1 driver.

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India to overtake China as most populous country

India is set to overtake China to become the most populous country in the world, data released by the United Nations shows. India's population is pegged at 1,428.6 million against China's 1,425.7 million by the middle of the year.

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What Americans can learn from Denmark on handling debt ceiling crisis

The high-wire drama of raising the US debt ceiling is making headlines again. Is there a better way? Perhaps Denmark has the answer. The US Congress is once more arguing about the country's debt ceiling - the limit on how much the government can borrow.

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Elliptical Pool Table - Numberphile

A game to play on the elliptical table: http://youtu.be/3WHBlPvK3Ek More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ And more extra footage: http://youtu.be/pulp55gTKGE Alex Bellos' Loop Table website: http://www.loop-the-game.com Alex discusses the topic in his book Alex Through the Looking

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Top ultrarunner Joasia Zakrzewski disqualified for using a car in race

Joasia Zakrzewski finished third in the 2023 GB Ultras Manchester to Liverpool 50-mile race - but is thought to have travelled by car for 2.5 miles. The 47-year-old GP, from Dumfries, is understood to have been tracked on GPX mapping data covering a mile of the race in just one minute 40 seconds.

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xkcd: Cosmological Nostalgia Content

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Guardsman applies to be hitman - gets arrested instead

BBC News, LondonA Tennessee Air National Guardsman has been arrested by the FBI after allegedly applying to be an assassin on satirical website "Rent-a-Hitman".Josiah Ernesto Garcia, 21, said he needed the money to support his family, according to court documents.

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The family secrets kept for generations

Last year, my friend Alex came to visit me in London from the US. We met over 10 years ago in New York City: I am a Black British Londoner, and Alex is originally from Michigan. During her visit, we talked about our careers, our families – and family secrets.

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AI anxiety: The workers who fear losing their jobs to artificial intelligence

Claire has worked as a PR at a major consulting firm, based in London, for six years. The 34-year-old enjoys her job and earns a comfortable salary, but in the past six months, she’s started to feel apprehensive about the future of her career. The reason: artificial intelligence.

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SpaceX Starship: Elon Musk's firm postpones launch of biggest rocket ever

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.By Jonathan AmosBBC Science Correspondent@BBCAmosAn attempt to launch the most powerful ever rocket into space has been postponed for at least 48 hours.

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The search for an objective measure of pain

How much does it hurt? You might think it's one of the simplest questions in health and medicine. But in fact, it can be a remarkably difficult question to answer objectively. Consider a doctor who has two patients who are grimacing and using similar words to describe their pain.

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How artificial intelligence is matching drugs to patients

Dr Talia Cohen Solal sits down at a microscope to look closely at human brain cells grown in a petri dish.

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Myanmar civil war: 'We wish we could go back'

Out on the crystal-clear water of Inle Lake, the boats putter back and forth, some piled high with water weeds they use on their gardens, others throwing out fishing cages.

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How Does The Nucleus Hold Together?

Check out http://rocketmoney.com/pbsspace or scan the QR code on the screen to start managing your personal finances today. Thank you to Rocket Money for sponsoring today's video! #rocketmoney #personalfinance PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http:/

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What If Black Holes ARE Dark Energy?

PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime We tend to imagine there are connectings between things that we don’t understand. Quan

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Germans split as last three nuclear power stations go off grid

On one side of Berlin's Brandenburg Gate on Saturday, there will be partying - anti-atomic activists will celebrate victory in a battle that has lasted 60 years.

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Million-year-old viruses help fight cancer, say scientists

Relics of ancient viruses - that have spent millions of years hiding inside human DNA - help the body fight cancer, say scientists. The study by the Francis Crick Institute showed the dormant remnants of these old viruses are woken up when cancerous cells spiral out of control.

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Kenya chess: Male player dons disguise to compete as woman

It was a bold gambit by the 25-year-old Kenyan chess player to disguise himself as a woman to compete in his country's female open chess tournament. Dressed head to toe in a burka and wearing spectacles, Stanley Omondi had registered himself as Millicent Awour.

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Beatriz Flamini: Athlete emerges after 500 days living in cave

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsA Spanish extreme athlete has emerged from a cave after spending 500 days with no human contact, in what could be a world record.

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How Far Beyond Earth Could Humanity Expand?

Check Out Untold Earth on PBS Terra: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BVHSUMAWR4&list=PLzkQfVIJun2J5q9CIXPAlL95FSb0tJul7&index=85 PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Disc

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European Space Agency: Jupiter moons mission set for second launch bid

The European Space Agency will make another attempt on Friday to launch its Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (Juice). Thursday's bid was thwarted by concerns about lightning over the Kourou spaceport in French Guiana.

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Japan approves plan to open its first casino

Japanese officials have approved controversial plans to build the country's first gambling resort. The complex will open in the western city of Osaka in 2029.

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Why ghost guns are America's fastest-growing gun problem

Ghost guns are coming under fire from gun-control advocates. But why are these weapons so difficult to trace? And can anything be done to keep them from getting into the wrong hands? Manuel Yambo had never heard of a "ghost" gun until his 16-year-old daughter was killed by one.

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Illeism: The ancient trick to help you think more wisely

As a writer specialising in psychology, I’ve come across hundreds of evidence-based tips for better thinking. Few have proven as useful to me as the ancient strategy of illeism. Put simply, illeism is the practice of talking about oneself in the third person, rather than the first person.

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Levitating Fire Experiment

In this video I show you how to make floating fire balls using specific fluid dynamics Watch other popular videos from my channel Superhydrophobic Knife Slices Water Drops in Half https://youtu.be/Ls_ISb7lG-I Real-Life Invisibility Cloak Can Hide Anything! How Does It Work? https://youtu.be/_miP7

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Juice: Jupiter moons mission to assess chance of life

The European Space Agency (Esa) is set to launch a satellite to the planet Jupiter, one of the organisation's most ambitious missions ever. The satellite will leave Earth on Thursday on an eight-year journey to reach the giant planet's major moons.

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Bear hunt after jogger is killed in Italian Alps

Italian authorities are on the hunt for a bear that killed a 26-year-old jogger in the north-eastern region of Trentino last week. Andrea Papi's funeral took place on Wednesday. The 17-year-old female bear that killed him was known as JJ4 and identified through genetic testing.

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Chichen Itza: Archaeologists discover scoreboard for ancient Maya ball game

Archaeologists in Mexico have uncovered an intricately carved stone they believe was used as a scoreboard for pelota, a ball game played by the Maya hundreds of years ago. The circular stone was found at the Chichen Itza archaeological site and is thought to be at least 1,200 years old.

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Elon Musk tells BBC that owning Twitter has been quite painful

Twitter boss Elon Musk has told the BBC that running the company has been "quite painful" and "a rollercoaster". However, the multi-billionaire entrepreneur also says that he would sell the company if the right person came along.

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Ukraine war: Leak shows Western special forces on the ground

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsThe UK is among a number of countries with military special forces operating inside Ukraine, according to one of dozens of documents leaked online. It confirms what has been the subject of quiet speculation for over a year.

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Why Aliens Might Already Be On Their Way To Us

Be a part of our first Limited Drop, which honors our Cosmic Pioneers and their noble expeditions: https://kgs.link/limited-drop. Stocks are limited – so grab yours before they’re gone for good! Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources-grabby-aliens/ The universe is mag

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Kuwait news outlet unveils AI-generated presenter Fedha

She appears as an image of a woman with light-coloured hair, wearing a black jacket and white T-shirt. Abdullah Boftain, deputy editor-in-chief for Kuwait News, told AFP news agency the move tested AI's potential to offer "new and innovative content".

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Tiger census: India now has 3,167 tigers, numbers show

India is now home to 3,167 tigers, 200 more than it had four years ago, according to estimates from the latest tiger census. Prime Minister Narendra Modi released the report on Sunday at an event to mark 50 years of the country's Project Tiger campaign.

