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Scientists have found preserved proteins in 3.8-million-year-old ostrich eggshells from Africa. The researchers say these biological building blocks - bound into the eggshell - could provide genetic information up to 50 times older than any DNA.
 dinosaur ostrich egg cloning genetics protein
Scientists have taken another step in their quest to understand the bare genetic essentials of life. This minimal number is lower than in any known free-living bug in nature.
 bacteria evolution genetics life programming
Scientists studying the DNA of Neanderthals say they can find no evidence that this ancient species ever interbred with modern humans. But our closest ancestors may well have been able to speak as well as us.

2009-02-12

 evolution Neanderthal interbreeding genetics speech homo sapiens
The rate of illegitimate births in the British population is much lower than many people believe, a study says. It suggests an oft-quoted figure of one in 10 for the number of children fathered illegitimately is a myth. The real number is more likely to be less than one in 25, researchers say.

2009-02-11

 genealogy genetics illegitimate adoption infidelity family tree surname ancestor
Oxford University's former Professor for the Public Understanding of Science, Richard Dawkins, is one of the world's staunchest defenders of the theory of evolution...

2009-02-14

 evolution philosophy religion atheism Charles Darwin DNA genetics Richard Dawkins
Some people may be genetically programmed to be unfaithful to their partner, a scientist has claimed. ... Focusing on women, he found that if one of a pair of twins had a history of infidelity, the chances her sister would also stray were about 55%. In general it is estimated that just 23% of women are not faithful.

2004-06-07

 sex evolution attraction genetics love infidelity women fidelity
A single gene can turn the Don Juan of voles into an attentive home-loving husband, Nature magazine has reported. By altering the small animal's brain hormone chemistry, scientists have made a promiscuous meadow vole faithful - just like its prairie vole cousin. The researchers think this will lead to a greater understanding of how social behaviour is controlled in humans...

2004-06-16

 sex marriage genetics love fidelity monogamy
We are going from reading our genetic code to the ability to write it. That gives us the hypothetical ability to do things never contemplated before". ... Mr Venter believes designer genomes have enormous positive potential if properly regulated. In the long-term, he hopes they could lead to alternative energy sources previously unthinkable. Bacteria could be created, he speculates, that could help mop up excessive carbon dioxide,...
 genetics evolution DNA artificial life
The study, which was carried out on just 1% of our DNA code, challenges the view that genes are the main players in driving our biochemistry. Instead, it suggests genes, so called junk DNA and other elements, together weave an intricate control network. ... He explained that the study had found junk DNA was being transcribed, or copied, into RNA - an active molecule that relays information from DNA to the cellular machinery. He added:...

2007-06-14

 genome human RNA DNA genetics
Most genome sequencers are looking for genes inside living species to understand their function. But one genome project is deliberately searching for the smallest DNA sequences that are completely absent from species - perhaps because they are so harmful they are simply not compatible with life.

2007-01-03

 genetics
and what makes people different may not just be their different genes, but how many copies they have of each one, new DNA maps reveal.

2006-11-22

 genetics
They have a complex social life, highly sophisticated communications and a remarkable memory - all contained in 1.8 million base pairs.

2006-10-25

 genetics
A mother’s diet can change the behaviour of a specific gene for at least two subsequent generations, a new study demonstrates for the first time.

2006-11-13

 genetics
The amount of food a boy eats in the years before puberty influences his grandchildren's risk of diabetes, a small Swedish study suggests. ... (M)ales in areas with a surfeit of food were four times more likely to have grandchildren who died of diabetes mellitus than those who suffered famine in childhood...

2002-10-31

 genetics
... a phenomenon called RNA interference, which regulates the expression of genes. ... The work ... could lead to new treatments for a range of illnesses, including viral infections and cancer.

2006-10-02

 genetics

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