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Dalai Lama sorry to young boy after kissing row

The Dalai Lama has apologised for an interaction with a young boy in a viral video that set off a controversy. The video shows the Tibetan spiritual leader kissing the child on his lips. He then sticks his tongue out and can be heard asking the boy to suck it.

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Why do some people 'mirror-write'?

As a child, I thought all left-handed people could mirror-write. As a left-hander myself, I occasionally tried it, starting on the right-hand side of the page and letting the letters flow leftwards.

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Ukraine war: Who leaked top secret US documents - and why?

What to make of the dozens of classified US Defence Department documents - maps, charts and photographs - now circulating on the internet?

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Twitter: BBC objects to 'government-funded media' tag

The BBC is objecting to a new label describing it as "government funded media" on one of its main Twitter accounts. The corporation says it is speaking to Twitter about the designation on the @BBC account to "resolve this issue as soon as possible".

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From The Conversation

In 1956, during a year-long trip to London and in his early 20s, the mathematician and theoretical biologist Jack D Cowan visited Wilfred Taylor and his strange new "learning machine". On his arrival he was baffled by the "huge bank of apparatus" that confronted him.

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People were taking drugs in Spain 3,000 years ago, study finds

People were getting high on hallucinogenic drugs in Spain around 3,000 years ago, according to new research. Scientists say that hair from a burial site in Menorca shows that ancient human civilisations used drugs derived from plants and bushes.

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Covid origins: Chinese scientists publish long-awaited data

The Huanan seafood and wildlife market has been a focal point in the search for the origin of the coronavirus. But this is the first peer-reviewed study of biological evidence gathered from the market back in 2020.

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The Easter Bunny: Evolution of a symbol

Easter is a Christian festival that celebrates the resurrection of Christ after his crucifixion on Good Friday. And yet everywhere we see it symbolised by a floppy-eared, bucktoothed, and egg-dispensing lagomorph. Where exactly did the Easter Bunny tradition derive from?

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The phones that detect earthquakes

On 25 October 2022, a 5.1-magnitude earthquake jolted California’s Bay Area. Fortunately, it was more of a than a violent shake, but reports from residents across the region flooded into the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from those who had felt it.

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Arculata: The bread that survived Pompeii

It was shortly after midday when the baker stepped out of the front door of his shop onto a small side street. He needed fresh air and a moment to himself. It had been a busy night of milling and bread-making.

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Biden administration blames chaotic Afghan pull-out on Trump

US President Joe Biden's administration has blamed its chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan on his predecessor, Donald Trump, in a new report. But the report also acknowledges that the government should have begun the evacuation of civilians earlier.

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King Charles supports study into royal family slavery links

The King has expressed his support for the first time for research into the Royal Family's historical links to the slave trade.

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Could dinosaurs have grown any bigger?

In 2001, paleontologists Kristina Curry Rogers and Catherine Forster found a single rib bone in Madagascar that was nearly 3m (9.84 ft) long, roughly the length of a ping pong table.

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South Africa snake on plane: Deadly cobra in cockpit forces emergency landing

It felt like just another flight for South African pilot Rudolph Erasmus, until he noticed an extra passenger on his plane at 11,000ft in the air. However, it wasn't a human, but a cobra slithering under his seat.

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The Great War: The WW1 video game that's eerily accurate

There are many images of World War One sewn into the popular imagination, but now video gamers are able to experience the conflict's Earth-churning intensity as if first-hand.

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Virgin Orbit: Richard Branson's rocket firm files for bankruptcy

British billionaire Sir Richard Branson's rocket company Virgin Orbit has filed for bankruptcy in the US after failing to secure new investment. The satellite launch company halted operations weeks ago but it hopes to find a buyer for the business.

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How stretching actually changes your muscles - Malachy McHugh

Dig into the science of stretching, and find out what it actually does to your muscles and how you can improve your flexibility. -- An athlete is preparing for a game. They’ve put on their gear and done their warmup, and now it’s time for one more routine — stretching. Typically, athletes st

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The pilots who ejected underwater – and lived

On 13 October 1954, a Royal Navy aviator called Bruce MacFarlane took off from the deck of the British aircraft carrier Albion, somewhere in the Mediterranean. Moments later his plane plunged into the water in front of the ship.

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Spy balloon sent data to China in real time - report

The Chinese balloon that flew over the US earlier this year managed to gather intelligence from military bases for days before it was shot down, US media report. The balloon was able to transmit data to Beijing in real time, NBC News reported, citing US officials.

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Solitary Confinement: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

John Oliver discusses solitary confinement, how prevalent it is, how damaging it can be, and, of course, how to hit the woah. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/lastweektonight F

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Would you open up to a chatbot therapist?

Would you share your deepest anxiety with Alexa? Or maybe ask Siri for some emotional support after a particularly stressful day? We are increasingly turning to chatbots on smart speakers or websites and apps to answer questions.

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Five countries that are safer for women

After a long pandemic pause on travel, people aren't waiting around for a partner to get packing. The interest in solo travel continues to rise worldwide, especially among women.

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Cafe bomb in St Petersburg kills Russian military blogger

An explosion in a St Petersburg cafe has killed prominent Russian military blogger Vladlen Tatarsky, Russia's Interior Ministry has confirmed. At least 25 people were injured in the bomb blast at Street Food Bar No 1.

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Russian invasion of Ukraine

On 24 February 2022, Russia invaded Ukraine in an escalation of the Russo-Ukrainian War that started in 2014. The invasion became the largest attack on a European country since World War II.

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Two hijab-less Iranian women arrested after man attacks them with yoghurt

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsTwo women have been arrested in Iran after being attacked with yoghurt, seemingly for not covering their hair in public.In the video, which went viral, two female customers are approached by the man, who begins talking to them.

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Lazarus Heist: The intercontinental ATM theft that netted $14m in two hours

Imagine you're a low-wage worker in India who is offered a day's employment as an extra in a Bollywood film. Your role? To go to a cash point and withdraw some money.

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ChatGPT banned in Italy over privacy concerns

Italy has become the first Western country to block advanced chatbot ChatGPT. The Italian data-protection authority said there were privacy concerns relating to the model, which was created by US start-up OpenAI and is backed by Microsoft.

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Swimmer 'body shamed' in surf club nudity row

An Australian woman has spoken out after she received a warning letter that she had broken surf club rules by being naked in a changing room. Ocean swimmer Nada Pantle was told she had breached a "no nudity" clause in the club's child safe policy.

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Virgin Orbit: Sir Richard Branson's rocket company lays off 85% of staff

British billionaire Sir Richard Branson's rocket company Virgin Orbit says it will lay off 85% of staff after failing to secure new investment. The firm will also cease operations for the foreseeable future, according to media reports.

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Friend or foe: Can computer coders trust ChatGPT?

He's talking about the latest version of ChatGPT, an artificial intelligence (AI) tool. You type something in, and it makes up a reply for you. It's uncanny how human, friendly and intelligent the responses seem. Underneath it is an AI model called GPT-4.

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Donald Trump indictment: Ex-US president to be charged over hush money

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC News, WashingtonFormer US President Donald Trump will be charged over hush money payments made to a porn star just before the 2016 presidential election.The details of the case against him have not yet been released.

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Spanish anger over TV star Ana Obregón's surrogate baby in US

Spanish TV actress Ana Obregón has come under fire after revealing that she has had a baby girl via surrogacy in the US at the age of 68. Obregón is best known for starring in a number of Spanish sitcoms.

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The benefits of 'deep time thinking'

In 1788, three men set off to search a stretch of coast in eastern Scotland, looking for a very special outcrop of rocks. It would reveal that Earth was far, far older than anybody thought.  Leading the party was James Hutton, one of the first geologists.

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Dmitry Muratov: Nuclear warning from Russia's Nobel-winning journalist

The Russian authorities may have shut down his newspaper, but journalist Dmitry Muratov refuses to be silenced. When we meet in Moscow, the editor-in-chief of Novaya Gazeta and Russia's Nobel Peace Prize laureate is worried how far the Kremlin will go in its confrontation with the West.

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Lesotho MP demands huge parts of South Africa

Lesotho's parliament has debated a motion to claim huge swathes of territory from its much larger neighbour, South Africa. An opposition MP wants to declare Free State and parts of four other provinces "Lesotho's territory".

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Elon Musk among experts urging a halt to AI training

Key figures in artificial intelligence want training of powerful AI systems to be suspended amid fears of a threat to humanity. They have signed an open letter warning of potential risks, and say the race to develop AI systems is out of control.

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Italy moves to ban lab-grown meat to protect food heritage

Italy's right-wing government has backed a bill that would ban laboratory-produced meat and other synthetic foods, highlighting Italian food heritage and health protection. If the proposals go through, breaking the ban would attract fines of up to €60,000 (£53,000).

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Bali: Russian man to be deported for posing naked on sacred Mount Agung

The man, identified only as Yuri, has apologised but will be barred from re-entering Indonesia for at least six months. Bali has recently increased efforts to crack down on badly-behaved foreign tourists.

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The Filipino islanders who weave their dreams

"In Mindanao, some women weave their dreams into textiles. They are dream-weavers," said the volunteer at the Museum of Philippine Economic History in the Filipino city of Iloilo. He pointed to a picture of white-and-red linear patterns woven on a black background.

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How pollution is causing a male fertility crisis

"We can sort you out. No problem. We can help you," the doctor told Jennifer Hannington. Then he turned to her husband, Ciaran, and said: "But there's not much we can do for you." The couple, who live in Yorkshire, England, had been trying for a baby for two years.

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AI could replace equivalent of 300 million jobs - report

Artificial intelligence (AI) could replace the equivalent of 300 million full-time jobs, a report by investment bank Goldman Sachs says. It could replace a quarter of work tasks in the US and Europe but may also mean new jobs and a productivity boom.

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Martine Vik Magnussen: Billionaire’s son admits role in death to BBC

Image source, Odd PetterBBC News Arabic special correspondentA billionaire's son, who fled to Yemen within hours of the death of a student in London 15 years ago, has admitted his involvement to the BBC.

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Amateur Australian gold digger finds massive nugget

An Australian man armed with a budget metal detector has hit the jackpot, finding a 4.6kg rock containing gold worth A$240,000 (£130,000; $160,000). The man, who doesn't want to be named, made the discovery in Victoria's goldfields - which were the heart of Australia's gold rush in the 1800s.

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Nazare: Love and pain on the world's biggest wave

As he looks out from his balcony, over slumped, drying wetsuits, Andrew Cotton can see it all. The stretch of sand, the salt haze, a spike of cliff and a scarlet lighthouse.

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Italian art experts astonished by David statue uproar in Florida

The Florence museum that houses Michelangelo's statue of David has invited teachers and students from a Florida school to visit, after an uproar over an art lesson. The school's principal quit after a complaint about a sixth-grade art class that included an image of the statue.

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The web firm that wants to stop you getting 'cancelled'

The defiant claim came from Devin Nunes, who is the chief executive of Trump Media and Technology Group, the firm set up by Mr Trump in 2021 to run his social media app Truth Social.

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Lebanon wakes up in two rival time zones

People in Lebanon have woken up in two rival time zones, amid a row between political and religious authorities over when clocks should go forward.

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The photo tradition at Christian funerals in Kerala

Bittu, who goes by only one name, has been running his photo studio in the southern Indian state of Kerala for nearly 20 years. His work is dedicated to capturing significant events in a person's life - from baptisms, engagements, and weddings to funerals.

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Have we found the 'animal origin' of Covid?

We now have "the best evidence" we are ever likely to find of how the virus that causes Covid-19 was first transmitted to a human, a team of scientists has claimed.

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Principal resigns after Florida students shown Michelangelo statue

BBC NewsA principal of a Florida school has been forced to resign after a parent complained that sixth-grade students were exposed to pornography.The complaint arose from a Renaissance art lesson where students were shown Michelangelo's statue of David.

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Relative Terms

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Massive asteroid to pass by Earth on weekend

An asteroid large enough to destroy a city will pass between the orbits of the Earth and the Moon this weekend - luckily for us, missing both. The object, named 2023 DZ2, was discovered a month ago.

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Why spring-cleaning won't benefit your health

With spring around the corner in the Northern Hemisphere, many of us are ready to open the windows, get out the cleaning products and remove all the dust, grime and dirt in our homes.

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Hidden history of Scotland's biggest nuclear bunker

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC Scotland, Edinburgh and East reporterScotland's biggest Cold War bunker is buried deep beneath an Edinburgh hill - and its existence has remained unknown to most people for decades.

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Beethoven: Tests on hair prove composer's genetic health woes

Beethoven had a likely genetic predisposition to liver disease and a hepatitis B infection months before his death, tests have revealed. They were, however, unable to establish a definitive cause of his hearing loss.

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Bill Gates: AI is most important tech advance in decades

Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates says the development of artificial intelligence (AI) is the most important technological advance in decades. In a blog post on Tuesday, he called it as fundamental as the creation of the microprocessor, the personal computer, the Internet, and the mobile phone.

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Climate change: Can we really take CO2 back out the air?

Humanity is on thin ice.

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Bard: Google's rival to ChatGPT launches for over-18s

Google has started rolling out its AI chatbot Bard, but it is only available to certain users and they have to be over the age of 18. Unlike its viral rival ChatGPT, it can access up-to-date information from the internet and has a "Google it" button which accesses search.

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The numbers that are too big to imagine

What's the biggest number you can think of? When I was a child, it's the kind of question we'd ask each other in the school playground.

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Why content management systems can outperform static site generators

One or two times a month I get the following question: Why don't you just use a Static Site Generator (SSG) for your blog? Well, I'm not gonna lie, being the founder and project lead of Drupal definitely plays a role in why I use Drupal for my website.

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Sri Lanka: $3bn IMF bailout for struggling economy

Sri Lanka has secured a $3bn (£2.4bn) bailout from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as it faces its worst economic crisis since independence. The deal has been nearly a year in the making and a lifeline for the country that has billions of dollars in loans.

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Amritpal Singh: Punjab police step up search for controversial preacher

Police in India's Punjab have launched a massive search for Amritpal Singh, a controversial self-styled preacher who has been on the run since Saturday. Internet and messaging services in the state have remained suspended since the search began and security has been tightened.

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Credit Suisse: Bank rescue damages Switzerland's reputation for stability

So farewell to Credit Suisse. Founded in 1856, the bank has been a pillar of the Swiss financial sector ever since. Although buffeted by the financial crisis of 2008, Credit Suisse did manage to weather that storm without a government bailout, unlike its rival-turned-rescuer UBS.

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Give babies peanut butter to cut allergy by 77%, study says

Giving young babies - between four and six months old - tiny tastes of smooth peanut butter could dramatically cut peanut allergies, say scientists. Research shows there is a crucial opportunity during weaning to cut allergy cases by 77%.

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The six ancient Norse myths that still resonate today

The US writer Mark Twain famously wrote: "There is no such thing as a new idea. We simply take a lot of old ideas and put them into a sort of mental kaleidoscope. We give them a turn and they make new and curious combinations."  This is particularly true of storytelling.

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Will shipping return to its ancient roots?

Spend a moment looking at the things around you – from the phone you're holding to the clothes you're wearing – the odds are that roughly 90% of everything you own came to you over the ocean.

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Tonnes of uranium gone missing from Libya site, UN says

Two and a half tonnes of uranium have gone missing from a site in Libya, the UN's nuclear watchdog has said. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) sounded the alarm after a visit by its inspectors to the undisclosed site earlier this week.

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How the seasons change our sleep

The arrival of spring often heralds a welcome change after the long, hard winter months. The Sun stays up for longer, the days grow warmer, the first flowers begin to bloom, and in many countries the clocks tick forward into daylight savings time to lengthen our evenings.

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AI: How 'freaked out' should we be?

Artificial intelligence has the awesome power to change the way we live our lives, in both good and dangerous ways. Experts have little confidence that those in power are prepared for what's coming.

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The doctors selling bogus treatments to people facing blindness

Doctors around the world are offering false hope and bogus treatments to millions of people with an incurable condition that can lead to blindness. BBC reporter Ramadan Younes, who has the disease himself, went undercover to expose them.

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Australia's epic 1,077km road trip

In every direction, fire-red sand fanned out across the land. Everything that wasn't red seemed covered in it: the boab trees, the spinifex, the termite mounds stretching like tiny Towers of Babel towards the sky. The road itself shimmered like a sea of rubies.

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Extreme travel: It just got harder to see every place in the world

Extreme travel isn't for the faint-hearted. Kari-Matti Valtari would know. He has been arrested many times and held in detention in war-torn nations, but has seen everywhere from St Eustatius to the Savage Islands*.

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GPT-4

You are a tutor that always responds in the Socratic style. You *never* give the student the answer, but always try to ask just the right question to help them learn to think for themselves.

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A zebra in Ohio attacked a man and charged police before it was shot

Police in Ohio fatally shot a zebra after it bit its owner on the arm and continued to act aggressively toward officers, authorities said. Officers arrived to the man's home in Circleville, Ohio, on Sunday after he called and reported that "his arm had been bitten off by a zebra".

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Periods in sport: Ireland team to wear navy shorts for Six Nations

The Ireland women's rugby team has chosen to swap their traditional white shorts and make a permanent switch to navy because of period concerns. The move comes as a response to feedback from players about playing in white rugby kit during their period.

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The slowest train journey in India

The Bollywood movie Dil Se may have opened to a lukewarm response at the Indian box office, but one of the song sequences from the movie remains a favourite melody 25 years on.

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Is India-China infrastructure race damaging Himalayas?

With fresh cracks appearing on the ground, the Himalayan town of Joshimath in northern India continues to make headlines. Why the town is sinking remains a subject of debate. But scientists say there is a bigger disturbing picture unfolding in the Himalayas.

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How the search for Iraq's secret weapons fell apart

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The Serbian who inspired US Capitol rioters, then emigrated to Texas

A man whose video inspired one of the main leaders of the Capitol riots emigrated to the United States soon after the 2020 election. The BBC has found that he and his wife continue to encourage political violence on their social media accounts, a trend that worries extremism experts.

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Your pictures on the theme of 'voyage'

We asked our readers to send in their best pictures on the theme of "voyage". Here is a selection of the photographs we received from around the world. The next theme is "machinery" and the deadline for entries is 21 March 2023.

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Why don't humans have fur?

If an alien race came to Earth and lined up humans in a row alongside all the other primates, one of the first differences they might observe – together with our upright position and unique form of communication – is our apparently furless bodies.

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Meta exploring plans for Twitter rival

Meta, the parent firm of Facebook and Instagram, is working on a standalone, text-based social network app. It could rival both Twitter and its decentralised competitor, Mastodon.

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Hamburg shooting: Seven killed in attack on Jehovah's Witness hall

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsSeven people, including an unborn baby, have been killed in a shooting at a Jehovah's Witness meeting hall in the German city of Hamburg, police say.

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Berlin to allow women to go topless in public swimming pools

Women will soon be allowed to swim topless in Berlin's public pools, after a ruling by the city's authorities. It comes after a woman who was thrown out of an open-air pool for sunbathing topless took legal action.

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WhatsApp: Rather be blocked in UK than weaken security

WhatsApp says it would rather be blocked in the UK than undermine its encrypted-messaging system, if required to do so under the Online Safety Bill. Its head, Will Cathcart, said it would refuse to comply if asked to weaken the privacy of encrypted messages.

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Google company unveils drone delivery-network ambition

Image source, WingTechnology reporterA subsidiary of Alphabet, which owns Google, hopes to develop drone delivery-network technology able to handle tens of millions of orders, within 12 months.Operating drones as a network, Wing says, will improve efficiency.

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Climate change: New idea for sucking up CO2 from air shows promise

The authors say that this novel approach captures CO2 from the atmosphere up to three times more efficiently than current methods. The warming gas can be transformed into bicarbonate of soda and stored safely and cheaply in seawater.

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What's Up With The New JWST Findings? With Neil deGrasse Tyson

What did the early universe really look like? Neil deGrasse Tyson breaks down the new JWST finding about early galaxies and how it changes our understanding of the universe. What is or existing model of the early universe? Learn about the dark ages and the creation of galaxies and stars. Were the

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What Does an Electron Look Like?

Checkout our sponsor, Betterhelp, for 10% off your first month: https://www.betterhelp.com/actionlab Shop the Action Lab Science Gear here: https://theactionlab.com/ Checkout my experiment book: https://amzn.to/2Wf07x1 Twitter: https://twitter.com/theactionlabman Facebook: https://www.facebook.c

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US six-year-old who shot teacher won't be charged - prosecutor

Image source, Abby Zwerner/FacebookBBC NewsA six-year-old boy who shot his teacher in a primary school in the US state of Virginia is unlikely to be charged, a prosecutor has said. But authorities in the city of Newport News have yet to decide if any adult will face criminal charges in the case.

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Tucker Carlson said he hates Trump 'passionately', lawsuit reveals

Fox News host Tucker Carlson said in a text message after the 2020 election that he "passionately hated" Donald Trump, according to new court filings. Mr Carlson's message to a colleague in January 2021 emerged as part of a defamation lawsuit by Dominion Voting Systems against Fox News.

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Thai man jailed for insulting king over duck calendar

Image source, THAI LAWYERS FOR HUMAN RIGHTSBBC NewsA Thai man has been jailed for two years for selling calendars which featured satirical comments and rubber ducks in royal regalia, which prosecutors said defamed the monarchy.

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Bumblebees learn to solve puzzles by watching peers, study finds

Bumblebees learn to solve puzzles by watching their more experienced peers, scientists in Britain have found. Experts from Queen Mary University of London trained a set of bees to open a puzzle box containing a sugar reward.

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Amsterdam ‘erotic centre’: EMA unhappy at planned red-light district

The European drugs regulator says it does not want a purpose-built red-light district near its post-Brexit headquarters in Amsterdam. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) says it fears "nuisance, drug-dealing, drunkenness and disorderly behaviour".

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Robot arm would grab defunct British satellite from orbit

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.By Jonathan AmosBBC Science Correspondent@BBCAmosThe Astroscale-UK company has unveiled its concept to remove a defunct British satellite from orbit.

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xkcd: Launch Window

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Egypt archaeology: Dig unearths smiling mini-sphinx which may represent Claudius

Archaeologists have unearthed a sphinx-like statue and the remains of a shrine in an ancient temple in southern Egypt, the antiquities ministry says. The artefacts were found near the Hathor Temple, one of Egypt's best-preserved ancient sites.

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China's new human gene-editing rules worry experts

New rules in China to regulate gene editing in humans don't go far enough, a leading expert has warned scientists. Dr Joy Zhang of Kent University, a global expert on the governance of gene editing in China, said authorities are susceptible to "regulatory negligence".

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The disputed history of the Coronation Stone

Westminster Abbey is one of the most famous religious buildings in the world and one of London's key tourist sites. Built by Edward the Confessor in 1040, it has been the site of royal coronations since 1066.

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Toblerone: Swiss rules mean chocolate bar to drop Matterhorn from packaging

Toblerone is to remove the Matterhorn mountain peak from its packaging after some of the chocolate's production was moved outside Switzerland. The pyramid-shaped bar, which mirrors the Alpine peak, will undergo a labelling revamp and include its founder's signature, its maker said.

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Matt Hancock: Leaked messages suggest plan to frighten public

Matt Hancock suggested to an aide that they "frighten the pants off everyone" about Covid, messages published by the Sunday Telegraph show. It appears the former health secretary discussed when to reveal the existence of the Kent variant of Covid to ensure people complied with lockdown rules.

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What is the UN High Seas Treaty and why is it needed?

After more than a decade of negotiations, United Nations member countries have agreed the first ever treaty to protect the world's oceans that lie outside national boundaries.

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Ocean treaty: Historic agreement reached after decade of talks

Nations have reached a historic agreement to protect the world's oceans following 10 years of negotiations. The High Seas Treaty aims to help place 30% of the seas into protected areas by 2030, to safeguard and recuperate marine nature.

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How the Moon is making days longer on Earth

Throughout human history the Moon has been an inextricable, ghostly presence above the Earth. Its gentle gravitational tug sets the rhythm of the tides, while its pale light illuminates the nocturnal nuptials of many species.

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Matteo Messina Denaro: Coded note led to Italy mafia boss arrest

Image source, ReutersBBC NewsA coded note hidden inside a chair leg helped lead to the arrest of Italy's most-wanted Mafia boss Matteo Messina Denaro, a warrant shows.

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The giant arcs that may dwarf everything in the cosmos

In 2021, British PhD student Alexia Lopez was analysing the light coming from distant quasars when she made a startling discovery. She detected a giant, almost symmetrical arc of galaxies 9.3 billion light years away in the constellation of Boötes the Herdsman. Spanning a massive 3.

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‘The Art of War’: The greatest strategy book ever written | Roger Martin

Strategy advisor Roger Martin explains how 2,000 year old military thinking is useful in modern business strategy. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, Navy SEAL has a '40 Percent Rule' and it's the key to overcom

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Egypt: Hidden corridor in Great Pyramid of Giza seen for first time

Egyptian antiquities officials say they have confirmed the existence of a hidden internal corridor above the main entrance of the Great Pyramid of Giza. Video from an endoscope showed the inside of the corridor, which is 9m (30ft) long and 2.1m (7ft) wide.

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LGBTQ rights: Japan PM under fire for same-sex marriage remarks

Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has been criticised for saying the country's ban on same-sex marriage is not discriminatory. Weeks ago, he apologised to the LGBTQ community over homophobic comments made by an aide who has since been sacked.

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How fake copyright complaints are muzzling journalists

Journalists have been forced to temporarily take down articles critical of powerful oil lobbyists due to the exploitation of US copyright law, according to a new report.

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The problems with TikTok's controversial 'beauty filters'

When I came across my first "beauty filter" – technology designed to "improve" your appearance, now popular on Instagram, Snapchat and TikTok – one of my first reactions was that it evened out the playing field and not, necessarily, in a bad way.

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FBI chief Christopher Wray says China lab leak most likely

FBI Director Christopher Wray has said that the bureau believes Covid-19 most likely originated in a Chinese government-controlled lab. It is the first public confirmation of the FBI's classified judgement of how the pandemic virus emerged.

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SPEED COMPARISON 3D | Fastest Man Made Objects

SPEED COMPARISON 3D | Fastest Man Made Objects This video took me a lot of time, the calculation of speed and distance traveled was easy, but building the Scene was a bit hard. In this video we compare most fastest objects Man Made over years, we put some other Things just for reference to underst

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Peruvian delivery man carried ancient mummy around in his bag

Police in Peru made a surprise discovery when they searched a delivery man who came to their attention for acting drunk at an ancient archaeological site in Puno. Inside his cooler bag was an ancient mummy.

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The Best Way to Boost Your Immune System (With Science!)

Offset your carbon footprint on Wren: ​https://www.wren.co/kurzgesagt. For the first 200 people who sign up, Kurzgesagt will pay for the first month of your subscription! This video was sponsored by Wren, thanks a lot for the support! Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sour

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TikTok answers three big cybersecurity fears about the app

China has accused the US of exaggerating the concept of national security in order to suppress foreign companies, amid a growing row over TikTok.

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Amritpal Singh: The self-styled preacher raising fears in India's Punjab

Last week, hundreds of supporters of controversial self-styled preacher Amritpal Singh stormed a police station in the northern Indian state of Punjab, demanding the release of an arrested aide.

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Green flights not in easy reach, warn scientists

You may be hoping that guilt-free flying is just around the corner, but scientists warn it is still a long way off. Plans for climate-friendly flying rest on creating greener jet fuels that have less impact on the environment.

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Inside the UK's Mormon missionary boot camp

Every year, thousands of young Mormons go on missions to try to recruit others into the religion. The BBC was given access to their UK boot camp, where they learn how to teach Mormon beliefs and use social media to reach potential converts.

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Ukraine war: Viral conspiracy theories falsely claim the war is fake

The first anniversary of Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine has led to a spike in false claims about the war on social media, with some posts gaining millions of engagements.

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Artificial Intelligence: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Artificial intelligence is increasingly becoming part of our lives, from self-driving cars to ChatGPT. John Oliver discusses how AI works, where it might be heading next, and, of course, why it hates the bus. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube chan

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Twitter CEO Elon Musk defends Dilbert creator's racist tirade

Elon Musk accused US media of racism on Monday, defending racist comments made by Dilbert cartoon creator Scott Adams on YouTube last week. Twitter's CEO tweeted that media was once racist against non-whites, but ''now they're racist against whites & Asians''.

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River Thames: Mudlarker discovers rare Tudor leather wrist guard

BBC NewsA well-preserved archer's leather wrist guard, thought to date back to Tudor times, has been unearthed on the Thames riverbank.Found by London mudlarker Alessio Checconi on 18 February, the Museum of London has confirmed its authenticity.

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Northern lights: Aurora seen across UK in spectacular display

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC WeatherIn a very rare display, the northern lights were seen as far south as Kent and Cornwall on Sunday night.Across more northern areas of the UK, the display was one of the best seen in a very long time by BBC Weather Watchers.

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Should you avoid eating burnt food?

It's more than likely you still have some of the habits around eating and cooking that you learned from adults when you were young, maybe without even realising. Perhaps you never lick food off your knife, or you always throw salt over your shoulder to ward off evil spirits.

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Physical 100: Are K-reality shows the next Korean cultural trend?

They need to push a 1,500kg wooden ship through sand and up a ramp, but the ship won't budge. Jang knows her team is the weakest on paper. Then, to the tune of her rallying cries, the boat begins to inch forward.

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Nile Wilson: ‘I was one of the fittest athletes on the planet. Then I was struggling to walk’

Former Olympic gymnast and Go Hard or Go Home star Nile Wilson on the injury that ended his career, his descent into addiction and the power of asking for help. In 2016, Nile Wilson won bronze on the horizontal bar at the Rio Olympics.

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Dilbert comic strip dropped by US media over creator's racist tirade

Many US newspapers including the Washington Post have dropped the long-running Dilbert cartoon strip after its creator made racist comments. In a video on YouTube, Scott Adams, who is white, said black Americans were part of a "hate group" and that white people should "get the hell away" from them.

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Ukraine's Banksy stamps feature art of Putin in judo match

Ukraine has issued postage stamps featuring a mural by renowned UK graffiti artist Banksy to mark the first anniversary of Russia's full-scale invasion. The mural depicts a man resembling Russian President Vladimir Putin being flipped during a judo match with a young boy.

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The AI emotions dreamed up by ChatGPT

I'm talking to Dan, otherwise known as "Do Anything Now", a shady young chatbot with a whimsical fondness for penguins – and a tendency to fall into villainous clichés like wanting to take over the world.

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Brothers leave Guantanamo Bay without charge after almost 20 years

Two brothers from Pakistan who were held in the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay for nearly 20 years have been released without charge. Abdul and Mohammed Ahmed Rabbani were arrested in Pakistan in 2002.

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Roald Dahl: Original books to be printed by Penguin following criticism

Roald Dahl's original books are to be printed under their Puffin titles, publishing house Penguin has said. The unaltered story books will now go alongside updated versions of his hugely popular children's writing.

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The mysterious items washing up on beaches

It's around 1.5m (5ft) wide, almost perfectly spherical – and people in Japan aren't quite sure what it is. This week, a mysterious round ball washed up on the coast off the city of Hamamatsu, prompting widespread speculation about what it might be.

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JK Rowling dismisses backlash over trans comments: 'I don't care about my legacy'

JK Rowling has said she isn't concerned about how the backlash to her position on transgender issues will affect her legacy, and that anyone who thinks she is has "profoundly" misunderstood her.

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Mormon Church fined over claim it hid $32bn investment fund

The Mormon Church, officially known as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), and its investment firm will pay out $5m (£4.1m) over claims they hid a huge cache of shares.

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Judge blocks 9/11 victims' claim to Afghan assets

Victims of the 9/11 attacks are not entitled to seize $3.5bn (£2.9bn) in assets belonging to Afghanistan's central bank, a US judge has ruled. Lawyers pursuing the compensation argued these funds could satisfy court judgments they had obtained against Afghanistan's ruling Taliban.

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Spain officials quit over trains that were too wide for tunnels

Two top Spanish transport officials have resigned over a botched order for new commuter trains that cost nearly €260m ($275m; £230m). The trains could not fit into non-standard tunnels in the northern regions of Asturias and Cantabria.

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Perpetual Motion Achieved

Thanks to Harry’s for sponsoring! Redeem a Harry’s Trial Set for just $5 when you go to https://harrys.com/action Shop the Action Lab Science Gear here: https://theactionlab.com/ Checkout my experiment book: https://amzn.to/2Wf07x1 Twitter: https://twitter.com/theactionlabman Facebook: https

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The tech helping people get a better night's sleep

Have you ever laid in bed at night, with sleep tantalisingly out of reach while thoughts ricocheted around your head? If so, then the plight of Lisa Holland from Chesterfield in Derbyshire, may strike a chord.

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Ghana President Nana Akufo-Addo's cathedral plan stalls amid economic crisis

In the heart of Ghana's capital, Accra, hoardings plastered with artistic impressions of an architectural marvel block prying eyes from seeing what lies on the other side.

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Rachid M'Barki from BFM suspended in scandal linked to disinformation firm

The suspension of a senior journalist at France's leading TV news channel has uncovered what appears to be a well-organised system of corruption and influence buying in the international media.

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From The MIT Press Reader

Nothing shows more clearly the perfect engineering of the heart than our own failed attempts to imitate it. This history of the total artificial heart is punctuated with both brilliant innovation and continual clinical failure. In 1962, John F.

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Data Quality

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US cancer patient developed 'uncontrollable' Irish accent

BBC NewsA US man developed an "uncontrollable Irish accent" after being diagnosed with prostate cancer, despite having never visited Ireland, researchers say.The North Carolina man, who was in his 50s, was presumably afflicted with foreign accent syndrome (FAS), the British Medical Journal reports.

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Why we can dream in more than one language

Just after I began work on this article, I had a very fitting dream. I was hosting a party in a hotel suite, with guests from the US, Pakistan, and other countries. Most of the guests were chatting away in English; one or two spoke German, my mother tongue.

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Bankrupt Alex Jones spends nearly $100,000 a month

Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones has filed for bankruptcy but has nearly $10m (£8.3m) in assets and spends almost $100,000 (£83,000) a month, according to court filings. He owes almost $1.5bn in court-awarded damages to relatives of victims in the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting.

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Bruce Willis has dementia, family announces

This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version. You can receive Breaking News on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts.

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Mozambique pastor dies attempting 40-day Jesus fast

Image source, Barajah familyBBC News, Maputo, MozambiqueA pastor in Mozambique has died after trying to fast for 40 days, emulating what Christ is said to have done in the Bible.

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Wieambilla shooting: Australia police ambush deemed religious terror attack

Image source, Queensland PoliceBBC News, Sydney A shooting ambush in a remote Australian town that left six people dead has been declared a religiously-motivated terrorist attack.Authorities say it is the first time Christian extremist ideology has been linked to a terror attack in Australia.

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Omniknot

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Elon Musk donates almost $2bn of Tesla shares to charity

Tesla chief executive Elon Musk says he donated around $1.95bn (£1.6bn) worth of shares in his electric carmaker to charity last year. The donation of 11.6 million shares was described in a filing with US regulators as "a bona fide gift".

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The ancient diseases that plagued the dinosaurs

On a wet, stormy day some 77 million years ago in what is now south-eastern Alberta, Canada, a certain horned dinosaurwas having a very bad time.

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New Rule: A Unified Theory of Wokeness | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)

Subscribe to the Real Time YouTube: http://itsh.bo/10r5A1B It's time to stop judging everyone in the past by the standards of the present. Connect with Real Time Online: Find Real Time on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Maher Find Real Time on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RealTimers Find Real T

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Male contraceptive pill prototype stops sperm swimming

An on-demand, non-hormonal male contraceptive pill may be a real possibility say scientists who have found a cell pathway, or switch, that stops sperm from being able to swim. Tests in mice suggest it keeps sperm stunned for at least a few hours - long enough to stop them reaching the egg.

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Sara Khadem: Top Iran chess player exiled for refusing headscarf

When one of the world's most promising chess players, 25-year-old Sara Khadem, decided to play at an international tournament without her headscarf, in solidarity with the protest movement in Iran, she thought a warning would be the worst that would happen to her.

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Weather Station

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Super Bowl Jesus advert draws ire on left and right

Most Super Bowl adverts plug things like fizzy drink and cars, but one of the most talked-about commercials the day after the big game was selling Jesus - and it upset several very different political tribes.

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Could AI swamp social media with fake accounts?

Whether it's getting cookery advice or help with a speech, ChatGPT has been the first opportunity for many people to play with an artificial intelligence (AI) system. ChatGPT is based an an advanced language processing technology, developed by OpenAI.

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Valentine's Day: How fake dates help Indians find love and intimacy

Akansha* could feel anxiety well up inside her as she sat opposite her date. So the 26-year-old began fidgeting with the cutlery on the table and avoiding eye contact.

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More than 4,800 victims of sexual abuse uncovered in Portugal's Catholic Church

An independent commission looking into the sexual abuse of minors in the Catholic Church said on Tuesday it had documented cases pointing to at least 4,815 victims.

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Why the human genome was never completed

Before the end of 2023, you should be able to read something remarkable. It will be the story of a single individual, who they are and where they come from – and it will offer hints about what their future holds.

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Ancient stone tools found in Kenya made by early humans

Archaeologists in Kenya have dug up some of the oldest stone tools ever used by ancient humans, dating back around 2.9 million years. It is evidence that the tools were used by other branches of early humans, not just the ancestors of Homo Sapiens.

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Can we make the internet less power-thirsty?

So much of what we do every day involves a data centre. Shopping online, streaming TV shows, reading this story - they all need data to be stored and readily available. The immediacy and convenience of those services is great, but that comes at a cost.

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Amsterdam bans cannabis in its red light district

It will soon be illegal to smoke cannabis on the street in Amsterdam's red light district under new regulations unveiled by the city. The laws will come into effect from mid-May and aim to improve liveability for residents who have long complained of disruption caused by tourists.

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Starship: SpaceX tests the most powerful ever rocket system

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.By Jonathan AmosBBC Science Correspondent@BBCAmosElon Musk's SpaceX company has performed a key test on its huge new rocket system, Starship.

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Brazil expelling illegal miners from indigenous lands

Government officials burned a plane and seized boats, weapons and petrol used by the miners in a remote region of the Amazon rainforest, which belongs to the Yanomami indigenous group. Thousands of illegal gold miners have invaded the indigenous reserve on Brazil's border with Venezuela.

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Roger Waters: Former Pink Floyd star's UN speech criticised by Ukraine

Pink Floyd star Roger Waters has used a speech to the United Nations to repeat his controversial claim that Russia's invasion of Ukraine was "provoked". The musician was invited by Russia to address the UN Security Council.

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Orca mothers make 'lifelong sacrifice' for sons

Rearing a son significantly reduced a female killer whale's chance of reproducing in the future. The energy they need to feed sons appears to compromise their health, leaving them less able to reproduce and raise other young.

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The mysterious doodles hidden in a 1,300-year-old book

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Google's AI bot mistake wipes $100bn off shares

Google is searching for ways to reassure people that it is still out in front in the race for the best artificial intelligence technology. And so far, the internet giant seems to be coming up with the wrong answer.

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Coordinate Plane Closure

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Mary Queen of Scots' letters found and decoded

More than 50 encoded letters sent by Mary Queen of Scots in the 16th Century have been found and deciphered by an international team of cryptographers. The letters, written during her English captivity, were found in a trawl of online archives at the National Library of France.

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Fawlty Towers: John Cleese to revive series with daughter

Comedy series Fawlty Towers is set to be revived after more than 40 years. John Cleese, who played Basil Fawlty, will be returning to write and star alongside his daughter Camilla Cleese.

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The cities built to be reusable

Many people now try to recycle their newspapers, plastic bottles and aluminium cans in an effort to reduce their household waste. But few of us think about the immense amount of waste produced in our names in a different way: the very buildings we live in.

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Microsoft unveils new Bing with ChatGPT powers

Microsoft has announced a new version of its search engine Bing, which incorporates the latest in artificial intelligence. The overhaul deploys OpenAI's ChatGPT technology, which has taken the world by storm since its launch last year.

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Digital pound likely this decade, Treasury says

A state-backed digital pound is likely to be launched later this decade, according to the Treasury and the Bank of England.Both institutions want to ensure the public has access to safe money that is easy to use in the digital age.

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Wheelchair adventurer closing in on marathon challenge

Darren Edwards from Shropshire started in Antarctica on 31 January and is due to finish in Florida on Tuesday. The former Army reservist is taking part in the World Marathon Challenge which also visits South Africa, Australia, Dubai, Brazil and Spain.

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'Google killer' ChatGPT sparks AI chatbot race

It has been two months since the public launch of AI chatbot ChatGPT by the firm OpenAI - and it did not take long for people to start noticing what a game-changer this really is.

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Strong earthquake hits south-eastern Turkey

This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version. You can receive Breaking News on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts.

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What is hybrid warfare? Inside the centre dealing with modern threats

Mysterious underwater explosions, anonymous cyber attacks and subtle online campaigns to undermine Western democracies - these are all "hybrid threats". The BBC visited a centre dedicated to targeting a relatively new form of warfare which is increasingly concerning Nato and the EU.

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Bageshwar Dham Sarkar: The Indian guru making headlines over 'miracle' cures

India is home to thousands of religious gurus, but a controversial new "godman" has been making headlines for the past fortnight.

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New Rule: A Woke Revolution | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)

The problem with communism – and with some very recent ideologies here at home – is that they think you can change reality by screaming at it.

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Pakistan blocks Wikipedia for 'blasphemous content'

Wikipedia has been blocked in Pakistan for hosting "blasphemous content". The move was announced on Saturday after the free online encyclopaedia was given a 48-hour deadline to remove some material.

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Brexit causes collapse in European research funding for Oxbridge

One of the UK’s most prestigious universities has seen its funding from a large European research programme plummet from £62m a year to nothing since Brexit, new figures show.

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Australia radioactive capsule: Missing material more common than you think

The world watched as Australia scrambled to find a radioactive capsule in late January. Many asked how it could have been lost - but radioactive material goes missing more often than you might think.

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'I escaped abusive jungle cult - then rescued my son'

When Mexican police raided a self-styled Jewish sect, former members hoped it would spell the end of the group, which has been accused of crimes against children.

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The unruly ancient rituals still practised today

Once a year, on the island of South Ronaldsay, off the north coast of Scotland, the community prepares for two traditional events: The Festival of the Horse and the Boys' Ploughing Match.

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The mind-bending physics of time | Sean Carroll

How the Big Bang gave us time, explained by theoretical physicist Sean Carroll. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, The Universe in 90 minutes: Time, free will, God, & more ► https://youtu.be/tM4sLmt1Ui8 In th

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Why would China use a spy balloon when it has satellites?

News of an alleged Chinese spy balloon floating over the US has left many wondering why Beijing would want to use a relatively unsophisticated tool for its surveillance of the US mainland.

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The mystery of North America's missing eastern dinosaurs

Hidden within North America is a long-forgotten continent once ruled by a bizarre cast of dinosaurs – but only a handful of fossils have ever been found. It was a typically warm, humid day in the Late Cretaceous.

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International Garden Photographer of the Year competition 2023

Tony North has been named winner of this year's International Garden Photographer of the Year competition. His picture was taken in the island of La Palma, which is part of the Canary Islands. It is entitled Blue Tajinaste and also won first place in the Breathing Spaces section of the competition.

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Mascara: What is the TikTok trend all about?

TikTok fan? Chances are you've seen a lot of people talking about mascara recently - but it isn't about make-up. People have been using the word to talk about relationships in a way that avoids TikTok's censorship filters.

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Shell reports highest profits in 115 years

Oil and gas giant Shell has reported record annual profits after energy prices surged last year following Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Profits hit $39.9bn (£32.2bn) in 2022, double last year's total and the highest in its 115-year history.

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Can Sri Lanka trade its way back to prosperity?

Sri Lanka is, in the words of its own president, "bankrupt". The Indian Ocean nation defaulted on its sovereign debt in May 2022, plunging the country into economic and political chaos.

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Horses and dogs sailed with Vikings to Britain, say scientists

Vikings sailing from Scandinavia to England brought horses, dogs and perhaps even pigs with them, according to analysis of bone remains. Invading Vikings were previously thought to have largely stolen animals from villages in Britain.

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Gatsby is joining Netlify

What does this mean in practice? There are a few important pieces for Gatsby users and community members and Gatsby Cloud customers: I created as a brain dump of all my ideas.

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Worthing man to run 360 marathons in 240 days across Africa

Russell Cook, from Worthing, West Sussex, said he will run 39.1 miles (63km) every day, with no rest days. The extreme challenge will begin on 5 February and is expected to take eight months.

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Could One Physics Theory Unlock the Mysteries of the Brain?

The ability of the phenomenon of criticality to explain the sudden emergence of new properties in complex systems has fascinated scientists in recent decades. When systems are balanced at their “critical point,” small changes in individual units can trigger outsized events, just as falling pebbl

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Russia in Africa: How disinformation operations target the continent

Image source, AFPGlobal Disinformation TeamA large social network that promotes anti-Western and pro-Kremlin ideas is helping Russia expand its influence at the expense of France in some of its former colonies in Africa.

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Missing radioactive capsule found in Australia

Authorities in Western Australia say they have found a tiny radioactive capsule which went missing last month. Emergency services had "literally found the needle in the haystack", they said.

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Sex and no sleep may be killing endangered quolls

Endangered male northern quolls are giving up sleep for more sex - and it could be killing them, according to new research from Australia. The study found that males travel long distances in search of mating partners, often giving up sleep in the process.

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Iran dancing couple given 10-year jail sentence

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC News An Iranian couple in their 20s have been given jail sentences totalling 10 years after posting a video of themselves dancing in the street.They were reportedly convicted for promoting corruption, prostitution and propaganda.

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Asaram Bapu: Indian guru jailed for life in second rape case

An Indian court has sentenced a self-styled spiritual guru to life imprisonment for raping one of his devotees. Asaram Bapu was found guilty of assaulting the woman several times between 2001 and 2006 at his ashram in the western state of Gujarat.

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Canada province experiments with decriminalising hard drugs

Canada's province of British Columbia is starting a first-in-the-nation trial decriminalising small amounts of hard drugs such as cocaine and heroin. From Tuesday, adults can possess up to 2.5g of such drugs, as well as methamphetamine, fentanyl and morphine.

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What impact has Brexit had on the UK economy?

Like it - or not - it has been three years since the UK left the European Union. Since then there has been a pandemic, swiftly followed by an energy crisis.

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Sichuan: Couples in Chinese province allowed to have unlimited children

Couples in China's Sichuan province will be allowed to have as many children as they want, as the country continues to try and get a grip on its declining population. Last year, the population in China fell for the first time in 60 years.

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Mining giant 'sorry' over lost radioactive capsule in Australia

Mining giant Rio Tinto says it is working with authorities to try to find a radioactive capsule that went missing in Western Australia this month. The casing contains a small quantity of radioactive Caesium-137, which could cause serious illness if touched.

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Music’s power over your brain, explained | Michael Spitzer

Humans are musical animals 4 million years in the making, explained by music expert Michael Spitzer. Subscribe to Big Think on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQECJukTDE2i6aCoMnS-Vg?sub_confirmation=1 Up next, 40,000 years of music explained in 8 minutes ► https://youtu.be/Am18ZxKgi

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Mensa: What happens when 'child geniuses' grow up

BBC NewsA four-year-old boy made headlines this week after becoming the UK's youngest member of Mensa, the society for people with sky-high IQ. Teddy - who can count to 100 in six languages including Mandarin - is already far more advanced than his peers.

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Body-cam footage shows moment of Paul Pelosi attack

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC News, WashingtonA US court has authorised the release of footage showing the hammer attack on the husband of former House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

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Code Lifespan

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What If Alien Life Were Silicon-Based?

Thank you to Brilliant for Supporting PBS. To learn more go to https://brilliant.org/SpaceTime/ PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:http://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE Sign Up on Patreon to get access to the Space Time Discord! https://www.patreon.com/pbssp

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How an ancient Greek myth still shapes our minds

When I was five years old, my grandmother gave my younger sister and me a picture book which outlined in detail how a man and a woman have sex to create a baby. We were enthralled.

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Shopping purchases may help spot ovarian cancer

Tracking what shoppers buy, via loyalty-card data, can help spot those with early signs of cancer, doctors who have been running a study say. Frequent purchases of over-the-counter painkillers and indigestion tablets revealed a higher risk of ovarian cancer, they found.

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Egypt archaeology: Gold-covered mummy among latest discoveries

Archaeologists say they have found a gold leaf-covered mummy sealed inside a sarcophagus that has been unopened for 4,300 years. The mummy, the remains of a man named Hekashepes, is thought to be one of the oldest and most complete non-royal corpses ever found in Egypt.

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Asteroid to pass closer than some satellites

You definitely shouldn't panic but there is a biggish asteroid about to pass by Earth in the coming hours. About the size of a bus, the space rock, known as 2023 BU, will whip over the southern tip of South America just after midnight GMT.

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Opium production in Myanmar surges to nine-year high

The production of opium increased sharply in Myanmar after falling for seven years, according to the UN. It touched nearly 795 metric tonnes in 2022, nearly double the production in 2021 - 423 metric tonnes - the year of the military coup.

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Can these rocks really power light bulbs? No, say the experts

Videos said to show that rocks found in Africa can produce electricity have been viewed millions of times online. Some social media users are claiming they could be the answer to the continent's energy problems.

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AI and Robots Are Coming – To Drive Human Spirit

William E. Halal is professor emeritus at George Washington University, Washington, DC. His latest book is Beyond Knowledge: How Technology is Driving an Age of Consciousness. William E.

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How to use ChatGPT for Strategic Foresight

If you have spent the last few weeks testing out ChatGPT, the AI chatbot that has turned everyone on social media into a futurist, you might be impressed — as I have been — by its utter humility.

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How climate change threatens to close ski resorts

Anzère is often hailed as Europe's greenest ski resort. But the Swiss village had a difficult start to its 2023 winter season.

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Leprosy: the ancient disease scientists can't solve

In the wild, the only known carrier of Mycobacterium leprae, the bacteria that causes leprosy, is a mammal that looks rather like a large rat with a long snout dressed in leathery armour – the nine-banded armadillo.

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Self-styled spiritual leader John de Ruiter charged with sex crimes

Image source, College of Integrated Philosophyin WashingtonA messianic leader of a multi-million dollar spiritual organisation in western Canada has been charged with four counts of sexual assault.

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Portishead boy joins Mensa after teaching himself to read aged two

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsA boy who taught himself to read as a toddler has been accepted as the UK's youngest member of Mensa.Four-year-old Teddy, from Portishead in Somerset, can count to 100 in six non-native languages, including Mandarin.

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Japan PM says country on the brink over falling birth rate

Japan's prime minister says his country is on the brink of not being able to function as a society because of its falling birth rate. Japan - population 125 million - is estimated to have had fewer than 800,000 births last year. In the 1970s, that figure was more than two million.

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How gut bacteria are controlling your brain

Your gut is a bustling and thriving alien colony. They number in their trillions and include thousands of different species. Many of these microorganisms, including bacteria, archaea and eukarya, were here long before humans, have evolved alongside us and now outnumber our own cells many times over.

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Peru protests: Iconic Machu Picchu closed indefinitely

Peru has closed its famous tourist site Machu Picchu indefinitely over the ongoing protests against the country's president. The government said it took the decision to protect tourists and its own citizens.

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Japan was the future but it's stuck in the past

In Japan, houses are like cars. As soon as you move in, your new home is worth less than what you paid for it and after you've finished paying off your mortgage in 40 years, it is worth almost nothing.

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Debt ceiling: America's budget crisis of its own creation

Fire up the giant digital billboards with their ever-increasing dollar displays. Start calculating how much every American man, woman and child owes. Cue the comparisons to a family budget, or credit-card spending or running a small business.

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Light pollution: Huge fall in stars that can be seen with naked eye

The number of stars that people can see with the naked eye has reduced dramatically over the last decade. The cause is "Skyglow" from artificial lighting - the brightness of that glow has increased every year since 2011.

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The race to make diesel engines run on hydrogen

It's a new hydrogen-diesel hybrid engine affectionately known as "baby number two" that could help to decarbonise some of Australia's heaviest industries.

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Secrets of life on Newport's medieval ship revealed

In the summer of 2002, thousands flocked to the banks of the River Usk in Newport, to see a piece of history. In the middle of a building site, the mud had been cleared to reveal the 500-year-old remains of a trading ship.

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Newport Ship: Medieval vessel is 'world's largest 3D puzzle'

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.BBC NewsWith almost 2,500 pieces, measuring 30 metres and weighing 25 tonnes, it has been called the world's largest 3D puzzle.

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Iranian man who beheaded 17-year-old wife jailed for eight years

Images of Sajjad Heydari carrying Mona's severed head in Ahvaz after the so-called "honou